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Open AccessArticle

Utilizing Webs to Share Ancestral and Intergenerational Teachings: The Process of Co-Building an Online Digital Repository in Partnership with Indigenous Communities

1
Community Health and Epidemiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A2, Canada
2
School of Social Work, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
3
Indigenous Community Health (RICH) Center, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA
4
Department of Pharmacy Practice and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Genealogy 2020, 4(3), 70; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4030070
Received: 5 May 2020 / Revised: 11 June 2020 / Accepted: 15 June 2020 / Published: 1 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community-engaged Indigenous Research Across the Globe)
Indigenous knowledge and wisdom continue to guide food and land practices, which may be key to lowering high rates of diabetes and obesity among Indigenous communities. The purpose of this paper is to describe how Indigenous, ancestral, and wise practices around food and land can best be reclaimed, revitalized, and reinvented through the use of an online digital platform. Key informant interviews and focus groups were conducted in order to identify digital data needs for food and land practices. Participants included Indigenous key informants, ranging from elders to farmers. Key questions included: (1) How could an online platform be deemed suitable for Indigenous communities to catalogue food wisdom? (2) What types of information would be useful to classify? (3) What other related needs exist? Researchers analyzed field notes, identified themes, and used a consensual qualitative research approach. Three themes were found, including a need for the appropriate use of Indigenous knowledges and sharing such online, a need for community control of Indigenous knowledges, and a need and desire to share wise practices with others online. An online Food Wisdom Repository that contributes to the health and wellbeing of Indigenous peoples through cultural continuity appears appropriate if it follows the outlined needs. View Full-Text
Keywords: indigenous health; world wide web; wise practices; digital repository; ancestral teachings indigenous health; world wide web; wise practices; digital repository; ancestral teachings
MDPI and ACS Style

Jennings, D.; Johnson-Jennings, M.; Little, M. Utilizing Webs to Share Ancestral and Intergenerational Teachings: The Process of Co-Building an Online Digital Repository in Partnership with Indigenous Communities. Genealogy 2020, 4, 70.

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