The Future of Foods: Recent Advances and Perspectives on Food Quality and Safety

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2021) | Viewed by 41505

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
LAQV/REQUIMTE, Laboratory of Bromatology and Hydrology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal
Interests: analytical methods; food lipids; food technology; food authenticity; food safety; food waste
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We would like to bring to you a very special invitation from Foods.

We are opening a Special Issue dedicated exclusively to the publication of high-quality review papers addressing issues related to food quality and safety, presented by the most experienced and recognized researchers in the field. The highly cited and recognized researchers might apply for full waiver or discount from Foods editorial office.

We expect to assemble a Special Issue that will constitute a marker of the most recent trends of the decade and of the most important achievements that are yet to make a major impact in the future. From basic to high-tech methods that enhance quality and safety and reduce losses and environmental impact, from local foods and techniques to global concerns and novel foods, from nutritional value enhancement to food supplements, we encourage researchers from various fields within the journal’s scope to contribute with review papers highlighting the latest developments in their research field.

Dr. Susana Casal
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food quality
  • Food safety
  • Authenticity
  • Environmental impact
  • New dietary trends
  • Food supplements
  • Novel processing methods
  • Feed trends

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 11247 KiB  
Article
HS-SPME Gas Chromatography Approach for Underivatized Acrylamide Determination in Biscuits
by Cláudia P. Passos, Sílvia Petronilho, António F. Serôdio, Andreia C. M. Neto, Dylan Torres, Alisa Rudnitskaya, Cláudia Nunes, Kristína Kukurová, Zuzana Ciesarová, Sílvia M. Rocha and Manuel A. Coimbra
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2183; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092183 - 14 Sep 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3126
Abstract
Acrylamide (AA) is a food contaminant in thermally processed products that is object of tight control. A simple and easy-to-apply methodology for routine monitoring of AA levels in food products could allow producers to be players in the control of their own products. [...] Read more.
Acrylamide (AA) is a food contaminant in thermally processed products that is object of tight control. A simple and easy-to-apply methodology for routine monitoring of AA levels in food products could allow producers to be players in the control of their own products. In this work, a simple methodology for AA quantification without derivatization was developed for biscuits, for which the benchmark levels recommended by EFSA are 350 µg/kg, and 150 µg/kg for biscuits for infants and young children. Headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) was used in 120 mL screwed-cap vials with a carboxen/polydimetylsiloxane fiber, 4 g of biscuits, and 10 mL of water during 15 min at room temperature under stirring. The addition of 30 mL of propanol under stirring during 15 min at room temperature and 15 min at 60 °C was used to promote AA transfer to the headspace. The fiber exposure was 45 min. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis allowed to obtain an external calibration curve at m/z 71, with linearity R2 > 0.99 and precision RSD < 9%. The detection and quantification limits were 27.4 µg/kg and 91.5 µg/kg, respectively. The methodology was successfully used in biscuits with lower AA amount, where mitigation strategies (asparaginase or pectate) were applied. Full article
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15 pages, 3084 KiB  
Article
