Functional Characterization of Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Fermented Foods and Beverages

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Metabolism, Physiology & Genetics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2023) | Viewed by 7151

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
School of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University College Cork, T12 YN60 Cork, Ireland
Interests: fermentation; food chemistry; food science and technology; food technology; food analysis; enzymes; bioprocess engineering and fermentation technology; food microbiology; food processing and engineering; sensory evaluation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lactic acid bacteria (LABs) are naturally present in the environment. The natural fermentation of foods and beverages leads to substrate-specific microbial consortia—a variety of genera with different metabolic activities. The isolation and characterisation of these LABs enables the tailored development of functional foods and innovative products. Moreover, it provides research and industry communities with valuable information about the functionality and suitability of different LABs in specific substrates. Lactic acid bacteria produce metabolites which can be used to target specific modulations of foods and beverages, for example, the production of antifungal compounds will enhance shelf-life extension, specific organic acids help to modulate flavour and enhance gelling, the synthesis of polyols can be used to reduce added sugar, exopolysaccharides enhance texture, and active enzymes impact the digestibility of macromolecules and the bioavailability of micronutrients.

This Special Issue comprises original research articles and reviews addressing functional lactic acid bacteria from foods and beverages, as well as their isolation, characterisation, and application.

Dr. Aylin W. Sahin
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • lactic acid bacteria
  • functionalization by fermentation
  • fermentation of foods and beverages
  • strain isolation
  • targeted strain selection
  • metabolism
  • functional foods

