Special Issue "Star Formation in the Ultraviolet"

A special issue of Galaxies (ISSN 2075-4434).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Jorick S. Vink
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Armagh Observatory and Planetarium, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DB, UK
Interests: Wolf-Rayet stars; Supernovae; Star Formation; accretion disks; pre-main sequence stars

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the launch of JWST and the upcoming installation of extremely large telescopes, the first galaxies in our Universe will finally be revealed. Their light will be dominated by massive stars, which peak in in the ultra-violet (UV) part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Star formation is the key driver of the evolution of our Universe. At young ages, within 10 Million years, both high and low mass stars generate complex UV emission processes which are poorly understood yet are vital for interpreting high redshift line emission. For these reasons, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) will devote 1000 orbits to obtaining a UV Legacy Library of Young Stars as Essential Standards (ULLYSES). The purpose of this Special Volume is to outline the basic physical principles outlining the UV emission processes from local star formation within ~100 parsecs, via the huge star forming complexes containing hundreds of massive and very massive stars like 30 Doradus (Tarantula) in the Magallanic Clouds at 50 kilo parsecs, to galaxies near and far, up to the epoch of Cosmic Reionization.

References:

Calvet & Gullbring, 1998, ApJ 509, 802

Leitherer et al., 1999, ApJS 123, 3

Crowther et al., 2016, MNRAS 458, 624

Schaerer et al., 2002, A&A 382, 28

Vink et al., 2001, A&A 369, 574

Steidel et al., 2016, ApJ 826, 159

Prof. Jorick S. Vink
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • star formation
  • ultraviolet
  • massive stars
  • starbursts
  • H II regions
  • stars: early-type
  • stars: stellar winds
  • stars: atmospheres
  • galaxies: stellar content
  • galaxies: high-redshift
  • galaxies: evolution
  • cosmology: observations
  • cosmology: early universe

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Massive Star Formation in the Ultraviolet Observed with the Hubble Space Telescope
Galaxies 2020, 8(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/galaxies8010013 - 09 Feb 2020
Abstract
Spectroscopic observations of a massive star formation in the ultraviolet and their interpretation are reviewed. After a brief historical retrospective, two well-studied resolved star clusters and the surrounding H II regions are introduced: NGC 2070 in the Large Magellanic Cloud and NGC 604 [...] Read more.
Spectroscopic observations of a massive star formation in the ultraviolet and their interpretation are reviewed. After a brief historical retrospective, two well-studied resolved star clusters and the surrounding H II regions are introduced: NGC 2070 in the Large Magellanic Cloud and NGC 604 in M33. These regions serve as a training set for studies of more distant clusters, which can no longer be resolved into individual stars. Observations of recently formed star clusters and extended regions in star-forming galaxies in the nearby universe beyond the Local Group are presented. Their interpretation relies on spectral synthesis models. The successes and failures of such models are discussed, and future directions are highlighted. I present a case study of the extraordinary star cluster and giant H II region in the blue compact galaxy II Zw 40. The review concludes with a preview of two upcoming Hubble Space Telescope programs: ULLYSES, a survey of massive stars in nearby galaxies, and CLASSY, a study of massive star clusters in star-forming galaxies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Star Formation in the Ultraviolet)
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Open AccessReview
Applications of Stellar Population Synthesis in the Distant Universe
Galaxies 2020, 8(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/galaxies8010006 - 08 Jan 2020
Abstract
Comparison with artificial galaxy models is essential for translating the incomplete and low signal-to-noise data we can obtain on astrophysical stellar populations to physical interpretations which describe their composition, physical properties, histories and internal conditions. In particular, this is true for distant galaxies, [...] Read more.
Comparison with artificial galaxy models is essential for translating the incomplete and low signal-to-noise data we can obtain on astrophysical stellar populations to physical interpretations which describe their composition, physical properties, histories and internal conditions. In particular, this is true for distant galaxies, whose unresolved light embeds clues to their formations and evolutions, and their impacts on their wider environs. Stellar population synthesis models are now used as the foundation of analysis at all redshifts, but are not without their problems. Here we review the use of stellar population synthesis models, with a focus on applications in the distant Universe. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Star Formation in the Ultraviolet)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

The following authors would like to contribute:

Jorick S. Vink
Schneider et al.
John hillier
Claus Leitherer
Elizabeth Stanway
Ignacio Mendiguita
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