Physiological Response Mechanism of Aquatic Animals to Stress

A special issue of Fishes (ISSN 2410-3888). This special issue belongs to the section "Physiology and Biochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 August 2024 | Viewed by 1147

Special Issue Editors

South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Guangzhou 510300, China
Interests: environmental stress; aquatic toxicology; pollutants; intestine microbiota; nutritional immunity; multiomics
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Guest Editor
School of Marine and Biological Engineering, Yancheng Institute of Technology, Yancheng 224051, China
Interests: seawater acidification; temperature; hypoxia; microplastics; mussel; shellfish

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Guest Editor
South China Sea Fisheries Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Fishery Sciences, Guangzhou 510300, China
Interests: environmental stress; immune regulation; apoptosis; shellfish

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Guest Editor
College of Marine Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023, China
Interests: molecular biology; fish breeding; genetics; genome; aquatic economic animals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the process of aquaculture, with the improvement of intensive farming, the stress of cultured animals occurs frequently. When the stress exceeds an animal's physiological tolerance, it adversely affects the survival, growth, and health of aquatic animals, ultimately leading to disease occurrence and a decline in breeding benefits. There are many factors that induce stress in aquatic animals, including environmental factors (such as water quality parameters), biological factors (including competition and pathogenic infections), and human-related factors (such as improper management, fishing practices, and transportation). Additionally, alterations in natural water or marine ecological environments, such as the presence of environmental pollutants, can also trigger stress responses in aquatic animals, resulting in detrimental effects. Addressing the urgent need to understand the physiological response mechanisms of aquatic animals to stress and devising strategies to eliminate or alleviate this stress are imperative. This Special Issue warmly welcomes original articles and review articles covering the physiological response mechanism of aquatic animals to stress, including physiology, biochemistry, immunity, metabolism, and molecular regulation.

Dr. Yafei Duan
Dr. Yanming Sui
Dr. Changhong Cheng
Dr. Kai Zhang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • environmental stress
  • pollutants
  • pathogen infection
  • physiology
  • biochemistry
  • immunology
  • metabolism
  • intestinal microbes
  • omics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 7508 KiB  
Article
Calmodulin Gene of Blunt Snout Bream (Megalobrama amblycephala): Molecular Characterization and Differential Expression after Aeromonas hydrophila and Cadmium Challenges
by Jinwei Gao, Hao Wu, Xing Tian, Jiayu Wu, Min Xie, Zhenzhen Xiong, Dongsheng Ou, Zhonggui Xie and Rui Song
Fishes 2024, 9(5), 182; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes9050182 - 16 May 2024
Viewed by 425
Abstract
Calmodulin (Calm), a crucial Ca2+ sensor, plays an important role in calcium-dependent signal transduction cascades. However, the expression and the relevance of Calm in stress and immune response have not been characterized in Megalobrama amblycephala. In this study, we identified the [...] Read more.
Calmodulin (Calm), a crucial Ca2+ sensor, plays an important role in calcium-dependent signal transduction cascades. However, the expression and the relevance of Calm in stress and immune response have not been characterized in Megalobrama amblycephala. In this study, we identified the full-length cDNA of Calm (termed MaCalm) in blunt snout bream M. amblycephala, and analyzed MaCalm expression patterns in response to cadmium and Aeromonas hydrophila challenges. MaCalm was 1603 bp long, including a 5′-terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 97 bp, a 3′-terminal UTR of 1056 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 450 bp encoding a polypeptide of 149 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight (MW) of 16.84 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 4.09. Usually, MaCalm contains four conservative EF hand motifs. The phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that the nucleotide sequence of MaCalm specifically clustered with Ctenopharyngodon idella with high identity (98.33%). Tissue distribution analysis demonstrated that the ubiquitous expression of MaCalm mRNA was found in all tested tissues, with the highest expression in the brain and the lowest expression in muscle. MaCalm showed significant upregulation at 14 d and 28 d post exposure to varying concentrations of cadmium in the liver; HSP70 transcripts in the liver significantly upregulated at 14 d post exposure to different concentrations of cadmium. Moreover, in response to the A. hydrophila challenge in vivo, MaCalm transcripts in the liver first increased and then decreased, but MaCalm transcripts in the kidney declined gradually with prolonged infection. After the A. hydrophila challenge, the expression level of HSP70 was significantly downregulated at 24 h in the liver and its expression level was notably downregulated at 12 h and at 24 h in the kidney. Collectively, our results suggest that MaCalm possesses vital roles in stress and immune response in M. amblycephala. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physiological Response Mechanism of Aquatic Animals to Stress)
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14 pages, 4036 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Effects of Dietary Tea Polyphenols on the Gut Microbiota of Loaches (Paramisgurnus dabryanus) under Chronic Ammonia Nitrogen Stress
by Yuqiao Chai, Shuhao Sun and Yingdong Li
Fishes 2024, 9(5), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes9050180 - 15 May 2024
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Abstract
This study examined the impact of tea polyphenols (TPs) on the intestinal flora of loaches (Paramisgurnus dabryanus) under chronic ammonia nitrogen stress using high-throughput sequencing. Two groups of 600 loaches were studied over one month, and they were separated into a [...] Read more.
This study examined the impact of tea polyphenols (TPs) on the intestinal flora of loaches (Paramisgurnus dabryanus) under chronic ammonia nitrogen stress using high-throughput sequencing. Two groups of 600 loaches were studied over one month, and they were separated into a control group and tea polyphenol group. Alpha and beta diversity analyses showed diverse bacterial communities, with significant differences in the abundance and uniformity observed initially but not between sampling time points. Cluster analyses revealed distinct differences in microbial communities between groups. A predictive function analysis indicated enrichment in pathways related to amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. These findings offer initial insights into how tea polyphenols may affect intestinal microbial communities in loaches under ammonia nitrogen stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physiological Response Mechanism of Aquatic Animals to Stress)
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