Diagnosis and Management of Small-Scale and Data-Limited Fisheries

A special issue of Fishes (ISSN 2410-3888). This special issue belongs to the section "Fishery Economics, Policy, and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 11545

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Marine Science and Applied Biology, Universitat d'Alacant, Alicante, Spain
Interests: fisheries management; small-scale fisheries; fisheries selectivity; fisheries governance; fisheries economics; fisheries certifications

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Guest Editor
MARE – Marine and Environmental Sciences Centre, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: small-scale fisheries; discards; multi-species fisheries; fisheries management; climate change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Historically, small-scale fisheries (SSF) were overlooked by fishery scientists and managers in comparison to large-scale and industrial fisheries. Despite the fact that SSF account for more than half of global landings (according to some estimates), as well as its importance in job creation, its contributions to food security and to the economies of some of the world’s poorest countries, the assessment, management and monitoring of these fisheries are usually inadequate or absent. This lack of attention has meant fewer resources assigned for data-collection and assessment of their stocks, especially for those stocks with relatively low commercial value. For this reason, most of the world’s fish stocks are considered data-limited. This also compromises the decision-making process and the implementation of adequate management measures and regulation when managers have to make decisions in the absence of data and/or adequate scientific advice.

Recently, scientific attention to SSF and data-limited fisheries is increasing as evidenced by a remarkable increase in peer-reviewed papers on this regard in the last decade. This Special Issue aims to provide new insights and empirical knowledge and to collect original and high-quality manuscripts related to all aspects of small-scale and data-limited fisheries, such as: activity of SSF; assessment of effectiveness of management strategies; IUU fishing; management measures, regulations, policies, and strategies; monitoring programmes; stock assessments; sustainable development of fisheries; sustainable exploitation of resources.

Dr. Mohamed Samy-Kamal
Dr. Célia M. Teixeira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fishes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • data-limited fisheries
  • fishery management
  • management measures
  • monitoring programs
  • small-scale fisheries
  • stock assessment
  • sustainability

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Editorial

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4 pages, 213 KiB  
Editorial
Diagnosis and Management of Small-Scale and Data-Limited Fisheries
by Mohamed Samy-Kamal and Célia M. Teixeira
Fishes 2023, 8(1), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes8010039 - 05 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1344
Abstract
Historically, small-scale fisheries (SSFs) have largely been overlooked by fisheries scientists and management authorities at national and international levels [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnosis and Management of Small-Scale and Data-Limited Fisheries)