A Predictive Strategy Based on Volatile Profile and Chemometric Analysis for Traceability and Authenticity of Sugarcane Honey on the Global Market
by Pedro Silva, Jorge Freitas, Fernando M. Nunes and José S. Câmara
Foods 2021, 10(7), 1559; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071559 - 5 Jul 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2073
Abstract
Sugarcane honey (SCH) is a syrup produced on Madeira Island and recognized by its unique aroma, a complex attribute of quality with an important influence on the final consumer’s acceptance of the product, and determined by a complex mixture of a large number [...] Read more.
Sugarcane honey (SCH) is a syrup produced on Madeira Island and recognized by its unique aroma, a complex attribute of quality with an important influence on the final consumer’s acceptance of the product, and determined by a complex mixture of a large number of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated during its traditional making process and storage. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish the volatile profile of genuine SCH produced by a regional certified producer for seven years and compare it with syrups from non-certified regional producers and with producers from different geographical regions (Spain, Egypt, Brazil and Australia), as a powerful strategy to define the volatomic fingerprint of SCH. Different volatile profiles were recognized for all samples, with 166 VOCs being identified belonging to different chemical classes, including furans, ketones, carboxylic acids, aldehydes and alcohols. Chemometric analysis allowed (i) the differentiation between all syrups, being more pronounced between SCH and other syrups; and (ii) the identification of 32 VOCs as potential markers for the traceability and authenticity of SCH on the global market. Full article
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21 pages, 583 KiB  
Article
Effects of Linseed Meal and Carotenoids from Different Sources on Egg Characteristics, Yolk Fatty Acid and Carotenoid Profile and Lipid Peroxidation
by Tatiana D. Panaite, Violeta Nour, Mihaela Saracila, Raluca P. Turcu, Arabela E. Untea and Petru Al. Vlaicu
Foods 2021, 10(6), 1246; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10061246 - 31 May 2021
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 3044
Abstract
The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of supplementing the diet of laying hens with linseed meal and carotenoids from different sources on egg characteristics, yolk fatty acid and carotenoid profile, and lipid peroxidation. A 4-week experiment was conducted on 168 Lohmann [...] Read more.
The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of supplementing the diet of laying hens with linseed meal and carotenoids from different sources on egg characteristics, yolk fatty acid and carotenoid profile, and lipid peroxidation. A 4-week experiment was conducted on 168 Lohmann Brown layers (43 weeks of age), assigned to four dietary treatments (42 hens/group; 21 replicate/groups with 2 birds/pen) consisting of a control diet (C) and three diets simultaneously supplemented with 6% linseed meal and 2% dried kapia pepper (E1), 2% dried sea buckthorn pomace (E2) and 2% dried carrot (E3). Every 2 weeks, 18 eggs/group/period were collected randomly from each group and used to determine the egg quality and nutritional parameters. The results showed that dietary linseed meal and carotenoids sources improved egg color, carotenoids’ accumulation in egg yolk and fatty acid profile, especially the n-3 PUFA content. Dietary carotenoids supplementation reduced, n-6/n-3 ratio, cholesterol content of the egg yolk and improved yolk pH, egg thickness and yolk oxidative stability. In conclusion, the use of these sources of carotenoids in the linseed meal enriched diets could be an effective way to improve the nutritional properties of the eggs without affecting their quality and consumer’s safety. Full article
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Review

