Special Issue "Anthocyanins in Foods"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Taylor C. Wallace, PhD, CFS, FACN
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nutrition and Food Studies, George Mason University
Think Healthy Group, Inc.
Tel. +1 270-839-1776
Prof. Dr. M. Monica Giusti, PhD
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Technology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA
Interests: functional foods, phytonutrients, natural colorants; chemistry and functionality of flavonoids, with emphasis on anthocyanins as food colorants and functional foods and other phenolic compounds, such as isoflavones and proanthocyanidins
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Anthocyanins are among the most interesting and vigorously studied plant compounds, representing a large class of polyphenolic pigments within the flavonoid family that exist ubiquitously in the human diet. Over 700 unique anthocyanins have been identified in nature, representing a large portion of cyanic colors (pink to red) in foods such as salmon and violet to dark blue colors present in most fruits, vegetables, and flowers, among other angiosperms.

Fruit and vegetable intake continues to be suboptimal across most populations with respect to the current dietary guidelines; therefore, anthocyanin intake is low. Anthocyanin consumption in the United States has been estimated to be 11 mg per day, with about one-third of the population having no intake. At the same time, a growing body of clinical evidence suggests that the intake of anthocyanins at levels equivalent to those present in the recommended daily amounts of fruits and vegetables (i.e., 30–35 mg/d) may decrease the risk of several age- and obesity-related chronic diseases. In particular, consumption of anthocyanins has recently been shown to decrease low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL–C) and thus aid in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

Anthocyanins are outstanding compounds that by their aglycone parts (i.e., anthocyanidins) are involved in a series of chemical reactions, which are particularly dependent on pH and give rise to secondary structures. These forms have different chemical and possibly nutraceutical properties. Anthocyanins are of particular interest to the food industry because of their ability to impart vibrant colors to a variety of food products, serving as value-added ingredients. Food scientists have successfully used anthocyanins as an alternative to artificial dyes and lakes in numerous applications. The use of these compounds in “functional food” products that are commonly consumed offers another strategy to help increase the population’s intake of these dietary bioactive compounds.

Your publication is welcomed to this Special Issue of Foods. The final deadline for manuscript submission is 30 April 2019. All articles will be peer-reviewed, and the articles received before the deadline will be immediately processed.

Sincerely,

Dr. Taylor C Wallace, PhD, CFS, FACN
Prof. Dr. M. Monica Giusti, PhD
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Anthocyanin
  • Food
  • Color additive
  • Food ingredient
  • Characterization
  • Quantification
  • Stability
  • Shelf life

