Food Drying Applications for Plant Products: A Comparative Analysis

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Foods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 2166

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Agronomy, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia
Interests: food processing; fruit and vegetable dehydration; food chemistry; shelf life

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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Technology, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia
Interests: food chemistry; food quality; food processing and engineering; food and nutrition; food safety; food preservation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant products (fruits, vegetables, herbs, grains, legumes, etc.) are seasonal and perishable foods, being available in a fresh state for normally just a few months per year. Therefore, the produce requires either processing or storage at low temperatures.

Drying is one of the oldest methods through which to preserve plant products and prolong shelf life. The application of a high drying temperature is still the most dominant method, although it carries certain drawbacks: extensive changes in chemical composition and consequent changes in sensory properties, product shrinking, high energy consumption, etc. Such drying is normally followed by the loss of bioactive compounds, such as vitamins and polyphenols, and the formation of new, less valuable compounds.

Nowadays, consumers demand high-quality and additive-free products with an extended shelf life, which might be considered healthier, even functional food. Therefore, plant origin product processors are in constant pursuit of drying methods, which will be either optimized traditional techniques, completely novel, or synergistic methods consisting of several known methods. Pretreatments prior to processing might be of extreme benefit.

Therefore, we would like to invite authors to contribute original research and review articles focused on various drying methods and pretreatments of plant products (integrated and organic) in order to obtain high-quality foods during shortened low-energy drying processes. 

Dr. Nemanja Miletic
Dr. Milica Nićetin
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • plant products
  • drying
  • pretreatments
  • traditional and novel drying methods
  • drying optimization and modeling
  • chemical composition and antioxidativity of dried products
  • energy usage and consumption of drying methods
  • integrated and organic plant production

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 184 KiB  
Editorial
Food-Drying Applications for Plant Products: A Comparative Analysis
by Nemanja Miletić and Milica Nićetin
Foods 2023, 12(20), 3739; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12203739 - 11 Oct 2023
Viewed by 588
Abstract
Consumable plant products are seasonal and perishable items, generally only available in a fresh state for a few months each year [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Drying Applications for Plant Products: A Comparative Analysis)

Research

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16 pages, 1812 KiB  
Article
Impact of Air-Drying Temperatures on Drying Kinetics, Physicochemical Properties, and Bioactive Profile of Ginger
by Muhammad Nouman Shaukat, Biagio Fallico and Akmal Nazir
Foods 2024, 13(7), 1096; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13071096 - 03 Apr 2024
Viewed by 489
Abstract
Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is a perishable commodity that requires proper processing to maintain its bioactivity. This study evaluated the effect of different air-drying temperatures (50 °C, 60 °C, and 70 °C) on ginger’s drying kinetics and quality attributes. For an enhanced [...] Read more.
Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is a perishable commodity that requires proper processing to maintain its bioactivity. This study evaluated the effect of different air-drying temperatures (50 °C, 60 °C, and 70 °C) on ginger’s drying kinetics and quality attributes. For an enhanced understanding of the drying kinetics, we employed a detailed approach by combining an existing drying model (namely, Midilli) with the Arrhenius model. This combined model facilitates a thorough analysis of how temperature and time concurrently affect the moisture ratio, offering more profound insights into the drying mechanism. A higher drying rate was achieved at 70 °C, yet elevated drying temperatures could compromise the quality attributes of ginger slices. Ginger slices dried at 50 °C displayed improved physicochemical properties and less color browning. The evaluation of the bioactivity profile of resultant ginger extracts also revealed higher total phenolic contents (1875.87 ± 31.40 mg GAE/100 g) and DPPH radical scavenging activity (18.2 ± 0.9 mg TE/kg) in 50 °C treated ginger samples. Meanwhile, the hydroethanolic mixture (70% ethanol) was also reorganized with better extraction efficiency than water and MWF (a ternary blend of methanol, water, and formic acid) solution. The promising outcomes of this study endorse the influence of drying temperature on the quality characteristics and bioactive profile of ginger and the selection of suitable extraction solvents to acquire phenolic-rich extract. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Drying Applications for Plant Products: A Comparative Analysis)
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14 pages, 1743 KiB  
Article
Physical and Chemical Properties of Convective- and Microwave-Dried Blackberry Fruits Grown Using Organic Procedures
by Marko Petković, Nemanja Miletić, Valerija Pantelić, Vladimir Filipović, Biljana Lončar and Olga Mitrović
Foods 2024, 13(5), 791; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13050791 - 04 Mar 2024
Viewed by 594
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the effect of convective and microwave drying on the bioactive-compounds content of blackberry (Rubus fruticosus) fruits, as well as drying parameters and energy consumption. The fruit was dehydrated in a convective dehydrator at a temperature of [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the effect of convective and microwave drying on the bioactive-compounds content of blackberry (Rubus fruticosus) fruits, as well as drying parameters and energy consumption. The fruit was dehydrated in a convective dehydrator at a temperature of 50 °C and 70 °C and in a microwave oven at power levels of 90 W, 180 W and 240 W. The highest amount of anthocyanins, polyphenols and antioxidant capacity were obtained in blackberry fruits that were microwave dried at 90 W and 180 W (46.3–52.5 and 51.8–83.5 mg 100 g−1 dm of total anthocyanins, 296.3–255.8 and 418.4–502.2 mg 100 g−1 dm of total phenolics, and 1.20–1.51 and 1.45–2.35 mmol TE 100 g−1 dm of antioxidant capacity for 90 W and 180 W models, respectively). It turned out that microwave dehydration shortened the processing time and lowered the energy consumption compared to convective drying (a significantly reduced drying time of 92–99% with microwave dehydration). Blackberry fruits dehydrated at 240 W showed the shortest dehydration time (59–67 min), minimal energy consumption (0.23 kWh) and the most efficient diffusion (1.48–1.66 × 10−8 m2 s−1). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Drying Applications for Plant Products: A Comparative Analysis)
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