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16 pages, 658 KiB  
Review
Interactions between Microbial Food Safety and Environmental Sustainability in the Fresh Produce Supply Chain
by Francisco López-Gálvez, Perla A. Gómez, Francisco Artés, Francisco Artés-Hernández and Encarna Aguayo
Foods 2021, 10(7), 1655; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071655 - 17 Jul 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 4551
Abstract
Improving the environmental sustainability of the food supply chain will help to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This environmental sustainability is related to different SDGs, but mainly to SDG 2 (Zero Hunger), SDG 12 (Responsible Production and Consumption), SDG 13 [...] Read more.
Improving the environmental sustainability of the food supply chain will help to achieve the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). This environmental sustainability is related to different SDGs, but mainly to SDG 2 (Zero Hunger), SDG 12 (Responsible Production and Consumption), SDG 13 (Climate Action), and SDG 15 (Life on Land). The strategies and measures used to improve this aspect of the food supply chain must remain in balance with other sustainability aspects (economic and social). In this framework, the interactions and possible conflicts between food supply chain safety and sustainability need to be assessed. Although priority must be given to safety aspects, food safety policies should be calibrated in order to avoid unnecessary deleterious effects on the environment. In the present review, a number of potential tensions and/or disagreements between the microbial safety and environmental sustainability of the fresh produce supply chain are identified and discussed. The addressed issues are spread throughout the food supply chain, from primary production to the end-of-life of the products, and also include the handling and processing industry, retailers, and consumers. Interactions of fresh produce microbial safety with topics such as food waste, supply chain structure, climate change, and use of resources have been covered. Finally, approaches and strategies that will prove useful to solve or mitigate the potential contradictions between fresh produce safety and sustainability are described and discussed. Upon analyzing the interplay between microbial safety and the environmental sustainability of the fresh produce supply chain, it becomes clear that decisions that are taken to ensure fresh produce safety must consider the possible effects on environmental, economic, and social sustainability aspects. To manage these interactions, a global approach considering the interconnections between human activities, animals, and the environment will be required. Full article
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24 pages, 1089 KiB  
Review
Recent Advances toward the Application of Non-Thermal Technologies in Food Processing: An Insight on the Bioaccessibility of Health-Related Constituents in Plant-Based Products
by Gloria López-Gámez, Pedro Elez-Martínez, Olga Martín-Belloso and Robert Soliva-Fortuny
Foods 2021, 10(7), 1538; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071538 - 3 Jul 2021
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 3757
Abstract
Fruits and vegetables are rich sources of bioactive compounds and micronutrients. Some of the most abundant are phenols and carotenoids, whose consumption contributes to preventing the occurrence of degenerative diseases. Recent research has shown the potential of non-thermal processing technologies, especially pulsed electric [...] Read more.
Fruits and vegetables are rich sources of bioactive compounds and micronutrients. Some of the most abundant are phenols and carotenoids, whose consumption contributes to preventing the occurrence of degenerative diseases. Recent research has shown the potential of non-thermal processing technologies, especially pulsed electric fields (PEF), ultrasounds (US), and high pressure processing (HPP), to trigger the accumulation of bioactive compounds through the induction of a plant stress response. Furthermore, these technologies together with high pressure homogenization (HPH) also cause microstructural changes in both vegetable tissues and plant-based beverages. These modifications could enhance carotenoids, phenolic compounds, vitamins and minerals extractability, and/or bioaccessibility, which is essential to exert their positive effects on health. Nevertheless, information explaining bioaccessibility changes after non-thermal technologies is limited. Therefore, further research on food processing strategies using non-thermal technologies offers prospects to develop plant-based products with enhanced bioaccessibility of their bioactive compounds and micronutrients. In this review, we attempt to provide updated information regarding the main effects of PEF, HPP, HPH, and US on health-related compounds bioaccessibility from different vegetable matrices and the causes underlying these changes. Additionally, we propose future research on the relationship between the bioaccessibility of bioactive compounds and micronutrients, matrix structure, and non-thermal processing. Full article
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33 pages, 2173 KiB  
Review
Tailoring the Structure of Lipids, Oleogels and Fat Replacers by Different Approaches for Solving the Trans-Fat Issue—A Review
by Mishela Temkov and Vlad Mureșan
Foods 2021, 10(6), 1376; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10061376 - 14 Jun 2021
Cited by 34 | Viewed by 8966
Abstract
The issue of the adverse effects of trans-fatty acids has become more transparent in recent years due to researched evidence of their link with coronary diseases, obesity or type 2 diabetes. Apart from conventional techniques for lipid structuring, novel nonconventional approaches for [...] Read more.
