Special Issue "Community-engaged Indigenous Research Across the Globe"

A special issue of Genealogy (ISSN 2313-5778).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Michelle Johnson-Jennings
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Indigenous Community Engaged Research, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5C8, Canada
Interests: Indigenous communities; decolonizing healing while transforming narratives of trauma; land-based healing; Indigenous psychology; community based participatory research, community-engaged research; health promotion/chronic disease prevention; food and obesity addiction prevention
Dr. Shanondora Billiot
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Social Work, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA
Interests: community- based participatory research and social policies related to: the health and wellbeing of Indigenous peoples; environmental and social determinants of health; specifically; chronic and historical trauma related to global and environmental changes
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Genealogy invites submissions for the "Community Engaged Indigenous Research Across the Globe" Special Issue. Despite most Indigenous communities experiencing colonization resulting in land and food trauma, depletion of cultural resources, and health/wellbeing; Indigenous communities have still retained and, or are actively reclaiming their ancestral cultural identities and practices to reestablish balance and health. Community-engaged research, and, or Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR), have risen as frameworks that give communities voice and control. These approaches, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, partner with communities in creating meaningful, ethical research that can ameliorate the detrimental effects of historical trauma. This issue seeks to highlight community engaged/cbpr research with and for Indigenous communities from across the globe (i.e., the Americas, New Zealand, Australia, Canada, Northern Europe, Africa, etc.). We  invite scholars from vast arrays of disciplines including, but not limited to, Indigenous studies, biomedical sciences, social sciences and humanities. This issue aims to publish innovative and thought provoking community engaged research, while providing the ability to determine common overlaps and approaches utilized by Indigenous communities and scientists. Overall, our purpose is to reconsider how community engagement, and CBPR can be best operationalized within Indigenous communities to yield meaningful research. We further hope to augment the literature in determining how Indigenous communities can guide and lead in research and implement sustainable changes that combat the effects of colonization and spurs cultural continuity.

Some topics may include the following:

  • How do Indigenous communities and researchers operationalize engagement in culturally appropriate and ethical manners?
  • Methods in which Indigenous communities engage within their environment and on the land to conduct research?
  • Descriptions of innovative approaches to partnerships, research design, or interventions that increase cultural continuity and wellbeing;
  • Use of community engaged/cbpr research to increase cultural continuity and health;
  • Decolonizing approaches to community-engaged or community-based participatory research;
  • Long-term impacts to communities who engage and participate in research.

Please note that papers submitted to this special issue will be waived of the APC(article processing charge) after being accepted.

Dr. Michelle Johnson-Jennings
Dr. Shanondora Billiot
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genealogy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Indigenous
  • community engaged research
  • community based participatory research CBPR
  • land-based healing
  • decolonized research
  • historical trauma
  • grassroots research
  • global Indigenous research

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Dissemination of an American Indian Culturally Centered Community-Based Participatory Research Family Listening Program: Implications for Global Indigenous Well-Being
Genealogy 2020, 4(4), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4040099 - 30 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 539
Abstract
We introduce a culture-centered indigenous program called the Family Listening Program (FLP), which was developed through a long-standing community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnership involving tribal research teams (TRTs) from three American Indian communities (Apache, Navajo, and Pueblo) with the University of New Mexico’s [...] Read more.
