Special Issue "Advances in Beverages, Food, Yeast and Brewing Research"

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation for Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ogueri Nwaiwu
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Guest Editor
Alpha-Altis (Venture Member), Ingenuity Lab, The University of Nottingham, Jubilee Campus, Nottingham NG7 2TU, UK
Interests: microbiology and food safety; yeasts; Listeria; traditional food and drinks; extracellular polymeric substances; biofilms
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Mohamed Gedi
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Guest Editor
School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus Nr Loughborough, LE12 5RD, UK
Interests: food waste; food function; nutrition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The fermentation of food and beverages is as old as humanity and the products are consumed in huge quantities around the world. It is an old technique of preserving foods and the fermented food or beverage brings new sensory properties. The health benefits of fermented foods have been exploited commercially and the benefits are well accepted. The development of new analytical techniques in the last two decades have opened new ways of capturing the fermentation process. Despite the availability of modern equipment and methods of analysis, there is a gap in the understanding of several fermentation processes. This special issue will cover a broad range of topics that cover investigations carried out on any fermented food or beverage. Research articles, reviews and short communications for work carried out in chemistry, microbiology, food engineering, new products, nutrition, and sensory properties around the world are welcome. Any focus on the fermenter in chief, yeasts, is desirable and the work could be carried out on Saccharomyces or non-Saccharomyces yeast fermentation. Of course, research of wine production and brewing that is driven by different fermentation systems is acceptable. Submissions that bring new insights into the fermentation of often neglected fermented traditional food and drinks around the world will also be considered.

Dr. Ogueri Nwaiwu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Change in reactants and products
  • Chemistry
  • Sensory properties
  • Microbiology
  • Transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics
  • Food safety and nutrition
  • Food processing technology
  • New product development
  • Food structure and functionality
  • Volatiles and flavours
  • Physical changes

