Special Issue "Bioavailability and Bioactivity of Dietary Polyphenols"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 December 2021) | Viewed by 2795

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Abishek Santhakumar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Biomedical Sciences, Charles Sturt University, Wagga, Australia
Interests: polyphenols; antioxidants; cardiovascular disease; metabolic diseases; oxidative stress; platelets
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. José M. Álvarez-Suarez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias Aplicadas (FICA), Universidad de Las Américas, Quito, Ecuador
Interests: antioxidant activity; antimicrobial activities; polyphenol-rich foods; berries; honey
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polyphenols are dietary micronutrients that have been demonstrated to play an important role in alleviating risk factors associated with several chronic conditions, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. Nevertheless, the extent of their impact on disease-related biological/mechanistic pathways in vivo is strongly correlated to their bioavailability and bioactivity. Due to the rapid elimination, high metabolic rate, and poor intestinal absorption of polyphenols, a clear understanding of their bioavailability is essential to validate their health claims. This Special Issue is open to submissions that explore the bioavailability and/or bio-accessibility of polyphenols through in vitro, ex vivo, or in vivo clinical trials; as well as studies examining the bioactivity of polyphenols that target specific mechanistic pathways of inflammation and oxidative stress. Literature reviews, including systematic quantitative reviews, are welcomed. 

Dr. Abishek Santhakumar
Prof. Dr. José M. Álvarez-Suarez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • polyphenols
  • bioavailability
  • bioactivity
  • inflammation
  • oxidative stress

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
A New Food Ingredient Rich in Bioaccessible (Poly)Phenols (and Glucosinolates) Obtained from Stabilized Broccoli Stalks
Foods 2022, 11(12), 1734; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11121734 - 14 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) stalks account for up to 35% of the broccoli harvest remains with the concomitant generation of unused waste that needs recovery to contribute to the sustainability of the system. However, due to its phytochemical composition, rich [...] Read more.
Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) stalks account for up to 35% of the broccoli harvest remains with the concomitant generation of unused waste that needs recovery to contribute to the sustainability of the system. However, due to its phytochemical composition, rich in bioactive (poly)phenols and glucosinolates, as well as other nutrients, the development of valorization alternatives as a source of functional ingredients must be considered. In this situation, the present work aims to develop/obtain a new ingredient rich in bioactive compounds from broccoli, stabilizing them and reducing their degradation to further guarantee a high bioaccessibility, which has also been studied. The phytochemical profile of lyophilized and thermally treated (low-temperature and descending gradient temperature treatments), together with the digested materials (simulated static in vitro digestion) were analysed by HPLC-PDA-ESI-MSn and UHPLC-3Q-MS/MS. Broccoli stalks and co-products were featured by containing phenolic compounds (mainly hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and glycosylated flavonols) and glucosinolates. The highest content of organosulfur compounds corresponding to the cores of the broccoli stalks treated by applying a drying descendant temperature gradient (aliphatic 18.05 g/kg dw and indolic 1.61 g/kg dw, on average, while the breakdown products were more abundant in the bark ongoing low temperature drying 11.29 g/kg dw, on average). On the other hand, for phenolics, feruloylquinic, and sinapoylquinic acid derivatives of complete broccoli stalk and bark, were more abundant when applying low-temperature drying (14.48 and 28.22 g/kg dw, on average, respectively), while higher concentrations were found in the core treated with decreasing temperature gradients (9.99 and 26.26 g/kg dw, on average, respectively). When analysing the bioaccessibility of these compounds, it was found that low-temperature stabilization of the core samples provided the material with the highest content of bioactives including antioxidant phenolics (13.6 and 33.9 g/kg dw of feruloylquinic and sinapoylquinic acids, on average, respectively) and sulforaphane (4.1 g/kg dw, on average). These processing options enabled us to obtain a new product or ingredient rich in bioactive and bioaccessible compounds based on broccoli stalks with the potential for antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacities of interest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioavailability and Bioactivity of Dietary Polyphenols)
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Review

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Review
Bioaccessibility and Bioactivity of Cereal Polyphenols: A Review
Foods 2021, 10(7), 1595; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071595 - 09 Jul 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1731
Abstract
Cereal bioactive compounds, especially polyphenols, are known to possess a wide range of disease preventive properties that are attributed to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. However, due to their low plasma concentrations after oral intake, there is controversy regarding their therapeutic benefits in [...] Read more.
Cereal bioactive compounds, especially polyphenols, are known to possess a wide range of disease preventive properties that are attributed to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. However, due to their low plasma concentrations after oral intake, there is controversy regarding their therapeutic benefits in vivo. Within the gastrointestinal tract, some cereal polyphenols are absorbed in the small intestine, with the majority accumulating and metabolised by the colonic microbiota. Chemical and enzymatic processes occurring during gastrointestinal digestion modulate the bioactivity and bioaccessibility of phenolic compounds. The interactions between the cereal polyphenols and the intestinal epithelium allow the modulation of intestinal barrier function through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activity and mucin production thereby improving intestinal health. The intestinal microbiota is believed to have a reciprocal interaction with polyphenols, wherein the microbiome produces bioactive and bioaccessible phenolic metabolites and the phenolic compound, in turn, modifies the microbiome composition favourably. Thus, the microbiome presents a key link between polyphenol consumption and the health benefits observed in metabolic conditions in numerous studies. This review will explore the therapeutic value of cereal polyphenols in conjunction with their bioaccessibility, impact on intestinal barrier function and interaction with the microbiome coupled with plasma anti-inflammatory effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioavailability and Bioactivity of Dietary Polyphenols)
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