Special Issue "Innovative Preservation Technology for the Fresh Fruit and Vegetables"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Bernardo Pace
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Institute of Sciences of Food Production, National Research Council of Italy
Interests: storage condition; nutritional and sensorial evaluation of fruit and vegetables; active packaging; modified atmosphere; postharvest physiology; chemical and physical treatment; shelf-life; volatile compounds as quality markers; logistic solutions; non-destructive automatic quality evaluation; cold chain
Dr. Maria Cefola
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Sciences of Food Production, National Research Council of Italy
Interests: quality of fresh and fresh cut fruits and vegetables; innovative pre-treatment; packaging and/or storage condition; modified and controlled atmosphere; logistic cold chain; innovative transport system; no-destructive systems for quality evaluation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The preservation of freshness of fruits and vegetables until their consumption is the aim of many research activities. The quality losses of fresh fruit and vegetables during cold chain, frequently, are attributable to an inappropriate use of postharvest technologies. Moreover, especially when fresh produce are transported to distant markets, it is necessary to adopt proper storage solutions in order to preserve the initial quality.

Nowadays, for each step of the supply chain (packing house, cold storage rooms, precooling center, refrigerate transport, and distribution), innovative preservation technologies are available that, alone or in combination, could preserve the fresh products in order to maintain the principal quality and nutritional characteristics. In this Special Issue, these preservation technologies will be described, highlighting their effect on quality maintenance.

Dr. Bernardo Pace
Dr. Maria Cefola
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cold Chain
  • Controlled atmosphere
  • Ethylene and oxygen scavenger
  • Intelligent and active packaging
  • Modified atmosphere
  • Ozone
  • Physical and chemical treatments
  • Storage temperature