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 2393 KiB  
Article
Microbial Ecology of Pecorino Siciliano PDO Cheese Production Systems
by Silvia Ruta, Matthew Murray, Zoe Kampff, Brian McDonnell, Gabriele Andrea Lugli, Marco Ventura, Massimo Todaro, Luca Settanni, Douwe van Sinderen and Jennifer Mahony
Fermentation 2023, 9(7), 620; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9070620 - 29 Jun 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1583
Abstract
Pecorino Siciliano PDO is a semi-hard cheese that is produced in wooden vats using raw sheep’s milk and its associated autochthonous microbial community. In the present study, we evaluated the microbial ecology of the milk, curd and whey from five Pecorino Siciliano PDO-producing [...] Read more.
Pecorino Siciliano PDO is a semi-hard cheese that is produced in wooden vats using raw sheep’s milk and its associated autochthonous microbial community. In the present study, we evaluated the microbial ecology of the milk, curd and whey from five Pecorino Siciliano PDO-producing farms in Sicily using a combination of metagenomic and microbiological approaches. We present an overview of the species and strain-level diversity of dairy lactococcal and streptococcal isolates using established genotyping tools and compare the lactic acid bacterial populations present in samples from these farms. Whole genome sequences of representative isolates of Lactococcus spp. and Streptococcus thermophilus were elucidated and the genetic diversity of the strains was established through analysis of predicted phage-resistance systems and prophage-associated regions. The analysis revealed farm-specific dairy lactococcal and streptococcal isolates that possess diverse genotypic features including newly described phage-resistance systems. Full article
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17 pages, 3894 KiB  
Article
Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Hydroxytyrosol from Lactiplantibacillus plantarum Fermented Olive Leaves: Process Optimization and Bioactivity Assessment
by Ceren Ilgaz, Haşim Kelebek and Pınar Kadiroglu
Fermentation 2023, 9(6), 514; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9060514 - 26 May 2023
Viewed by 1025
Abstract
Olive leaves are important by-products for the recovery of phenolic compounds and extracts with high phenolic content using lactic acid bacteria during fermentation. Lactiplantibacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) strains as glucosidase-positive strains are starter cultures used to control the fermentation process. The [...] Read more.
Olive leaves are important by-products for the recovery of phenolic compounds and extracts with high phenolic content using lactic acid bacteria during fermentation. Lactiplantibacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) strains as glucosidase-positive strains are starter cultures used to control the fermentation process. The main objective of the present work is to determine the most effective strain for the biodegradation of oleuropein to hydroxytyrosol using two L. plantarum strains for the fermentation of olive leaves. Box–Behnken experimental design was applied to determine the optimum ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) conditions to obtain hydroxytyrosol-rich extract using the brine of the fermented leaves. L. plantarum ATCC 14917 (hydroxytyrosol; 126.89 ± 1.59 mg/L) strain showed higher oleuropeinolytic activity than L. plantarum ATCC-BAA 793 (85.93 ± 0.70 mg/L) in olive leaf brine. When the UAE method was applied, it was seen that the hydroxytyrosol concentration of samples that were inoculated with L. plantarum ATCC 14917 (362.29 ± 2.31 mg/L) compared to L. plantarum ATCC-BAA 793 (248.79 ± 4.14) increased. The optimum UAE conditions were determined as 30% amplitude-5 min-30% ethanol for ATCC 14917 and 45% amplitude-9 min-10% ethanol for BAA 793 strain. This study showed that the brines of fermented olive leaves with oleuropeinolytic strains can be considered high added value products. Full article
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30 pages, 5986 KiB  
Article
Screening and Application of Novel Homofermentative Lactic Acid Bacteria Results in Low-FODMAP Whole-Wheat Bread
by Małgorzata Borowska, Lilit Ispiryan, Emma Neylon, Aylin W. Sahin, Craig P. Murphy, Emanuele Zannini, Elke K. Arendt and Aidan Coffey
Fermentation 2023, 9(4), 336; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9040336 - 28 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2562
Abstract
FODMAPs are fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides, and polyols. The application of homofermentative lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been investigated as a promising approach for producing low-FODMAP whole-wheat bread. The low-FODMAP diet is recommended to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Wheat flour is staple [...] Read more.
FODMAPs are fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides, and polyols. The application of homofermentative lactic acid bacteria (LAB) has been investigated as a promising approach for producing low-FODMAP whole-wheat bread. The low-FODMAP diet is recommended to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Wheat flour is staple to many diets and is a significant source of fructans, which are considered FODMAPs. The reduction of fructans via sourdough fermentation, generally associated with heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria (LAB), often leads to the accumulation of other FODMAPs. A collection of 244 wild-type LAB strains was isolated from different environments and their specific FODMAP utilisation profiles established. Three homofermentative strains were selected for production of whole-wheat sourdough bread. These were Lactiplantibacillus plantarum FST1.7 (FST1.7), Lacticaseibacillus paracasei R3 (R3), and Pediococcus pentosaceus RYE106 (RYE106). Carbohydrate levels in flour, sourdoughs (before and after 48 h fermentation), and resulting breads were analysed via HPAEC-PAD and compared with whole-wheat bread leavened with baker’s yeast. While strain R3 was the most efficient in FODMAP reduction, breads produced with all three test strains had FODMAP content below cut-off levels that would trigger IBS symptoms. Results of this study highlighted the potential of homofermentative LAB in producing low-FODMAP whole-wheat bread. Full article
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13 pages, 890 KiB  
Article
Characterization of a Potential Probiotic Strain in Koumiss
by Hong-Zhe Zhao, Qian-Jin Song, Hao Guo, Chun-Yu Liu, Chao Yang, Xin Li, Ya-Xin Wang, Zi-Peng Ma, Feng-Xue Wang and Yong-Jun Wen
Fermentation 2023, 9(2), 87; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9020087 - 19 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1503
Abstract
Koumiss is a traditional fermented dairy product in Inner Mongolia pastoral areas, which is deeply loved by the local people; however, there has been little research on the characteristics of probiotics. This study comprehensively explored the properties of potential probiotics in koumiss, combining [...] Read more.
Koumiss is a traditional fermented dairy product in Inner Mongolia pastoral areas, which is deeply loved by the local people; however, there has been little research on the characteristics of probiotics. This study comprehensively explored the properties of potential probiotics in koumiss, combining in vitro assays and whole-genome sequencing. The biochemical identification and phylogenetic tree results showed that the branches of this strain were close to Lacticaseibacillus paracasei, indicating that the strain was L. paracasei. The agar diffusion assay showed that the strain could effectively inhibit the growth of pathogenic bacteria. We have also identified the CHAP structural domain at the genomic level, which may be associated with the antibacterial activity of this strain. The strain was well tolerated in a simulated gastrointestinal environment, growing well at pH = 2.5, 0.3% bile salts, and 5% NaCl while exhibiting hydrophobicity, aggregation, and antioxidant properties. In vitro experiments and genome, levels showed that resistance (resistance genes) to the antibiotics used in this study was not present in this strain. In addition, we did not observe toxic effects in acute oral administration in mice, and no virulence genes were identified at the genomic level. Therefore, the strain has the potential for probiotic development. Full article
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