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Article

Reconnecting Rural Native Hawaiian Families to Food through Aquaponics

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Office of Public Health Studies, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
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God’s Country Waimānalo, Waimānalo, HI 96795, USA
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Ke Kula Nui O Waimānalo, Waimānalo, HI 96795, USA
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College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, Waimānalo Learning Center, Waimānalo, HI 96795, USA
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College of Education, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
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School of Social Work, University of Washington, Indigenous Wellness Research Institute, Seattle, WA 98105, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Genealogy 2020, 4(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4010009
Received: 30 November 2019 / Revised: 28 December 2019 / Accepted: 9 January 2020 / Published: 15 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community-Engaged Indigenous Research across the Globe)
Food insecurity is a pressing issue in Hawai‘i as the vast majority of available and accessible foods are imported. To address this issue, a backyard aquaponics program was implemented from 2010 to 2016 to offer additional avenues to food sovereignty in a rural predominantly Native Hawaiian community. Aquaponics provides a contained and sustainable food production system that models Native Hawaiian principles of land and water stewardship. The purpose of this community-engaged study was to identify the outcomes and resources needed to continue sustaining the backyard aquaponics systems. The researchers began building a relationship with the community by helping to build several aquaponics systems. The researchers and community partner co-developed the interview questions and participants were interviewed in-person. The outcomes of the study revealed multiple benefits of having a backyard aquaponics system, including increased access to vegetables and fruit, improved diet, low maintenance cost, and enhanced family and community connectedness. Participants reported a renewed connection to Native Hawaiian values, especially land stewardship. Challenges included leaks and breakages with the system, overproduction of fish, complications in water temperature, and vulnerability to unpredictable weather. These findings suggest that backyard aquaponics systems have the potential to provide multiple benefits including alleviating barriers related to food security. View Full-Text
Keywords: community-based participatory research; food security; nutrition; community garden; Hawaii; indigenous; qualitative community-based participatory research; food security; nutrition; community garden; Hawaii; indigenous; qualitative
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MDPI and ACS Style

Beebe, J.K.; Amshoff, Y.; Ho-Lastimosa, I.; Moayedi, G.; Bradley, A.L.C.; Kim, I.N.; Casson, N.; Protzman, R.; Espiritu, D.; Spencer, M.S.; Chung-Do, J.J. Reconnecting Rural Native Hawaiian Families to Food through Aquaponics. Genealogy 2020, 4, 9. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4010009

AMA Style

Beebe JK, Amshoff Y, Ho-Lastimosa I, Moayedi G, Bradley ALC, Kim IN, Casson N, Protzman R, Espiritu D, Spencer MS, Chung-Do JJ. Reconnecting Rural Native Hawaiian Families to Food through Aquaponics. Genealogy. 2020; 4(1):9. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4010009

Chicago/Turabian Style

Beebe, Jazmine K., Yvette Amshoff, Ilima Ho-Lastimosa, Ghazaleh Moayedi, Asha L.C. Bradley, Inji N. Kim, Napua Casson, Robert Protzman, Danielle Espiritu, Michael S. Spencer, and Jane J. Chung-Do. 2020. "Reconnecting Rural Native Hawaiian Families to Food through Aquaponics" Genealogy 4, no. 1: 9. https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy4010009

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