Natural Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Agents in Food Packaging and Preservation

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Packaging and Preservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 August 2024 | Viewed by 3019

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Post-Graduation Program of Food Technology, Federal University of Technology – Parana, Av. Pioneiros 3131, Londrina 86036-370, Brazil
Interests: edible coatings and films; biodegradable films; active packaging; microencapsulation

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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, State University of Ponta Grossa, Av. Carlos Cavalcanti 4748, Ponta Grossa 84030–900, Brazil
Interests: food technology; biodegradable polymers; bioactive compounds; by-products

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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, Federal University of Technology – Parana, Dois Vizinhos, Brazil
Interests: food science; active biodegradable packaging; starch-based materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, consumers' perceptions of synthetic preservatives have grown unfavorable. In response to this, research is being focused on the extraction, characterization, and application of natural additives with the aim of increasing the food shelf life. Plants, animals, and microorganisms are considered the natural active component reservoirs. In addition, food industry by-products are an attractive source of bioactive compounds, at low cost and high availability. Natural antimicrobial and antioxidant agents have shown high potential to inhibit the growth of foodborne microorganisms and minimize oxidative reactions; however, their effects in real-world applications have not been fully evaluated in food products. Considering active and smart packaging, many studies have demonstrated the application of the bioactive additives in the polymeric matrix, but few works have applied the developed package in food and evaluated its shelf life, thus requiring further studies to enable a commercial application. In this Special Issue, we invite researchers to submit original research or reviews articles on natural antimicrobial and antioxidant agents used in food packaging and preservation. Topics of interest include the development, characterization, and application of active or smart packaging in food systems or simulants.

Dr. Marianne A. Shirai
Dr. Juliana Bonametti Olivato
Dr. Juliano Zanela
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • bioactive compounds
  • active packaging
  • smart packaging
  • coating
  • food shelf-life
  • biopolymers
  • processing
  • food safety
  • food quality
  • by-products

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 280 KiB  
Article
Effects of Supplementing Selenium-Enriched Cardamine violifolia to Laying Hens on Egg Quality and Yolk Antioxidant Capacity during Storage at 4 °C and 25 °C
by Kun Qin, Xin Cong, Hui Wang, Mengke Yan, Xianfeng Xu, Mingkang Liu, Fulong Song, Dan Wang, Xiao Xu, Jiangchao Zhao, Shuiyuan Cheng, Yulan Liu and Huiling Zhu
Foods 2024, 13(5), 802; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13050802 - 5 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Oxidative stress occurs in the process of egg storage. Antioxidants as feed additives can enhance egg quality and extend the shelf life of eggs. Selenium-enriched Cardamine violifolia (SEC) has strongly antioxidant properties. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of [...] Read more.
Oxidative stress occurs in the process of egg storage. Antioxidants as feed additives can enhance egg quality and extend the shelf life of eggs. Selenium-enriched Cardamine violifolia (SEC) has strongly antioxidant properties. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of dietary supplementation with SEC on egg quality and the yolk antioxidant capacity of eggs stored at 4 °C and 25 °C. Four hundred fifty 65-week-old, Roman hens that were similar in laying rate (90.79 ± 1.69%) and body weight (2.19 ± 0.23 kg) were divided into 5 groups. The birds were fed diets supplemented with 0 mg/kg selenium (Se) (CON), 0.3 mg/kg Se from sodium selenite (SS), 0.3 mg/kg Se from Se-enriched yeast (SEY), 0.3 mg/kg Se for selenium-enriched Cardamine violifolia (SEC) or 0.3 mg/kg Se from Se-enriched Cardamine violifolia and 0.3 mg/kg Se from Se-enriched yeast (SEC + SEY) for 8 weeks. The eggs were collected on the 8th week and were analyzed for egg quality and oxidative stability of yolk during storage at 4 °C or 25 °C for 0, 2, 4, or 6 weeks. Dietary SEC and SEC + SEY supplementation increased the Haugh unit (HU) and albumen foam stability in eggs stored at 4 °C and 25 °C (p < 0.05). SS and SEC supplementation increased the yolk index in eggs stored at 25 °C (p < 0.05). SEC or SEC + SEY slowed down an increase in albumen pH and gel firmness in eggs stored at 4 °C and 25 °C (p < 0.05). Moreover, SEC or SEC + SEY alleviated the increase in malonaldehyde (MDA), and the decrease in total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) level and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activity in yolks stored at 4 °C and 25 °C (p < 0.05). These results indicate that SEC mitigated egg quality loss and improved the antioxidant capacity of yolks during storage. SEC supplementation would be advantageous to extend the shelf life of eggs. Full article
21 pages, 986 KiB  
Article
Analysis of Bioactive Aroma Compounds in Essential Oils from Algerian Plants: Implications for Potential Antioxidant Applications
by Anis Bertella, Georgiana-Luminita Gavril, Magdalena Wrona, Davinson Pezo, Abouamama Sidaoui, Kheira Benlahcen, Mebrouk Kihal, Ewa Olewnik-Kruszkowska, Jesús Salafranca and Cristina Nerín
Foods 2024, 13(5), 749; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13050749 - 28 Feb 2024
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Abstract
In samples of Artemisia campestris (AC), Artemisia herba-alba (AHA) and Salvia jordanii (SJ) essential oils, up to 200 distinct volatile compounds were identified. Using headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography–olfactometry–mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-O-MS), different panelists detected 52 of these compounds. This study offers [...] Read more.
In samples of Artemisia campestris (AC), Artemisia herba-alba (AHA) and Salvia jordanii (SJ) essential oils, up to 200 distinct volatile compounds were identified. Using headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography–olfactometry–mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-O-MS), different panelists detected 52 of these compounds. This study offers the most detailed analysis of bioactive compound profiles conducted so far. The most abundant compounds identified were curcumene, making up 12.96% of AC, and camphor, constituting 21.67% of AHA and 19.15% of SJ. The compounds with the highest odor activity value (OAV) were (E,Z)-2,4-nonadienal (geranium, pungent), 3-nonenal (cucumber) and 2-undecenal (sweet) in AC, AHA and SJ, respectively. AHA essential oil showed significant antioxidant activity (IC50 = 41.73 ± 4.14 mg/g) and hydroxyl radical generation (hydroxylation percentage = 29.62 ± 3.14), as assessed by the diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. In terms of oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), the strongest antioxidant activity was obtained for SJ essential oil (antioxidant activity of the essential oils, AOX = 337.49 ± 9.87). Full article
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