We introduce a culture-centered indigenous program called the Family Listening Program (FLP), which was developed through a long-standing community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnership involving tribal research teams (TRTs) from three American Indian communities (Apache, Navajo, and Pueblo) with the University of New Mexico’s Center for Participatory Research (UNM-CPR). This paper provides background information on the TRT/UNM-CPR multi-generational FLP intervention funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and how it is poised to take the next steps of dissemination and implementation (D&I). In preparing for the next steps, the TRT/UNM-CPR team piloted two FLP dissemination activities, first at the state-level and then nationally; this paper describes these activities. Based on the learnings from the pilot dissemination, the TRT/UNM-CPR team developed an innovative D&I model by integrating a community-based participatory research culture-centered science (CBPR-CCS) approach with the Interactive Systems Framework (ISF) to examine the uptake, cultural acceptance, and sustainability of the FLP as an evidence-based indigenous family program. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community-engaged Indigenous Research Across the Globe)
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Open AccessArticle
Returning to Our Roots: Tribal Health and Wellness through Land-Based Healing
Genealogy 2020, 4(3), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4030091 - 03 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1316
Abstract
(1) Background: Settler colonialism has severely disrupted Indigenous ancestral ways of healing and being, contributing to an onslaught of health disparities. In particular, the United Houma Nation (UHN) has faced large land loss and trauma, dispossession, and marginalization. Given the paucity of research [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Settler colonialism has severely disrupted Indigenous ancestral ways of healing and being, contributing to an onslaught of health disparities. In particular, the United Houma Nation (UHN) has faced large land loss and trauma, dispossession, and marginalization. Given the paucity of research addressing health for Indigenous individuals living in Louisiana, this study sought to co-identify a United Houma Nation health framework, by co-developing a community land-based healing approach in order to inform future community-based health prevention programs. (2) Methods: This pilot tested, co-designed and implemented a land-based healing pilot study among Houma women utilizing a health promotion leadership approach and utilized semi-structured interviews among 20 UHN women to identify a UHN health framework to guide future results. (3) Results: The findings indicated that RTOR was a feasible pilot project. The initial themes were (1.) place, (2.) environmental/land trauma, (3.) ancestors, (4.) spirituality/mindfulness, (5.) cultural continuity, and (6.) environment and health. The reconnection to land was deemed feasible and seen as central to renewing relationships with ancestors (aihalia asanochi taha), others, and body. This mindful, re-engagement with the land contributed to subthemes of developing stronger tribal identities, recreating ceremonies, and increased cultural continuity, and transforming narratives of trauma into hope and resilience. Based on these findings a Houma Health (Uma Hochokma) Framework was developed and presented. (4) Conclusions: Overall, this study found that land can serve as a feasible therapeutic site for healing through reconnecting Houma tribal citizens to both ancestral knowledges and stories of resilience, as well as viewing self as part of a larger collective. These findings also imply that revisiting historically traumatic places encouraged renewed commitment to cultural continuity and health behaviors—particularly when these places are approached relationally, with ceremony, and traumatic events tied to these places, including climate change and environmental/land trauma, are acknowledged along with the love the ancestors held for future generations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community-engaged Indigenous Research Across the Globe)
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Open AccessArticle
Addressing Substance Use Utilizing a Community-Based Program among Urban Native American Youth Living in Florida
Genealogy 2020, 4(3), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4030079 - 23 Jul 2020
Viewed by 683
Abstract
This study was conducted in Florida among two urban Native American youth programs that are sponsored by urban Native American community organizations. Convenience and snowballing were used as a sample recruitment strategy. Assignment to the experimental condition (UTC) and the control condition (SE) [...] Read more.
This study was conducted in Florida among two urban Native American youth programs that are sponsored by urban Native American community organizations. Convenience and snowballing were used as a sample recruitment strategy. Assignment to the experimental condition (UTC) and the control condition (SE) was established by randomizing the two community youth program sites to the two conditions. Utilization of a culturally relevant theory, Native-Reliance, guided the intervention approach for the prevention of substance use among urban Native American youth. Results of this study provided evidence that a culturally based intervention was significantly more effective for the reduction of substance use interest and general well-being than a non-culturally based intervention for urban Native American youth. Prevention programs for urban Native American early adolescent youth that utilize Native American strengths, values, and beliefs to promote healthy behavior and reduce the harm associated with high-risk behaviors such as substance use are strongly recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community-engaged Indigenous Research Across the Globe)
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Open AccessArticle
Utilizing Webs to Share Ancestral and Intergenerational Teachings: The Process of Co-Building an Online Digital Repository in Partnership with Indigenous Communities
Genealogy 2020, 4(3), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4030070 - 01 Jul 2020
Viewed by 577
Abstract
Indigenous knowledge and wisdom continue to guide food and land practices, which may be key to lowering high rates of diabetes and obesity among Indigenous communities. The purpose of this paper is to describe how Indigenous, ancestral, and wise practices around food and [...] Read more.