Research

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26 pages, 5166 KiB  
Article
Application of the Method Evaluation and Risk Assessment Tool for a Small-Scale Grouper Fishery in Indonesia
by Yudi Herdiana, Budy Wiryawan, Sugeng H. Wisudo, James R. Tweedley, Irfan Yulianto, Mohamad Natsir, Siska Agustina, Adrian Hordyk and Neil R. Loneragan
Fishes 2023, 8(10), 498; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes8100498 - 05 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1674
Abstract
Management strategy evaluation using the Method Evaluation and Risk Assessment (MERA) platform was used to evaluate management procedures (MPs) for improving the management of the leopard coral grouper (Plectropomus leopardus) fishery in Saleh Bay, Indonesia. This grouper is a valuable species [...] Read more.
Management strategy evaluation using the Method Evaluation and Risk Assessment (MERA) platform was used to evaluate management procedures (MPs) for improving the management of the leopard coral grouper (Plectropomus leopardus) fishery in Saleh Bay, Indonesia. This grouper is a valuable species currently under high fishing pressure. It is targeted by small-scale fisheries using a wide range of fishing methods; hence, management recommendations are needed to ensure sustainability. A suite of MPs for data-limited conditions were evaluated for their ability to achieve limit and target biomass reference points (B/BMSY = 0.5 and B/BMSY = 1, respectively), while maintaining a target yield of at least 0.5 MSY. The simulation results suggest that the currently implemented harvest control rules (HCRs) in Saleh Bay (size limit and spatial closure) may not be effective in achieving the management objective to attain the target biomass reference point due to relatively low compliance with the size limit regulation (320 mm total length) and the very small proportion of existing MPA no-take areas (~2.2%). This study recommends that the fisheries management authority explores the feasibility of implementing the total allowable catch (TAC) and seasonal closure in addition to the existing fishing regulations for P. leopardus in Saleh Bay. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnosis and Management of Small-Scale and Data-Limited Fisheries)
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18 pages, 3108 KiB  
Article
Catch per Unit Effort of Decapod Species, C. pagurus and H. gammarus, from a Voluntary Marine Reserve
by Blair Alexander Andrew Easton, Kevin Scott, Joe Richards and Adam Rees
Fishes 2023, 8(8), 390; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes8080390 - 27 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1599
Abstract
C. pagurus and H. gammarus are deemed to be declining in abundance in the Berwickshire Marine Reserve from personal communications with local inshore fishers. Fisheries data in the form of catch per unit effort (CPUE) were collected for these two commercially important decapods. [...] Read more.
C. pagurus and H. gammarus are deemed to be declining in abundance in the Berwickshire Marine Reserve from personal communications with local inshore fishers. Fisheries data in the form of catch per unit effort (CPUE) were collected for these two commercially important decapods. Other explanatory variables from fishing activity such as the creel and bait type used, the soak time of the fishing gear, and deployment depth were recorded to provide as much detail as possible to describe the effort applied to catch these decapod species. In this study, CPUE was higher for H. gammarus and C. pagurus outside the Berwickshire Marine Reserve. General additive models (GAMs) were used to describe the effects of the explanatory variables and showed that soak time (days) and depth (m) significantly affected CPUE for C. pagurus, not H. gammarus. Sea temperature (°C) showed a negative correlation with the CPUE of both H. gammarus and C. pagurus; however, a positive correlation was found with the number of C. pagurus caught. The data collected in this study provide a foundation in understanding the current abundance of C. pagurus and H. gammarus in a voluntary marine reserve on the east coast of Scotland, which can be used to inform future changes in fisheries management in Berwickshire. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnosis and Management of Small-Scale and Data-Limited Fisheries)
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18 pages, 7539 KiB  
Article
Comparing the Size at Onset of Sexual Maturity of Edible Crab (Cancer pagurus, Cancridae) in Berwickshire and Northumberland
by Blair Alexander Andrew Easton, Andrew Boon, Joe Richards and Kevin Scott
Fishes 2023, 8(5), 260; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes8050260 - 13 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1611
Abstract
The literature suggests regional variations in the size at which sexual maturity is reached for commercially important edible crab (Cancer pagurus), worth GBP 74.3 million annually, which could have implications for regional fisheries management. Berwickshire and Northumberland are geographically divided by [...] Read more.
The literature suggests regional variations in the size at which sexual maturity is reached for commercially important edible crab (Cancer pagurus), worth GBP 74.3 million annually, which could have implications for regional fisheries management. Berwickshire and Northumberland are geographically divided by the Scotland and England border and remain within the Berwickshire and North Northumberland Coast SAC (Special Area of Conservation). Each are managed by differing fisheries authorities and Minimum Conservation Reference Sizes (MCRS). Morphometric measurements were recorded for each C. pagurus individual to categorise morphometric maturity using segmented regression, with gonadal maturity categorised using visual gonad characteristics and general linear model regressions to compare onset in sexual maturity. Results showed regional variations for gonadal maturity with males reaching sexual onset at a carapace width size of 108.5 mm in Berwickshire and 109.9 mm in Northumberland; females at a size of 126.8 mm in Berwickshire and 120.8 mm in Northumberland. This was also true for morphometric maturity based on chelae height, that males (141.1 mm) and females (134.7 mm) from Berwickshire were morphometrically mature at greater sizes than males (130.1 mm) and females (120.8 mm) from Northumberland. This study shows that the respective MCRS in both regions are appropriate for the C. pagurus populations, but implications for fisheries management could be present. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnosis and Management of Small-Scale and Data-Limited Fisheries)
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15 pages, 3620 KiB  
Article
Socio-Ecological Overview of the Greater Amberjack Fishery in the Balearic Islands
by Inês R. Pereira, Maria Valls, Sofya Aoufi, Oona C. Bienentreu, Yansong Huang and Miguel Cabanellas-Reboredo
Fishes 2023, 8(4), 184; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes8040184 - 30 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1761
Abstract
This study provides the first socio-ecological overview of the Seriola dumerili fishery occurring in the Balearic Islands. This pelagic top-predator is among the five most valued fish resources of the Balearic community. Despite its ecological importance and potential vulnerability to aggregation fishing, few [...] Read more.
This study provides the first socio-ecological overview of the Seriola dumerili fishery occurring in the Balearic Islands. This pelagic top-predator is among the five most valued fish resources of the Balearic community. Despite its ecological importance and potential vulnerability to aggregation fishing, few studies address the ecology of this large Carangidae species. Shining a light on its ecology is vital to ensure adequate species conservation and the sustainable and effective management of the fishery. Historical catches from 1950–1999, alongside detailed landing data for the last 21 years, were analysed to identify potential patterns in ecological and socio-economic factors. Significant inter-annual variability among the years was found in historical catches of greater amberjack, while catches and mean prices of the different size categories revealed significant results between seasons and months, respectively. Additionally, the purse seine fleet accounted for the highest percentage of S. dumerili catches. CPUE did not appear to change greatly between months and years after the annual 8-month fishing ban imposed in 2011 and therefore a re-evaluation of the closure was intended. Overall, this study suggests seasonality influences the S. dumerili fishery in the Balearic Islands, within which ecological influences show a higher regulating power than socio-economic factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnosis and Management of Small-Scale and Data-Limited Fisheries)
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13 pages, 2257 KiB  
Article
Effects of Fishing Selectivity and Dynamics on the Performance of Catch-Based Data-Limited Assessment Models for Species with Different Life History Traits
by Ting-Chun Kuo, Ching-Chun Cheng and Nan-Jay Su
Fishes 2023, 8(3), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes8030130 - 24 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1313
Abstract
The assessment of fish stocks is often limited by a lack of comprehensive data. Therefore, catch-based methods are increasingly being used because of the availability of more catch data. However, catch-based models may perform differently for species with different traits and fishing histories. [...] Read more.
The assessment of fish stocks is often limited by a lack of comprehensive data. Therefore, catch-based methods are increasingly being used because of the availability of more catch data. However, catch-based models may perform differently for species with different traits and fishing histories. In this study, we investigated the performance of catch-based models for species with different life history traits, fishing histories, and under different length selections. We compared simulated biomass with estimated stock status from three widely used catch-based models (Catch-MSY model [CMSY]; catch-only model-sampling importance resampling model [COM-SIR]; state-space catch-only model [SSCOM]) under three fishing history scenarios (constant, increasing then decreasing, and continuously increasing fishing mortality) and three length selectivity scenarios (no selectivity, preferring smaller individuals, preferring larger individuals). Our results showed that CMSY performed the best, particularly when fishing mortality remained constant. Catch-based models performed better for opportunistic species that had larger individuals selected for fishing and equilibrium species that had smaller individuals selected. However, the models tended to overestimate stock status when fishing mortality continued to increase. Therefore, caution should be exercised when applying catch-based methods to data-poor stocks with diverse life history traits, fishing history, and those sensitive to selective fishing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnosis and Management of Small-Scale and Data-Limited Fisheries)
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Review

