Special Issue "Food Coatings"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Sheryl Barringer

Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences, The Ohio State University, 2015 Fyffe Road, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Foods are frequently coated to improve color, taste, texture, appearance or shelf life. Coatings can be liquid or particulate, and can be used for a range of purposes, such as to apply vitamins, add functional benefits (such as providing a moisture barrier), keep pieces separate, add antioxidants to the surface or create an interesting appearance. Frequently, the coating must be cooled, heat-set, dried or crystallized to produce adequate adhesion. The setting step is critical and determines the stability and functionality of the coating. Creating a good barrier can be difficult. There are many challenges in applying coatings consistently and reliably. Small changes in ingredients or external conditions can greatly affect the final quality and stability of the coating. Coating experts rely more on accumulated experience than on hard calculations to design and operate a coating process. This Special Issue will discuss many of the challenges and current practices of coating of foods.

Prof. Dr. Sheryl Barringer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • food coatings
  • coating techniques
  • coating ingredients
  • food seasoning
  • spray coating
  • sensory and nutritional evaluation of coated foods

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Investigation of Carboxymethyl Cellulose (CMC) on Mechanical Properties of Cold Water Fish Gelatin Biodegradable Edible Films
Received: 11 March 2017 / Revised: 26 March 2017 / Accepted: 27 March 2017 / Published: 27 May 2017
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (640 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The tendency to use biocompatible packages, such as biodegradable films, is growing since they contain natural materials, are recyclable and do not cause environmental pollution. In this research, cold water fish gelatin and carboxymethyl cellulose were combined for use in edible films. Due [...] Read more.
The tendency to use biocompatible packages, such as biodegradable films, is growing since they contain natural materials, are recyclable and do not cause environmental pollution. In this research, cold water fish gelatin and carboxymethyl cellulose were combined for use in edible films. Due to its unique properties, gelatin is widely used in creating gel, and in restructuring, stabilizing, emulsifying, and forming foam and film in food industries. This research for the first time modified and improved the mechanical properties of cold water fish gelatin films in combination with carboxymethyl cellulose. Cold water fish gelatin films along with carboxymethyl cellulose with concentrations of 0%, 5%, 10%, 20% and 50% were prepared using the casting method. The mechanical properties were tested by the American National Standard Method. Studying the absorption isotherm of the resulting composite films specified that the humidity of single-layer water decreased (p < 0.05) and caused a reduction in the equilibrium moisture of these films. In the mechanical testing of the composite films, the tensile strength and Young’s modulus significantly increased and the elongation percent significantly decreased with the increase in the concentration of carboxymethyl cellulose. Considering the biodegradability of the films and the improvement of their mechanical properties by carboxymethyl cellulose, this kind of packaging can be used in different industries, especially the food industry, as an edible coating for packaging food and agricultural crops. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle
Physical and Antimicrobial Properties of Starch-PVA Blend Films as Affected by the Incorporation of Natural Antimicrobial Agents
Received: 9 August 2015 / Revised: 27 November 2015 / Accepted: 21 December 2015 / Published: 26 December 2015
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (3558 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this work, active films based on starch and PVA (S:PVA ratio of 2:1) were developed by incorporating neem (NO) and oregano essential oils (OEO). First, a screening of the antifungal effectiveness of different natural extracts (echinacea, horsetail extract, liquid smoke and neem [...] Read more.