Indigenous knowledge and wisdom continue to guide food and land practices, which may be key to lowering high rates of diabetes and obesity among Indigenous communities. The purpose of this paper is to describe how Indigenous, ancestral, and wise practices around food and land can best be reclaimed, revitalized, and reinvented through the use of an online digital platform. Key informant interviews and focus groups were conducted in order to identify digital data needs for food and land practices. Participants included Indigenous key informants, ranging from elders to farmers. Key questions included: (1) How could an online platform be deemed suitable for Indigenous communities to catalogue food wisdom? (2) What types of information would be useful to classify? (3) What other related needs exist? Researchers analyzed field notes, identified themes, and used a consensual qualitative research approach. Three themes were found, including a need for the appropriate use of Indigenous knowledges and sharing such online, a need for community control of Indigenous knowledges, and a need and desire to share wise practices with others online. An online Food Wisdom Repository that contributes to the health and wellbeing of Indigenous peoples through cultural continuity appears appropriate if it follows the outlined needs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community-engaged Indigenous Research Across the Globe)
Open AccessArticle
Utilizing Photovoice to Support Indigenous Accounts of Environmental Change and Injustice
Genealogy 2020, 4(2), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4020051 - 20 Apr 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 857
Abstract
Global environmental changes can happen quickly or over extended periods and have compounding effects. Indigenous communities experience environmental changes that can lead to a decline in quality of life, illness or disease, and unwelcome cultural adaptations that extend to future generations. Due to [...] Read more.
Global environmental changes can happen quickly or over extended periods and have compounding effects. Indigenous communities experience environmental changes that can lead to a decline in quality of life, illness or disease, and unwelcome cultural adaptations that extend to future generations. Due to limited resources and political marginalization, members of these communities may not be able to respond to or prevent these conditions. Cultural connections to the land and community, along with limited resources, impact Indigenous peoples’ willingness and ability to relocate to different geographic locations experiencing less damaging ecological changes or environmental risk. In this article, we respond to the Special Issue prompt probing “[m]ethods in which Indigenous communities engage within their environment and on the land to conduct research”. We begin by describing environmental change, followed by a scoping review of Photovoice studies focused on environmental issues. Environmental changes affecting Indigenous groups are discussed, including a case study and a discussion of the ways that Photovoice can support and honor Indigenous peoples’ connection to the natural environment. This article is not intended to be an exhaustive review, but rather seeks to understand how Photovoice is being used to respond to and document environmental change, and how such visual methodologies can be used in Indigenous communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community-engaged Indigenous Research Across the Globe)
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Open AccessArticle
La Cultura Cura: An Exploration of Enculturation in a Community-Based Culture-Centered HIV Prevention Curriculum for Indigenous Youth
Genealogy 2020, 4(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4010017 - 04 Feb 2020
Viewed by 788
Abstract
Community based participatory research and attention to cultural resilience is recommended in HIV prevention research with Indigenous communities. This paper presents qualitative findings from evaluation of a culture-centered HIV prevention curriculum for Indigenous youth that was developed using a community based participatory research [...] Read more.
Community based participatory research and attention to cultural resilience is recommended in HIV prevention research with Indigenous communities. This paper presents qualitative findings from evaluation of a culture-centered HIV prevention curriculum for Indigenous youth that was developed using a community based participatory research approach. Specifically, the authors focus on youth descriptions of cultural resilience and enculturation factors after participating in the curriculum. Thematic analysis of in-depth interviews with 23 youth participants yields three salient themes associated with cultural resilience and enculturation factors including: Development of cultural pride, honoring ancestors through traditional cultural practices, and acknowledging resilience and resistance within Indigenous communities. Additionally, per community directive, the authors share an observation of changes to identity descriptions from pre-curriculum baseline to post-curriculum interviews, pointing to a possible increase in awareness of Indigenous cultural identity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community-engaged Indigenous Research Across the Globe)
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Open AccessArticle
Old Wisdom: Indigenous Democracy Principles as Strategies for Social Change within Organizations and Tribal Communities
Genealogy 2020, 4(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4010010 - 19 Jan 2020
Viewed by 632
Abstract
Community engagement founded on Indigenous decision-making practices is essential in addressing issues during turbulent times and ever-changing political landscapes. Indigenous leaders on this continent were instrumental in practicing democracy to address issues impacting local communities with the people, not in isolation. This paper [...] Read more.
Community engagement founded on Indigenous decision-making practices is essential in addressing issues during turbulent times and ever-changing political landscapes. Indigenous leaders on this continent were instrumental in practicing democracy to address issues impacting local communities with the people, not in isolation. This paper highlights the Search Conference model as a community based participatory change model with Indigenous principles embedded in the process. Specific cases are presented to demonstrate lessons learned. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community-engaged Indigenous Research Across the Globe)
Open AccessArticle
Reconnecting Rural Native Hawaiian Families to Food through Aquaponics
Genealogy 2020, 4(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4010009 - 15 Jan 2020
Viewed by 886
Abstract
Food insecurity is a pressing issue in Hawai‘i as the vast majority of available and accessible foods are imported. To address this issue, a backyard aquaponics program was implemented from 2010 to 2016 to offer additional avenues to food sovereignty in a rural [...] Read more.