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14 pages, 615 KiB  
Review
Marine Endangered and Threatened Species in Russia: A Review of Current Conservation Strategies and Management Legislative Tools
by Mohamed Samy-Kamal, Tatiana Shulezhko and Natalia Lisitcyna
Fishes 2023, 8(8), 399; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes8080399 - 02 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1486
Abstract
Despite the global decline in marine species biodiversity, relatively few countries have enacted national endangered and threatened species legislation. Tailoring an adequate legislative framework with clear objectives and regulations consistent with the available scientific evidence is fundamental for the effective conservation of marine [...] Read more.
Despite the global decline in marine species biodiversity, relatively few countries have enacted national endangered and threatened species legislation. Tailoring an adequate legislative framework with clear objectives and regulations consistent with the available scientific evidence is fundamental for the effective conservation of marine endangered and threatened species. This paper analyzes the legal framework and current institutional tools for the conservation of marine endangered and threatened species in the Russian Federation. In this regard, important legislative tools include federal laws, as well as internationally binding signed agreements, among others, such as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and the Convention on Wetlands of International Importance Especially as Waterfowl Habitat (Ramsar). A strategy and an action plan for the conservation of biological diversity were also developed. Besides, the most important tool for the conservation and protection of marine endangered and threatened species is the Red Book of the Russian Federation (RBRF) and other regional Red Books. Responsibility for causing harm to the species listed in the RBRF and their habitat is specified in the code of administrative offenses and the criminal code of the Russian Federation. Finally, conclusions and identified gaps were highlighted in the last section, including, among other things, that legislation is still limited in how it takes the impacts of climate change into account. Such type of study is highly recommended, considering the relatively few number of papers dedicated to the study of the impact and/or implications of the conservation tools and strategies mentioned in this paper on the status of the marine endangered and threatened species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diagnosis and Management of Small-Scale and Data-Limited Fisheries)
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