Special Issue "New Knowledge in Analytical, Technological and Biological Aspects of the Maillard Reaction"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Cristina Delgado-Andrade

Guest Editor
Institute of Food Science, Technology and Nutrition (ICTAN), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Madrid, Spain
Interests: Maillard reaction; glycation; chemical process contaminants; acrylamide; bioaccesibility; in vivo effects
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Maillard reaction is one of those wide fields of research where the sum of interdisciplinary efforts of scientists from Food Science and Technology, Biochemistry and Analytical and Biomedical Sciences are critical to generate relevant knowledge. Despite several decades of investigation, many tasks remain to be done concerning the food matrix effects on the formation of Maillard-derived compounds and mitigation strategies, to elucidate the chemical structures of many of them and relate it with specific physiological actions or to develop reliable and standardized chromatographic methods for analysis in foods and biological fluids. Aimed to increase the knowledge on the formation of these structures within foods, their biological actions and thus contributing to their health-risk assessment, the purpose of this special issue is collecting latest and most interesting research on Maillard reaction products (MRP) formation in common and new designed foods, innovative tools to prevent their formation, as well as evaluating the consequences of their consumption and bioactivity.

Dr. Cristina Delgado-Andrade
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Maillard reaction products;
  • advanced glycation end-products;
  • antiglycation strategies;
  • biological actions;
  • functional properties;
  • analytical tools

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
New Knowledge in Analytical, Technological, and Biological Aspects of the Maillard Reaction
Foods 2017, 6(6), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6060040 - 26 May 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
The Maillard reaction (MR) is the non-enzymatic browning reaction that can occur both in foods and in living beings.[...] Full article

Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Effect of Different Flours on the Formation of Hydroxymethylfurfural, Furfural, and Dicarbonyl Compounds in Heated Glucose/Flour Systems
Foods 2017, 6(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6020014 - 16 Feb 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
Traditional cereal-based foods usually include wheat flour in their formulations; however, the search for new products with new ingredients providing different properties to foods is widely pursued by food companies. Replacement of wheat by other flours can modify both nutritional properties and organoleptic [...] Read more.
Traditional cereal-based foods usually include wheat flour in their formulations; however, the search for new products with new ingredients providing different properties to foods is widely pursued by food companies. Replacement of wheat by other flours can modify both nutritional properties and organoleptic characteristics of the final baked food, but can also impact the formation of potentially harmful compounds. The effect of the type of flour on the formation of furfurals and dicarbonyl compounds was studied in a dough model system during baking that contains water or glucose in order to promote the Maillard reaction and caramelization. The formation of methylglyoxal and glyoxal was significantly reduced in spelt and teff formulations compared to wheat flour formulations, respectively. In contrast, samples formulated with oat, teff, and rye showed a significant increase in the levels of 3-deoxyglucosone. Similarly, spelt and teff formulations presented significantly higher concentrations of hydroxymethylfurfural, and spelt, teff, and rye presented higher concentrations of furfural. Therefore, the formation of process contaminants and undesirable compounds in new food products formulated with different flours replacing the traditional wheat flour should be considered carefully in terms of food safety. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of the Availability and Antioxidant Capacity of Maillard Compounds Present in Bread Crust: Studies in Caco-2 Cells
Foods 2017, 6(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6010005 - 11 Jan 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
Bread crust is one of the major contributors to the intake of Maillard reaction products (MRP). MRP improve the organoleptic properties of foods and can provide biological actions such as antioxidant properties. The transport and availability of Amadori compounds (measured as furosine) and [...] Read more.
Bread crust is one of the major contributors to the intake of Maillard reaction products (MRP). MRP improve the organoleptic properties of foods and can provide biological actions such as antioxidant properties. The transport and availability of Amadori compounds (measured as furosine) and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF)—early and intermediary MRP—from enzymatically digested bread crust (BC) and from its soluble low-molecular weight (LMW) and high-molecular weight (HMW) fractions were investigated in the Caco-2 cell line. The absorption of the early and final MRP pool was tested by measuring the absorbance recovery (280 and 420 nm). The ability of soluble BC or its fractions to lessen the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was examined. Amadori compounds (furosine) were transported across Caco-2 cell monolayers from the soluble BC in percentages ranging between 40% and 56%; the lower amount of the compound supplied, the higher transport rate. However, HMF transport rate (35%) was unaffected by the initial amount of the compound. Amadori compounds and HMF contained in the LMW fraction were more efficiently transported than those present in the HMW fraction, suggesting improved absorption when supplied as free forms or linked to LMW compounds. Absorbance recovery at 280 nm was higher from the LMW fraction, whereas higher recovery was detected for the HMW fraction at 420 nm. The digested BC—but not its isolated fractions—was able to significantly reduce ROS production at basal conditions and after subjecting cells to an oxidant. A clear positive action of BC on the antioxidant defence is manifested, seemingly attributable to the combined presence of soluble LMW and HMW products. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Evolution of the Maillard Reaction in Glutamine or Arginine-Dextrinomaltose Model Systems
Foods 2016, 5(4), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods5040086 - 07 Dec 2016
Cited by 5
Abstract
Enteral formulas are foods designed for medical uses to feed patients who are unable to eat normally. They are prepared by mixing proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates and fats and submitted to sterilization. During thermal treatment, the Maillard reaction takes place through the reaction [...] Read more.
Enteral formulas are foods designed for medical uses to feed patients who are unable to eat normally. They are prepared by mixing proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates and fats and submitted to sterilization. During thermal treatment, the Maillard reaction takes place through the reaction of animo acids with reducing sugars. Thus, although glutamine and arginine are usually added to improve the nutritional value of enteral formulas, their final concentration may vary. Thus, in the present paper the early, intermediate, and advanced states of the Maillard reaction were studied in model systems by measuring loss of free amino acids through the decrease of fluorescence intensity with o-phtaldialdehyde (OPA), 5-Hydroximethylfurfural (HMF), furfural, glucosylisomaltol, fluorescence, and absorbance at 420 nm. The systems were prepared by mixing glutamine or arginine with dextrinomaltose (similar ingredients to those used in special enteral formula), and heated at 100 °C, 120 °C and 140 °C for 0 to 30 min. The recorded changes in the concentration of furanic compounds was only useful for longer heating times of high temperatures, while absorbance and fluorescence measurements were useful in all the assayed conditions. In addition, easiness and sensitivity of absorbance and fluorescence make them useful techniques that could be implemented as indicators for monitoring the manufacture of special enteral formulas. Glucosylisomaltol is a useful indicator to monitor the manufacture of glutamine-enriched enteral formulas. Full article

Review

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Open AccessReview
How Can Diet Affect the Accumulation of Advanced Glycation End-Products in the Human Body?
Foods 2016, 5(4), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods5040084 - 06 Dec 2016
Cited by 26
Abstract
The accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is associated with the complications of diabetes, kidney disease, metabolic disorders and degenerative diseases. It is recognized that the pool of glycation products found in the human body comes not only from an endogenous formation, [...] Read more.
The accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is associated with the complications of diabetes, kidney disease, metabolic disorders and degenerative diseases. It is recognized that the pool of glycation products found in the human body comes not only from an endogenous formation, but also from a dietary exposure to exogenous AGEs. In recent years, the development of pharmacologically-active ingredients aimed at inhibiting endogenous glycation has not been successful. Since the accumulation of AGEs in the human body appears to be progressive throughout life, an early preventive action against glycation could be effective through dietary adjustments or supplementation with purified micronutrients. The present article provides an overview of current dietary strategies tested either in vitro, in vivo or both to reduce the endogenous formation of AGEs and to limit exposure to food AGEs. Full article
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