Food insecurity is a pressing issue in Hawai‘i as the vast majority of available and accessible foods are imported. To address this issue, a backyard aquaponics program was implemented from 2010 to 2016 to offer additional avenues to food sovereignty in a rural predominantly Native Hawaiian community. Aquaponics provides a contained and sustainable food production system that models Native Hawaiian principles of land and water stewardship. The purpose of this community-engaged study was to identify the outcomes and resources needed to continue sustaining the backyard aquaponics systems. The researchers began building a relationship with the community by helping to build several aquaponics systems. The researchers and community partner co-developed the interview questions and participants were interviewed in-person. The outcomes of the study revealed multiple benefits of having a backyard aquaponics system, including increased access to vegetables and fruit, improved diet, low maintenance cost, and enhanced family and community connectedness. Participants reported a renewed connection to Native Hawaiian values, especially land stewardship. Challenges included leaks and breakages with the system, overproduction of fish, complications in water temperature, and vulnerability to unpredictable weather. These findings suggest that backyard aquaponics systems have the potential to provide multiple benefits including alleviating barriers related to food security. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community-engaged Indigenous Research Across the Globe)
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Open AccessArticle
(Re)constructing Conceptualizations of Health and Resilience among Native Hawaiians
Genealogy 2020, 4(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4010008 - 05 Jan 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 908
Abstract
Biomedical definitions of health have conventionally taken problem-based approaches to health, which may disregard indigenous perspectives of health that take a holistic approach and emphasize the importance of maintaining balance between physical, mental, and spiritual health and relationships maintained with others, the land, [...] Read more.
Biomedical definitions of health have conventionally taken problem-based approaches to health, which may disregard indigenous perspectives of health that take a holistic approach and emphasize the importance of maintaining balance between physical, mental, and spiritual health and relationships maintained with others, the land, and the spiritual realm. Resilience-based approaches to health have been shown to foster strengths in indigenous communities, including the Native Hawaiian community, which leads to more positive health outcomes. The research questions of this paper asked, “how do Native Hawaiians conceptualize health and the concept of resilience specific to health?”. Qualitative methods were employed to explore the concept of resilience from the perspective of 12 Native Hawaiian adults. Community leaders and key stakeholders aided in the purposive recruitment process. The themes of this study include: (1) health maintained through balance, (2) being unhealthy vs. being ill, (3) the concept of colonialism and resulting adversities, and (4) protective and resilience factors that foster health. Cultural values and cultural practices may address concerns related to health disparities that stem from cultural and historical trauma, determinants of health, and environmental changes. Health interventions that are culturally-, family-, spiritually-, and land-based may particularly aid in responsiveness to health programs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community-engaged Indigenous Research Across the Globe)
Open AccessArticle
Thought Space Wānanga—A Kaupapa Māori Decolonizing Approach to Research Translation
Genealogy 2019, 3(4), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy3040074 - 16 Dec 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 990
Abstract
This paper discusses an indigenous Māori approach, named Thought Space Wānanga, for sharing knowledge and accelerating the translation of research into practical outcomes through transformational practices, policies, and theory development. In contexts such as New Zealand, there is an increasing demand on all [...] Read more.
This paper discusses an indigenous Māori approach, named Thought Space Wānanga, for sharing knowledge and accelerating the translation of research into practical outcomes through transformational practices, policies, and theory development. In contexts such as New Zealand, there is an increasing demand on all publicly funded researchers to demonstrate the impact of their research and to show pathways for achieving social and economic outcomes from single, focused projects. Knowledge translation is the most common term used to describe the link between research and impact and the process of turning research into results. While it is highly debatable whether planning for this at the front end of research will necessarily lead to such high-level outcomes being achieved, many indigenous researchers aim for their research to be translated into real world positive outcomes for indigenous communities. Thought Space Wānanga is a facilitated process framed within Māori cultural protocols, designed to help indigenous Māori researchers meet that aspiration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community-engaged Indigenous Research Across the Globe)
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