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Stability and Quality of Anthocyanin in Purple Sweet Potato Extracts
Foods 2019, 8(9), 393; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8090393 - 06 Sep 2019
Abstract
Because of the high nutritional value of anthocyanin in purple sweet potatoes (TN57), the stability and quality of anthocyanin in purple sweet potatoes during and after the processing were investigated in this study. First of all, the extraction methods with different parameters, such [...] Read more.
Because of the high nutritional value of anthocyanin in purple sweet potatoes (TN57), the stability and quality of anthocyanin in purple sweet potatoes during and after the processing were investigated in this study. First of all, the extraction methods with different parameters, such as temperature, time, solid-liquid ratio, pH value, and solvent were employed to get better extraction efficiencies. After that, DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) and ABTS (2,2′-azino-bis (3-ethylbenz thiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) were used to evaluate the anti-oxidation ability of the extracts. Lastly, the thermal degradation kinetics and photodegradation were used to obtain important degradation factors including the content of anthocyanin residue, degradation index (DI), color parameters, reaction rate (k), and chromatic aberration (ΔE). We found that the extraction condition as using 60% ethanol with 1% citric acid under 80 °C for 40 min was optimal for purple sweet potatoes, which obtained antioxidant capacity as 333 μM TE DPPH, 376 μM TE ABTS+, and 593.6 μM TE ferric ion reducing antioxidant power (FRAP). The results indicate that the most important parameter for the stability of anthocyanin in the purple sweet potato extract (PSPAE) was the pH value rather than temperature. In addition, there was no significant difference in chromatic aberration between the light and dark storage conditions under 37 °C. Thus, PSPAE has the potential to be developed as health foods and drinks rich in anthocyanin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anthocyanins in Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Pure Polyphenols and Cranberry Juice High in Anthocyanins Increase Antioxidant Capacity in Animal Organs
Foods 2019, 8(8), 340; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8080340 - 12 Aug 2019
Abstract
Anthocyanins and the broader class of polyphenols are strong antioxidants in vitro. Polyphenols are one of the major antioxidants in plant foods, and the beverages derived from them. There is extensive evidence in the literature that polyphenols are beneficial to health. In order [...] Read more.
Anthocyanins and the broader class of polyphenols are strong antioxidants in vitro. Polyphenols are one of the major antioxidants in plant foods, and the beverages derived from them. There is extensive evidence in the literature that polyphenols are beneficial to health. In order to be bioactive in vivo, they need to be bioavailable and be transported from the circulation to target organs. To date, there have been few studies testing the extent to which polyphenols and especially anthocyanins affect the antioxidant capacity of animal organs. In our first pilot study, we investigated how three pure polyphenols (the flavonoids quercetin, catechin and hesperetin) given to rats by intraperitoneal injection (49 to 63 mg/kg) affected their organ antioxidant capacity. This was followed by a subsequent study that injected one ml of 100% cranberry juice (high in anthocyanins) to hamsters. Antioxidant capacity of animal organs was determined by using the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) colorimetric assay on methanolic extracts of select rat organs (i.e., liver, kidney, heart, prostate and brain) and in the hamster organs (i.e., liver, kidney, heart, bladder and brain). Overall the results showed that antioxidant capacity was significantly increased (p < 0.05) in experimental vs. control organs. Analysis of organs by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) from both animal studies provided evidence of polyphenol metabolites in the organ extracts. Taken together, this study provides data that the administration of anthocyanins and other polyphenols cause an increase in organ antioxidant capacity in two animal models. This result supports the growing evidence for the hypothesis that dietary polyphenols reduce the risk and extent of various chronic disease at the disease site. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anthocyanins in Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Agave Fructans as Carrier on the Encapsulation of Blue Corn Anthocyanins by Spray Drying
Foods 2019, 8(7), 268; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8070268 - 19 Jul 2019
Abstract
Effects of agave fructans as carrier agents on the encapsulation of blue corn anthocyanins using spray-drying were evaluated. Blue corn extract was mixed with 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% (w/v) of agave fructans in duplicate and dried at 150 [...] Read more.
Effects of agave fructans as carrier agents on the encapsulation of blue corn anthocyanins using spray-drying were evaluated. Blue corn extract was mixed with 6%, 8%, 10%, and 12% (w/v) of agave fructans in duplicate and dried at 150 °C. The extract showed good contents of anthocyanins, polyphenols, and antioxidant activity. The increase of agave fructans in the encapsulated powders caused a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the humidity, water activity (aw), pH, bulk density, water solubility index (WSI), and color L* values. On the contrary, the agave fructan addition decreased the hygroscopicity, water absorption index (WAI), antioxidant activity, total anthocyanin, total polyphenol, and individual anthocyanin contents. The encapsulation of blue corn extract with 6% agave fructans (w/v) resulted in good physical, thermal, morphological, and high antioxidant properties. The results suggest that the use of agave fructans as wall material represents advantages in the conservation of anthocyanins and other bioactive compounds from blue corn extract during their encapsulation. The application of blue corn anthocyanin encapsulated powders as a food ingredient is promising for food pigmentation, representing additional advantages for their contribution as a soluble fiber that can benefit the health of consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anthocyanins in Foods)
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Open AccessArticle
Stability of Anthocyanins, Phenolics and Color of Tart Cherry Jams
Foods 2019, 8(7), 255; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8070255 - 12 Jul 2019
Abstract
The aim of this work was to assess the effect of a set storage period on the phenolics, anthocyanins, antioxidant activity, color, and texture of three types of jams made from tart cherry. The prepared samples of tart cherry jams were: (1) regular [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was to assess the effect of a set storage period on the phenolics, anthocyanins, antioxidant activity, color, and texture of three types of jams made from tart cherry. The prepared samples of tart cherry jams were: (1) regular jam; (2) extra jam; and (3) light jam. The samples were stored at room temperature for eight months. Results of the investigated parameters after storage were compared with the results after sample preparations, and between the different jam samples. The light jam had the highest phenolic content and anthocyanin content (3.34 g/kg and 985.52 mg/kg). Consequently, the light jam had the highest antioxidant activity determined by ABTS (2,2’-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline sulfonic acid)) and DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazil) method. After storage, the highest retention of the phenolics had regular jam and extra jam (85%), while the lowest retention (74%) were found in the light jam. Anthocyanin stability was the highest in the regular jam, then the extra jam (15%), and then the light jam, with retention of 22%, 15%, and 12%, respectively. Color parameters and textural parameters also depended on jam type, as well as on storage conditions. Since the investigated types of jams differed in content of fruit and water, these are the most important factors that cause the change in the retention of phenolics and anthocyanins, as well as a change in color and textural parameters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anthocyanins in Foods)
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