In this work, active films based on starch and PVA (S:PVA ratio of 2:1) were developed by incorporating neem (NO) and oregano essential oils (OEO). First, a screening of the antifungal effectiveness of different natural extracts (echinacea, horsetail extract, liquid smoke and neem seed oil) against two fungus (P. expansum and A. niger) was carried out. The effect of NO and OEO incorporation on the films’ physical and antimicrobial properties was analyzed. Only composite films containing OEO exhibited antibacterial and antifungal activity. Antibacterial activity occurred at low OEO concentration (6.7%), while antifungal effect required higher doses of OEO in the films. Incorporation of oils did not notably affect the water sorption capacity and water vapor barrier properties of S-PVA films, but reduced their transparency and gloss, especially at the highest concentrations. The mechanical response of the S-PVA films was also negatively affected by oil incorporation but this was only relevant at the highest oil ratio (22%). S-PVA films with 6.7% of OEO exhibited the best physical properties, without significant differences with respect to the S-PVA matrix, while exhibiting antibacterial activity. Thus, the use of OEO as a natural antimicrobial incorporated into starch-PVA films represents a good and novel alternative in food packaging applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle
Water Sorption Isotherm of Pea Starch Edible Films and Prediction Models
Received: 8 October 2015 / Revised: 16 December 2015 / Accepted: 17 December 2015 / Published: 24 December 2015
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1135 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The moisture sorption isotherm of pea starch films prepared with various glycerol contents as plasticizer was investigated at different storage relative humidities (11%–96% RH) and at 5 ± 1, 15 ± 1, 25 ± 1 and 40 ± 1 °C by using gravimetric [...] Read more.
The moisture sorption isotherm of pea starch films prepared with various glycerol contents as plasticizer was investigated at different storage relative humidities (11%–96% RH) and at 5 ± 1, 15 ± 1, 25 ± 1 and 40 ± 1 °C by using gravimetric method. The results showed that the equilibrium moisture content of all films increased substantially above aw = 0.6. Films plasticized with glycerol, under all temperatures and RH conditions (11%–96%), adsorbed more moisture resulting in higher equilibrium moisture contents. Reduction of the temperature enhanced the equilibrium moisture content and monolayer water of the films. The obtained experimental data were fitted to different models including two-parameter equations (Oswin, Henderson, Brunauer–Emmitt–Teller (BET), Flory–Huggins, and Iglesias–Chirife), three-parameter equations Guggenhiem–Anderson–deBoer (GAB), Ferro–Fontan, and Lewicki) and a four-parameter equation (Peleg). The three-parameter Lewicki model was found to be the best-fitted model for representing the experimental data within the studied temperatures and whole range of relative humidities (11%–98%). Addition of glycerol increased the net isosteric heat of moisture sorption of pea starch film. The results provide important information with estimating of stability and functional characteristics of the films in various environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Chitosan Coating on the Postharvest Quality and Antioxidant Enzyme System Response of Strawberry Fruit during Cold Storage
Foods 2015, 4(4), 501-523; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods4040501
Received: 13 August 2015 / Revised: 10 September 2015 / Accepted: 23 September 2015 / Published: 29 September 2015
Cited by 29 | PDF Full-text (564 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effectiveness of chitosan fruit coating to delay the qualitative and nutraceutical traits of three strawberry cultivars, namely “Candonga”, “Jonica” and “Sabrina”, as well as the effects of chitosan on antioxidant enzymes were evaluated. The fruits were coated with 1% and 2% chitosan [...] Read more.
The effectiveness of chitosan fruit coating to delay the qualitative and nutraceutical traits of three strawberry cultivars, namely “Candonga”, “Jonica” and “Sabrina”, as well as the effects of chitosan on antioxidant enzymes were evaluated. The fruits were coated with 1% and 2% chitosan solution and stored at 2 °C for nine days. Samples were taken every three days. Physico-chemical (weight loss, soluble solid content and titratable acidity) and nutraceutical (total polyphenol, anthocyanin, flavonoid, ascorbic acid content and antioxidant capacity) properties along with the enzymatic activity (catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), polyphenol oxidase (PPO), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and lipoxygenase (LOX)) were evaluated. Chitosan treatment significantly reduced water loss and delayed the qualitative changes in color, titratable acidity and ascorbic acid content in dose- and cultivar-dependent manners. Additionally, changes in the total polyphenol, anthocyanin and flavonoid contents and the antioxidant capacity of chitosan-coated strawberry fruits were delayed. Chitosan coating enhanced the activity of some antioxidant enzymes, preventing flesh browning and reducing membrane damage. A global view of the responses of the three strawberry cultivars to chitosan coating and storage temperature was obtained using principal component analysis. Chitosan-coated fruit exhibited a slower rate of deterioration, compared to uncoated fruit in all tested cultivars. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Coatings)
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