New Sources of Proteins for Aquaculture Feeds

A special issue of Fishes (ISSN 2410-3888).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2020) | Viewed by 18593

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Aquaculture Programme, Institute of Agrifood Research and Technology, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain
Interests: aquaculture; fish; fisheries; larvae; larviculture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This call for “new sources of proteins for aquaculture feeds” aims to identify new sources different from plant proteins, which, apart from being unsustainable, have a highly variable cost dependent on the source. Thus, in order to promote more sustainable value chains, local sustainable protein production becomes important, and other sources like fisheries’ discards, fish processing byproducts, poultry byproducts, meat and bone meal, distillers’ spent grains or spent yeast, single cell proteins, or other type of byproducts are considered interesting sources for aquaculture feeds.

This Special Issue aims to create a comprehensive and up-to-date collection of the current knowledge regarding the use of such protein sources in both fresh and marine aquaculture, with a special emphasis on the identification of those aspects already well established as well as those aspects still requiring further research.

I am pleased to solicit manuscripts pertaining to original research, short and full reviews, and short communications, as well as perspectives which address any aspect of the above-mentioned new protein sources used for aquaculture feeds.

Dr. Alicia Estevez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fishes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • brewery byproducts
  • new plant proteins
  • plankton byproducts
  • fish canning byproducts
  • single cell proteins
  • animal-derived byproducts
  • protein composition
  • aminoacids
  • digestibility
  • protein inclusion

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 290 KiB  
Article
Nutritional and Growth Effect of Insect Meal Inclusion on Seabass (Dicentrarchuss labrax) Feeds
by María Reyes, María Rodríguez, Juan Montes, Fernando G. Barroso, Dmitri Fabrikov, Elvira Morote and María José Sánchez-Muros
Fishes 2020, 5(2), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes5020016 - 1 Jun 2020
Cited by 28 | Viewed by 4308
Abstract
Abajo: se repite los tres en el resumen. This work studies the effect of high-level fish meal replacement with insect meal: YW meal (obtained from Tenebrio larvae fed a broiler diet), BSF meal (from hermetia larvae fed broilers diet), BSFm meal (obtained from [...] Read more.
Abajo: se repite los tres en el resumen. This work studies the effect of high-level fish meal replacement with insect meal: YW meal (obtained from Tenebrio larvae fed a broiler diet), BSF meal (from hermetia larvae fed broilers diet), BSFm meal (obtained from hermetia larvae fed discard fish) on growth performance nutritive indices and in vitro digestibility of Dicentrarchus labrax juvenile. Three different insect meals were used: BSF meal from hermetia larvae fed broilers diet; BSF improve (BSFm) obtained from hermetia larvae fed discarded fish; YW meal obtained from the larvae of Tenebrio fed a broiler diet. Five diets were used, a control (C) diet and four experimental diets by replacing fishmeal with insect meal from BSF at 30% and 50% (BSF30 and BSF50) substitutions, BSFm at 50% substitution (BSF50 m) and YM at 50% substitution (YW50). Nutritional and growth indices worsened by including insect meal, especially for hermetia meal at 50% substitution, BSF50 and BSF50 m. The internal organs’ weight reflected the growth of the fish fed each experimental diet. No differences were found in fillet composition. Nevertheless, under our experimental condition, YW replacement obtained better results than both BSF diets. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Sources of Proteins for Aquaculture Feeds)
14 pages, 1447 KiB  
Article
Study of Fishmeal Substitution on Growth Performance and Shelf-Life of Giltheadsea Bream (Sparusaurata)
by Patricia Zaragozá, Silvia Martínez-Llorens, Isabel Fernández-Segovia, José-Luis Vivancos, Ana Tomas-Vidal, Ana Fuentes, José Vicente Ros-Lis, Ramón Martínez-Máñez and José Manuel Barat
Fishes 2020, 5(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes5020015 - 15 May 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2811
Abstract
In this work the effect of partial or total replacement of fishmeal by plant protein sources and krill and squid meal on growth performance and shelf-life of gilthead sea bream was evaluated. Plant protein dietswith 50 g kg−1 of krill and 100 [...] Read more.
In this work the effect of partial or total replacement of fishmeal by plant protein sources and krill and squid meal on growth performance and shelf-life of gilthead sea bream was evaluated. Plant protein dietswith 50 g kg−1 of krill and 100 g kg−1 of squid were supplemented with synthetic amino acidsand at the end of the growing period weight showed no significant differences. The spoilage process of the fish was followed by physicochemical and microbiological measurements together with a colorimetric sensor array (CSA) specially designed for that purpose. The changes in the physicochemical parameters and microbial growth showed that shelf-life of samples were in all cases lower than ninedays. The CSA was not able to show significant differences between both diets, confirming the physicochemical and microbiological results. The fact that the type of feed had no effect on the freshness parameters studied demonstrates that total fishmeal replacement with plant protein blends in the proportions used in this work could be an excellent alternative for feed formulation in aquaculture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Sources of Proteins for Aquaculture Feeds)
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Review

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39 pages, 830 KiB  
Review
The Application of Single-Cell Ingredients in Aquaculture Feeds—A Review
by Brett D. Glencross, David Huyben and Johan W. Schrama
Fishes 2020, 5(3), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes5030022 - 16 Jul 2020
Cited by 96 | Viewed by 10934
Abstract
Single-cell ingredients (SCI) are a relatively broad class of materials that encompasses bacterial, fungal (yeast), microalgal-derived products or the combination of all three microbial groups into microbial bioflocs and aggregates. In this review we focus on those dried and processed single-cell organisms used [...] Read more.
Single-cell ingredients (SCI) are a relatively broad class of materials that encompasses bacterial, fungal (yeast), microalgal-derived products or the combination of all three microbial groups into microbial bioflocs and aggregates. In this review we focus on those dried and processed single-cell organisms used as potential ingredients for aqua-feeds where the microorganisms are considered non-viable and are used primarily to provide protein, lipids or specific nutritional components. Among the SCI, there is a generalised dichotomy in terms of their use as either single-cell protein (SCP) resources or single-cell oil (SCO) resources, with SCO products being those oleaginous products containing 200 g/kg or more of lipids, whereas those products considered as SCP resources tend to contain more than 300 g/kg of protein (on a dry basis). Both SCP and SCO are now widely being used as protein/amino acid sources, omega-3 sources and sources of bioactive molecules in the diets of several species, with the current range of both these ingredient groups being considerable and growing. However, the different array of products becoming available in the market, how they are produced and processed has also resulted in different nutritional qualities in those products. In assessing this variation among the products and the application of the various types of SCI, we have taken the approach of evaluating their use against a set of standardised evaluation criteria based around key nutritional response parameters and how these criteria have been applied against salmonids, shrimp, tilapia and marine fish species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Sources of Proteins for Aquaculture Feeds)
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