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Combined Effect of Dipping in Oxalic or in Citric Acid and Low O2 Modified Atmosphere, to Preserve the Quality of Fresh-Cut Lettuce during Storage
Foods 2020, 9(8), 988; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9080988 - 24 Jul 2020
Abstract
Leaf edge browning is the main factor affecting fresh-cut lettuce marketability. Dipping in organic acids as well as the low O2 modified atmosphere packaging (MAP), can be used as anti-browning technologies. In the present research paper, the proper oxalic acid (OA) concentration, [...] Read more.
Leaf edge browning is the main factor affecting fresh-cut lettuce marketability. Dipping in organic acids as well as the low O2 modified atmosphere packaging (MAP), can be used as anti-browning technologies. In the present research paper, the proper oxalic acid (OA) concentration, able to reduce respiration rate of fresh-cut iceberg lettuce, and the suitable packaging materials aimed to maintaining a low O2 during storage, were selected. Moreover, the combined effect of dipping (in OA or in citric acid) and packaging in low O2 was investigated during the storage of fresh-cut iceberg lettuce for 14 days. Results showed a significant effect of 5 mM OA on respiration rate delay. In addition, polypropylene/polyamide (PP/PA) was select as the most suitable packaging material to be used in low O2 MAP. Combining OA dipping with low O2 MAP using PP/PA as material, resulted able to reduce leaf edge browning, respiration rate, weight loss and electrolyte leakage, preserving the visual quality of fresh-cut lettuce until 8 days at 8 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Preservation Technology for the Fresh Fruit and Vegetables)
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Open AccessArticle
Active Cardboard Box with Smart Internal Lining Based on Encapsulated Essential Oils for Enhancing the Shelf Life of Fresh Mandarins
Foods 2020, 9(5), 590; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050590 - 06 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Mandarins are usually sold in bulk and refrigerated in open cardboard boxes with a relatively short shelf-life (12–15 days) due to physiological and pathological disorders (rot, dehydration, internal breakdown, etc.). The influence of a controlled release of essential oils (EOs) from an active [...] Read more.
Mandarins are usually sold in bulk and refrigerated in open cardboard boxes with a relatively short shelf-life (12–15 days) due to physiological and pathological disorders (rot, dehydration, internal breakdown, etc.). The influence of a controlled release of essential oils (EOs) from an active packaging (including β-cyclodextrin-EOs inclusion complex) was studied on the mandarin quality stability, comparing different sized cardboard trays and boxes, either non-active or active, at the pilot plant scale (experiment 1; commercialization simulation at room temperature after a previous simulation of short transportation/storage of 5 days at 8 °C). Then, the selected package was further validated at the industrial scale (experiment 2; cold storage at 8 °C up to 21 days). Among package types, the active large box (≈10 kg fruit per box) better maintained the mandarin quality, extending the shelf life from two weeks (non-active large box) to three weeks at room temperature. Particularly, the active large box highly controlled microbial growth (up to two log units), reduced weight losses (by 1.6-fold), reduced acidity, and increased soluble solids (highly appreciated in sensory analyses), while it minimized colour and controlled firmness changes after three weeks. Such trends were also observed during the validation experiment, extending the shelf life (based on sensory quality) from 14 to at least 21 days. In conclusion, the mandarin’s shelf life with this active cardboard box format was extended more than one week at 8 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Preservation Technology for the Fresh Fruit and Vegetables)
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Open AccessArticle
Combination of Low Fluctuation of Temperature with TiO2 Photocatalytic/Ozone for the Quality Maintenance of Postharvest Peach
Foods 2020, 9(2), 234; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9020234 - 21 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Chilling injury, tissue browning, and fungal infection are the major problems of peach fruit during post-harvest storage. In this study, a precise temperature control cold storage with low-temperature fluctuation (LFT) and internal circulation flow system is designed. An ozone (O3) generator [...] Read more.
Chilling injury, tissue browning, and fungal infection are the major problems of peach fruit during post-harvest storage. In this study, a precise temperature control cold storage with low-temperature fluctuation (LFT) and internal circulation flow system is designed. An ozone (O3) generator and a (titanium dioxide) TiO2 photocatalytic reactor were applied to cold storage to investigate the variation of LFT combined with ozone fumigation and a TiO2 photocatalytic reactor in the efficiency of delaying ripening and maintaining peach fruit quality. Results showed that the temperature fluctuation with the improved control system was only ±0.1 to ±0.2 °C compared with that of ±0.5 to ±1.0 °C in conventional cold storage. LFT significantly reduced the chilling injury of peach fruit during storage. Although LFT combined with fumigation of 200 mg m−3 ozone periodical treatment slightly damaged the peach fruit after 40 d of storage, its combination with the TiO2 photocatalytic system significantly improved the postharvest storage quality of the fruit. This treatment maintained higher titratable acidity (TA), total soluble solids (TSS), better firmness, color, microstructure, and lower decay rate, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities, total phenol accumulation, respiratory intensity, ethylene production, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content during 60 d of storage. All the results show that LFT combined with the TiO2 photocatalytic system might be a promising technology for quality preservation in peach fruit storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Preservation Technology for the Fresh Fruit and Vegetables)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Cutting Styles on Quality and Antioxidant Activity of Stored Fresh-Cut Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) Cultivars
Foods 2019, 8(12), 674; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8120674 - 12 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The effect of cutting styles (slice, pie, and shred) on the quality characteristics and antioxidant activity of purple and yellow flesh sweet potato cultivars during six days of storage at 4 °C was investigated. The results indicated that the sliced and pie samples [...] Read more.
The effect of cutting styles (slice, pie, and shred) on the quality characteristics and antioxidant activity of purple and yellow flesh sweet potato cultivars during six days of storage at 4 °C was investigated. The results indicated that the sliced and pie samples showed no significant difference (p > 0.05) on the firmness, weight loss, and vitamin C content compared with the whole sweet potato in both cultivars during storage. The pie sample exhibited the highest wound-induced phenolic, flavonoid, and carotenoid accumulation and DPPH radical scavenging activity among the cuts in both cultivars. Moreover, the shredded sample showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity but lower total phenolic and flavonoid content and the lowest antioxidant activity among the samples. Thus, the finding of this study revealed that pie-cut processing has potential in improving the quality and increasing the antioxidant activity of fresh-cut purple and yellow flesh sweet potato cultivars while shredding accelerated the quality deterioration of both sweet potato cultivars. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Preservation Technology for the Fresh Fruit and Vegetables)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Botrytis cinerea and Table Grapes: A Review of the Main Physical, Chemical, and Bio-Based Control Treatments in Post-Harvest
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1138; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091138 - 19 Aug 2020
Abstract
Consumers highly appreciate table grapes for their pleasant sensory attributes and as good sources of nutritional and functional compounds. This explains the rising market and global interest in this product. Along with other fruits and vegetables, table grapes are considerably perishable post-harvest due [...] Read more.
Consumers highly appreciate table grapes for their pleasant sensory attributes and as good sources of nutritional and functional compounds. This explains the rising market and global interest in this product. Along with other fruits and vegetables, table grapes are considerably perishable post-harvest due to the growth of undesired microorganisms. Among the microbial spoilers, Botrytis cinerea represents a model organism because of its degrading potential and the huge economic losses caused by its infection. The present review provides an overview of the recent primary physical, chemical, and biological control treatments adopted against the development of B. cinerea in table grapes to extend shelf life. These treatments preserve product quality and safety. This article also focuses on the compliance of different approaches with organic and sustainable production processes. Tailored approaches include those that rely on controlled atmosphere and the application of edible coating and packaging, as well as microbial-based activities. These strategies, applied alone or in combination, are among the most promising solutions in order to prolong table grape quality during cold storage. In general, the innovative design of applications dealing with hurdle technologies holds great promise for future improvements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovative Preservation Technology for the Fresh Fruit and Vegetables)
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