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Development of an Araucaria araucana Beer-like Beverage: Process and Product
Fermentation 2021, 7(3), 170; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7030170 - 28 Aug 2021
Viewed by 284
Abstract
The seed from the Araucaria araucana (in Spanish, piñon) tree, native to Chile and Argentina, is sold mainly as raw seed. Engineering a process to add value to piñon has the potential to positively impact local indigenous communities with very little ecological impact [...] Read more.
The seed from the Araucaria araucana (in Spanish, piñon) tree, native to Chile and Argentina, is sold mainly as raw seed. Engineering a process to add value to piñon has the potential to positively impact local indigenous communities with very little ecological impact because it is routinely harvested in the wild. This study evaluated the feasibility of using 100% piñon, or as a blend with barley malt, to produce a beer-like beverage, while also evaluating consumer acceptance of the beverage’s piñon characteristics. Prototypes generated based on 93% piñon and 7% oat (enzymatic treatment of α-amylase, glucoamylase, protease and β-glucanase), as well as 50% piñon and 50% barley (no external enzymatic treatment), were evaluated. Overall acceptability by a consumer acceptance panel (21 consumers) rated the 100% piñon and the piñon–barley malt blend 5/9 and 7/9, respectively. The piñon–barley malt blend prototype stood out for its low level of carbohydrates, high potassium content and banana and clove aromas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Beverages, Food, Yeast and Brewing Research)
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Article
Improving the Utilization of Isomaltose and Panose by Lager Yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus
Fermentation 2021, 7(3), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7030107 - 07 Jul 2021
Viewed by 716
Abstract
Approximately 25% of all carbohydrates in industrial worts are poorly, if at all, fermented by brewing yeast. This includes dextrins, β-glucans, arabinose, xylose, disaccharides such as isomaltose, nigerose, kojibiose, and trisaccharides such as panose and isopanose. As the efficient utilization of carbohydrates during [...] Read more.
Approximately 25% of all carbohydrates in industrial worts are poorly, if at all, fermented by brewing yeast. This includes dextrins, β-glucans, arabinose, xylose, disaccharides such as isomaltose, nigerose, kojibiose, and trisaccharides such as panose and isopanose. As the efficient utilization of carbohydrates during the wort’s fermentation impacts the alcohol yield and the organoleptic traits of the product, developing brewing strains with enhanced abilities to ferment subsets of these sugars is highly desirable. In this study, we developed Saccharomyces pastorianus laboratory yeast strains with a superior capacity to grow on isomaltose and panose. First, we designed a plasmid toolbox for the stable integration of genes into lager strains. Next, we used the toolbox to elevate the levels of the α-glucoside transporter Agt1 and the major isomaltase Ima1. This was achieved by integrating synthetic AGT1 and IMA1 genes under the control of strong constitutive promoters into defined genomic sites. As a result, strains carrying both genes showed a superior capacity to grow on panose and isomaltose, indicating that Ima1 and Agt1 act in synergy to consume these sugars. Our study suggests that non-GMO strategies aiming to develop strains with improved isomaltose and panose utilization could include identifying strains that overexpress AGT1 and IMA1. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Beverages, Food, Yeast and Brewing Research)
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Article
Assessment of the Suitability of Aromatic and High-Bitter Hop Varieties (Humulus lupulus L.) for Beer Production in the Conditions of the Małopolska Vistula Gorge Region
Fermentation 2021, 7(3), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7030104 - 30 Jun 2021
Viewed by 366
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the yield of cones and the quality of six hop varieties (“Iunga”, “Lubelski”, “Sybilla”, “Magnum”, “Lomik”, “Marynka”) in terms of their suitability for beer production, under the conditions of the Małopolska Vistula Gorge Region (21°53′ [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to assess the yield of cones and the quality of six hop varieties (“Iunga”, “Lubelski”, “Sybilla”, “Magnum”, “Lomik”, “Marynka”) in terms of their suitability for beer production, under the conditions of the Małopolska Vistula Gorge Region (21°53′ E; 51°16′ N) (2015–2017). The scope of the research included the determination of the yield of cones and their physicochemical properties, as well as determination of the contents of hop resins and essential oils. In bitter varieties, the ratio of alpha-acids to beta-acids was stable, while, in aromatic varieties, it was variable. In the essential oils of the studied hop varieties, compounds with myrcene and α-humulene were identified and dominated the profiles. “Iunga”, “Sybilla”, “Lubelski”, and “Lomik” were rich in monoterpene hydrocarbons, mainly myrcene, while there was a bit more α-humulene in the “Marynka” variety. “Magnum” was characterized by an even distribution of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. The “Magnum variety turned out the most useful for the brewing industry in this region. The Małopolska Vistula Gorge Region is a region where hops not only achieve a high yield of cones, but also good-quality. The bitterness and aroma content of the hops in this region is high. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Beverages, Food, Yeast and Brewing Research)
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Article
Control of N-Propanol Production in Simulated Liquid State Fermentation of Chinese Baijiu by Response Surface Methodology
Fermentation 2021, 7(2), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7020085 - 31 May 2021
Viewed by 623
Abstract
N-propanol is a vital flavor compound of Chinese baijiu, and the proper n-propanol contents contribute to the rich flavor of Chinese baijiu. However, the excessive content of n-propanol in liquor will reduce the drinking comfort. Based on the Box–Behnken design principle, the response [...] Read more.
N-propanol is a vital flavor compound of Chinese baijiu, and the proper n-propanol contents contribute to the rich flavor of Chinese baijiu. However, the excessive content of n-propanol in liquor will reduce the drinking comfort. Based on the Box–Behnken design principle, the response surface test was used to optimize the factors affecting the production of n-propanol in a simulated liquid state fermentation of Chinese baijiu, and the best combination of factors to reduce n-propanol content was determined. Results showed that the content ratio of additional glucose to threonine and temperature had a significant effect on the production of n-propanol (p = 0.0009 < 0.01 and p = 0.0389 < 0.05, respectively). The best combination of fermentation parameters obtained was: the ratio of additional glucose to threonine content was 6:4, the temperature was 32 °C, and the initial pH was 4.40. Under these conditions, the production of n-propanol was 53.84 ± 0.12 mg/L, which was close to the theoretical value. Thus, the fermentation parameter model obtained through response surface optimization is reliable and can provide technical guidance for regulating the production of n-propanol and realizing high-quality baijiu brewing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Beverages, Food, Yeast and Brewing Research)
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Article
Utilizing Coffee Pulp and Mucilage for Producing Alcohol-Based Beverage
Fermentation 2021, 7(2), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7020053 - 05 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1025
Abstract
Coffee pulp, mucilage, and beans with mucilage were used to develop alcoholic beverages. The pulp of 45.3% pulp, 54.7% mucilage with seed, and 9.4% mucilage only were obtained during the wet processing of coffee. Musts were prepared for all to TSS (Total soluble [...] Read more.
Coffee pulp, mucilage, and beans with mucilage were used to develop alcoholic beverages. The pulp of 45.3% pulp, 54.7% mucilage with seed, and 9.4% mucilage only were obtained during the wet processing of coffee. Musts were prepared for all to TSS (Total soluble solid) 18 °Bx and fermentation was carried out for 12–16 days until TSS decreased to 5 °Bx at 30 °C. Phenolic characteristics, chromatic structures, chemical parameters, and sensory characteristics were analyzed for the prepared alcoholic beverages. Methanol content, ester content, aldehyde, alcohol, total acidity, caffeine, polyphenols, flavonoids, chromatic structure, and hue of the alcoholic beverage from the pulp was 335 mg/L, 70.58 ppm, 9.15 ppm, 8.86 ABV%, 0.41%, 30.94 ppm, 845.7 mg GAE/g dry extract, 440.7 mg QE/g dry extract, 0.41, and 1.71, respectively. An alcoholic beverage from the pulp was found superior to an alcoholic beverage from mucilage with beans and a beverage from mucilage in sensory analysis. There is the possibility of developing fermented alcoholic beverages from coffee pulp and mucilage. However, further research is necessary for quality of the beans that were obtained from the fermentation with the mucilage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Beverages, Food, Yeast and Brewing Research)
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