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Special Issue "Forest Stand Management and Biomass Growth"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Angela Lo Monaco

Department of Agriculture and Forest Science, University of Tuscia. Via San Camillo de Lellis snc, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: wood science and technology
Guest Editor
Dr. Paolo Cantiani

Research Centre for Forestry and Wood-Italian Council for Agricultural Research and Economics. Viale S. Margherita 80, 52100 Arezzo, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sustainable silviculture; forest ecology; forest structure; forest management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forests are natural or seminatural systems that can generate services and products that humans use directly or indirectly. Forest management involves economic, legal, and social aspects, as well as scientific and technical aspects. This includes management for wood or no-wood products, ecosystems services, dead wood, and other forest resource values, such as recreation, tourism, water, wildlife, as well as biomass for energy and carbon accumulation, also taking into account the increase in the rate of climate change in the next years. Timber extraction, plantation of tree species, roads, and pathways through forests are complementary elements, but not secondary to forest management.

The goal of this Special Issue is to provide a compendium of documents that scientifically evaluate the effects of different sustainable management approaches on services and products expected from forests, with respect to maintenance of biological diversity.

Prof. Dr. Angela Lo Monaco
Dr. Paolo Cantiani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Timber quality
  • Dead wood
  • Forest road
  • Timber extraction
  • Carbon sequestration
  • Biomass growth
  • Forest management planning