The issue of the adverse effects of trans-fatty acids has become more transparent in recent years due to researched evidence of their link with coronary diseases, obesity or type 2 diabetes. Apart from conventional techniques for lipid structuring, novel nonconventional approaches for the same matter, such as enzymatic interesterification, genetic modification, oleogelation or using components from nonlipid origins such as fat replacers have been proposed, leading to a product with a healthier nutritional profile (low in saturated fats, zero trans fats and high in polyunsaturated fats). However, replacing conventional fat with a structured lipid or with a fat mimetic can alternate some of the technological operations or the food quality impeding consumers’ acceptance. In this review, we summarize the research of the different existing methods (including conventional and nonconventional) for tailoring lipids in order to give a concise and critical overview in the field. Specifically, raw materials, methods for their production and the potential of food application, together with the properties of new product formulations, have been discussed. Future perspectives, such as the possibility of bioengineering approaches and the valorization of industrial side streams in the framework of Green Production and Circular Economy in the production of tailored lipids, have been highlighted. Additionally, a schematic diagram classifying conventional and nonconventional techniques is proposed based on the processing steps included in tailored lipid production as a convenient and straightforward tool for research and industry searching for healthy, sustainable and zero trans edible lipid system alternatives. Full article
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21 pages, 920 KiB  
Review
Variability of Chemical Profile in Almonds (Prunus dulcis) of Different Cultivars and Origins
by Ana Beltrán Sanahuja, Salvador E. Maestre Pérez, Nuria Grané Teruel, Arantzazu Valdés García and María Soledad Prats Moya
Foods 2021, 10(1), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010153 - 13 Jan 2021
Cited by 30 | Viewed by 5436
Abstract
Almonds show a great variability in their chemical composition. This variability is a result of the existence of a diverse range of almond cultivars, the self-incompatibility of most almond cultivars, and the heterogeneous harvesting conditions found around the different locations where almons are [...] Read more.
Almonds show a great variability in their chemical composition. This variability is a result of the existence of a diverse range of almond cultivars, the self-incompatibility of most almond cultivars, and the heterogeneous harvesting conditions found around the different locations where almons are grown. In the last years, the discrimination among almond cultivars has been the focal point of some research studies to avoid fraud in protected geographical indications in almond products and also for selecting the best cultivars for a specific food application or the most interesting ones from a nutritional point of view. In this work, a revision of the recent research works related to the chemical characterization and classification of almond cultivars from different geographical origins has been carried out. The content of macronutrients, tocopherols, phytosterols, polyphenols, minerals, amino acids, and volatile compounds together with DNA fingerprint have been reported as possible cultivar and origin markers. The analysis of the results showed that no individual almond compound could be considered a universal biomarker to find differences among different almond cultivars. Hence, an adequate selection of variables or the employment of metabolomics and the application of multivariate statistical techniques is necessary when classification studies are carried out to obtain valuable results. Meanwhile, DNA fingerprinting is the perfect tool for compared cultivars based on their genetic origin. Full article
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33 pages, 615 KiB  
Review
Citrinin in Foods and Supplements: A Review of Occurrence and Analytical Methodologies
by Liliana J. G. Silva, André M. P. T. Pereira, Angelina Pena and Celeste M. Lino
Foods 2021, 10(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010014 - 23 Dec 2020
Cited by 49 | Viewed by 9154
Abstract
Citrinin (CIT) deserves attention due to its known toxic effects in mammalian species and its widespread occurrence in food commodities, often along with ochratoxin A, another nephrotoxic mycotoxin. Human exposure, a key element in assessing risk related to food contaminants, depends upon mycotoxin [...] Read more.
Citrinin (CIT) deserves attention due to its known toxic effects in mammalian species and its widespread occurrence in food commodities, often along with ochratoxin A, another nephrotoxic mycotoxin. Human exposure, a key element in assessing risk related to food contaminants, depends upon mycotoxin contamination levels in food and on food consumption. Commercial supplements, commonly designated as red rice, usually used in daily diets in Asiatic countries due to their medicinal properties, may pose a health problem as a result of high CIT levels. In addition to the worldwide occurrence of CIT in foods and supplements, a wide range of several analytical and detection techniques with high sensitivity, used for evaluation of CIT, are reviewed and discussed in this manuscript. This review addresses the scientific literature regarding the presence of CIT in foods of either vegetable or animal origin, as well as in supplements. On what concerns analytical methodologies, sample extraction methods, such as shaking extraction and ultrasonic assisted extraction (UAE), clean-up methods, such as liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), solid phase extraction (SPE) and Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe (QuECHERS), and detection and quantification methods, such as thin layer chromatography (TLC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), capillary electrophoresis (CE), biosensors, and ELISA, are also reviewed. Full article
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