Special Issue "Chemical Kinetics of Biofuel Combustion"

A special issue of Fuels (ISSN 2673-3994).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 May 2022) | Viewed by 6415

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Elna Heimdal Nilsson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Combustion Physics, Department of Physics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Interests: combustion; biofuels; chemical kinetics; reduced kinetic mechanism; air pollution; renewable energy; metal combustion

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biofuel combustion will be an important source of energy in the foreseeable future, both for transportation and stationary energy production. To further develop combustion devices for efficient and clean biofuel combustion, a thorough understanding of the fuel chemistry is needed. The chemical kinetics governing ignition, propagation, and extinction of flames can be studied using dedicated experiments and computer simulations, often in combination. The term “biofuel” includes a wide range of compounds, from simple biogas and small alcohols to complex mixtures of heavy hydrocarbon compounds.

In this Special Issue, we will present research on the experimental and computational chemical kinetics of gaseous and liquid biofuels. In addition, we welcome contributions presenting chemical kinetics of novel combustion concepts like metal combustion and plasma-assisted combustion. We include studies from the very detailed level to the applications: fundamental experimental and computational studies of chemical reactivity of relevant biofuel compounds; laboratory studies of combustion systems to further elucidate chemical reaction mechanisms; simulation studies of zero- and one-dimensional systems; and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of real combustion devices including chemical kinetics.

Prof. Dr. Elna Heimdal Nilsson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fuels is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biofuel combustion
  • chemical kinetic modeling
  • combustion chemistry
  • experimental combustion
  • kinetics
  • biodiesel
  • bioalcohol

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Experimental Studies on Wood Pellets Combustion in a Fixed Bed Combustor Using Taguchi Method
Fuels 2021, 2(4), 376-392; https://doi.org/10.3390/fuels2040022 - 23 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1774
Abstract
The combustion of wood pellets in a fixed bed combustor of a 20 kW capacity domestic pellet boiler was tested according to several factors including Power, Excess Air (EA), Primary/Secondary air Split Ratio (SR) and Grate Area (GA). The Taguchi method was applied [...] Read more.
The combustion of wood pellets in a fixed bed combustor of a 20 kW capacity domestic pellet boiler was tested according to several factors including Power, Excess Air (EA), Primary/Secondary air Split Ratio (SR) and Grate Area (GA). The Taguchi method was applied to program the experimental design. Several parameters were measured, including gas emissions (CO), fuel bed temperature (measured at 4 different heights), and efficiency. The experimental results show that the lower CO emission and the higher efficiency were obtained at medium thermal loads and the highest temperature on the fuel bed was obtained at about ¼ of its height (15 mm). The results obtained from the analysis of variance (ANOVA) show that the SR and the Power are the most important factors contributing to the CO reduction and also increase the fuel bed temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Kinetics of Biofuel Combustion)
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Review

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Review
Evaluation of Chemical Kinetic Mechanisms for Methane Combustion: A Review from a CFD Perspective
Fuels 2021, 2(2), 210-240; https://doi.org/10.3390/fuels2020013 - 24 May 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3683
Abstract
Methane is an important fuel for gas turbine and gas engine combustion, and the most common fuel in fundamental combustion studies. As Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of combustion becomes increasingly important, so do chemical kinetic mechanisms for methane combustion. Kinetic mechanisms of [...] Read more.
Methane is an important fuel for gas turbine and gas engine combustion, and the most common fuel in fundamental combustion studies. As Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of combustion becomes increasingly important, so do chemical kinetic mechanisms for methane combustion. Kinetic mechanisms of different complexity exist, and the aim of this study is to review commonly used detailed, reduced, and global mechanisms of importance for CFD of methane combustion. In this review, procedures of relevance to model development are outlined. Simulations of zero and one-dimensional configurations have been performed over a wide range of conditions, including addition of H2, CO2 and H2O, and the results are used in a final recommendation about the use of the different mechanisms. The aim of this review is to put focus on the importance of an informed choice of kinetic mechanism to obtain accurate results at a reasonable computational cost. It is shown that for flame simulations, a reduced mechanism with only 42 irreversible reactions gives excellent agreement with experimental data, using only 5% of the computational time as compared to the widely used GRI-Mech 3.0. The reduced mechanisms are highly suitable for flame simulations, while for ignition they tend to react too slow, giving longer than expected ignition delay time. For combustible mixtures with addition of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, or water, the detailed as well as reduced mechanisms generally show as good performance as for the corresponding simulations of pure methane/air mixtures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Kinetics of Biofuel Combustion)
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