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Biomass Accumulation and Carbon Sequestration in an Age-Sequence of Mongolian Pine Plantations in Horqin Sandy Land, China
Forests 2019, 10(2), 197; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10020197 (registering DOI)
Received: 24 January 2019 / Revised: 13 February 2019 / Accepted: 20 February 2019 / Published: 22 February 2019
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Abstract
The Mongolian pine (Pinus sylvestris L. var. mongolica Litv.) was first introduced to the southeastern Horqin sandy land in the mid-1950s. Since then, it has been widely planted and has become the most important conifer species in Northern China, providing significant ecological, [...] Read more.
The Mongolian pine (Pinus sylvestris L. var. mongolica Litv.) was first introduced to the southeastern Horqin sandy land in the mid-1950s. Since then, it has been widely planted and has become the most important conifer species in Northern China, providing significant ecological, economic and social benefits. However, its function in sequestering carbon at different developmental stages has been little studied. In this study, twenty plots inventory and destructive sampling of eight trees were conducted in 12-, 19-, 34-, 48- and 58-year-old Mongolian pine stands of China. Allometric biomass equations (ABEs) for tree components were established and used to determine the magnitude and distribution of tree biomass and carbon density. The carbon density of the understory, forest floor and soil was also determined. The ABEs with age as the second variable could simply and accurately determine the biomass of plantation tree branches, foliage and fruit, which were considerably influenced by age. With increasing stand age, the proportion of stem biomass to total tree biomass increased from 22.2% in the 12-year-old stand to 54.2% in the 58-year-old stand, and the proportion of understory biomass to total ecosystem biomass decreased, with values of 7.5%, 4.6%, 4.4%, 4.1% and 3.0% in the five stands. The biomass of the forest floor was 0.00, 1.12, 2.04, 6.69 and 3.65 Mg ha−1 in the five stands. The ecosystem carbon density was 40.2, 73.4, 92.9, 89.9 and 87.3 Mg ha−1 in the 12-, 19-, 34-, 48-, and 58-year-old stands, in which soil carbon density accounted for the largest proportion, with values of 67.4%, 76.8%, 73.2%, 63.4%, and 57.7% respectively. The Mongolian pine had the potential for carbon sequestration during its development, especially in the early stages, however, in the later growth stage, the ecosystem carbon density decreased slightly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Stand Management and Biomass Growth)
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Open AccessArticle Timber and Branch Volume Prediction: Effects of Stand and Site Characteristics on Dendromass and Timber-To-Branch Volume Ratio of Norway Spruce in Managed Forests
Forests 2019, 10(2), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10020144
Received: 7 January 2019 / Revised: 4 February 2019 / Accepted: 8 February 2019 / Published: 10 February 2019
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Abstract
The objective of this study was to develop the models that predict both timber and branch volumes of Norway spruce (Picea abies/L./Karst.), the most abundant tree species in Europe, and determine the relationships among timber and branch volumes and various site [...] Read more.
The objective of this study was to develop the models that predict both timber and branch volumes of Norway spruce (Picea abies/L./Karst.), the most abundant tree species in Europe, and determine the relationships among timber and branch volumes and various site and stand characteristics. The data used in this study come from 76 sample plots in the different stands and site conditions across Norway spruce forests in the Czech Republic. Timber volume was determined by Huber’s formula and branch volume (logging residue) was determined by drying and weighing of 10 samples from the 10-chipped trees on each sample plot, meaning that a total of 760 samples were analyzed. The results showed that timber volume was significantly positively correlated with branch volume, mean diameter at breast height (mean DBH) per sample plot, mean height per sample plot, slope of sample plot, and stand age, but negatively correlated with stand stocking. The branch volume was more significantly affected by stand stocking than timber volume. The timber-to-branch volume ratio (TBR) reached the mean value of 3.7 (±0.14 SE) and significantly increased with increasing elevation. The trees on the nutrient-rich sites were characterized by higher branch volume, while TBR reached higher values on the acid sites. Site quality class had a significant effect only on the branch volume production. Compared to the timber volume (root mean square error, RMSE = 3.6176; adjusted coefficient of determination, R2adj = 0.7310), the branch volume was relatively poorly described by the model (RMSE = 1.928; R2adj = 0.2517). The volume prediction models show that timber volumes increase with increasing slope and branch volume increases with decreasing site quality class. For effective forest management practice, the highest branch volume in favor of timber production is characterized for lowland forests with stand stocking ≤60% (TBR 1.5), while the highest share of timber volume (TBR 9.5) can be reached in the mountains with a full stand stocking. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Stand Management and Biomass Growth)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of Fertilization Ratios and Frequencies on the Growth and Nutrient Uptake of Magnolia wufengensis (Magnoliaceae)
Forests 2019, 10(1), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10010065
Received: 13 December 2018 / Revised: 11 January 2019 / Accepted: 11 January 2019 / Published: 15 January 2019
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Abstract
Through this study, the most suitable fertilization ratio, amount and frequency were determined, providing a scientific reference for further fertilization management for Magnolia wufengensis (Magnoliaceae) seedlings. Fertilization is an important cultivation and management measure to maintain forest seedling health and rapid growth. However, [...] Read more.
Through this study, the most suitable fertilization ratio, amount and frequency were determined, providing a scientific reference for further fertilization management for Magnolia wufengensis (Magnoliaceae) seedlings. Fertilization is an important cultivation and management measure to maintain forest seedling health and rapid growth. However, improper fertilization can also have unexpected effects: inhibiting seedling growth, increasing the cost of production and contaminating the environment. Thus, to explore the most suitable fertilization treatment for Magnolia wufengensis growth, one-year-old Magnolia wufengensis seedlings and the orthogonal design method were used in this study. Three different fertilization frequencies were used combined with 9 NPK ratios. The growth index, chlorophyll content, nutrient content in tissues, nutrient transport efficiency, nutrient uptake, and soil properties were analyzed. Fertilization can increase chlorophyll content, promoting the vegetative growth and biomass accumulation of Magnolia wufengensis. Fertilization reduced the proportion of root biomass to whole plant biomass, resulting in an increase in stem biomass with little effect on leaf biomass. Additionally, fertilization also increased the proportion of N in roots, P in stems and K in leaves. Under fertilization, the K transport efficiency was higher than that of N and P. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between the nutrient use efficiencies of N and K. Overall, the effects of six fertilizer applications were much better than those of four and eight fertilizer applications on the promotion of vegetative growth, biomass and nutrient accumulation, nutrient uptake and transport efficiency. The results showed that six fertilizer applications with an NPK ratio of 3:2:1 as follows: N application at 480 mg/plant, P application at 320 mg/plant, and K application at 160 mg/plant was the most suitable fertilization method for plant growth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Stand Management and Biomass Growth)
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