Special Issue "Treatment Wetlands"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is concerned with treatment wetlands, which are artificial (or constructed) wetlands usually treating municipal or industrial wastewater, greywater and stormwater runoff. They are engineered systems that use natural processes, vegetation, soil and organisms to treat waters. Depending on the type of wastewater, the design of the treatment wetlands has to be adjusted, accordingly. Primary treatment of wastewater is recommended when there is a considerable amount of large suspended matter. However, treatment wetland outflow does not require further purification.

Similar to natural wetlands, treatment wetlands act as a biological filter and can remove a wide range of pollutants. These wetlands have been designed to remove fine suspended solids, organic matter, pathogens and nutrients. There are two main types of treatment wetlands: subsurface-flow and surface-flow. The planted vegetation and aggregates can play an important role in pollutant removal.

This Special Issue is particularly concerned with original research into the latest research developments in the wider treatment wetland area such as innovations in operation, integrated constructed wetlands and sustainable flood retention basins. However, critical and analytical reviews of recent trends are also encouraged.

I very much look forward to hearing about your research.

Prof. Dr. Miklas Scholz
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • decision support system
  • ecological engineering
  • integrated constructed wetland
  • pond
  • stormwater management
  • sustainable flood retention basin
  • treatment wetland
  • wastewater treatment
  • water quality control
  • water resources management

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

Editorial
Special Issue on Treatment Wetlands
Environments 2021, 8(4), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments8040030 - 12 Apr 2021
Viewed by 576
Abstract
This Special Issue is concerned with treatment wetlands, which are artificial (or constructed) wetlands usually treating municipal or industrial wastewater, greywater and storm water runoff [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Treatment Wetlands)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Article
Developments in Molecular Level Characterization of Naphthenic Acid Fraction Compounds Degradation in a Constructed Wetland Treatment System
Environments 2020, 7(10), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7100089 - 14 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1285
Abstract
The reclamation of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) is a matter of environmental importance because of the aquatic toxicity to biota. This study describes refinements in advanced analytical methods to assess the performance of biological treatment systems for OSPW, such as constructed wetland [...] Read more.
The reclamation of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) is a matter of environmental importance because of the aquatic toxicity to biota. This study describes refinements in advanced analytical methods to assess the performance of biological treatment systems for OSPW, such as constructed wetland treatment systems (CWTSs). Assessment of treatment efficiency by measurement of the degradation of naphthenic acid fraction compounds (NAFCs) in OSPW is challenging in CWTS due to potentially interfering constituents such as humic acids, organic acids, salts, and hydrocarbons. Here we have applied a previous weak anion exchange (WAX) solid-phase extraction (SPE) method and high-resolution Orbitrap-mass spectrometry (MS) to remove major interferences from the NAFC analysis. The refinements in data processing employing principal component analysis (PCA) indicates that the relative abundance of NAFCs decreased with time in the treated OSPW relative to the untreated OSPW. The most saturated NAFCs with higher carbon numbers were relatively more degraded as compared to unsaturated NAFCs. The use of Kendrick plots and van Krevelen plots for assessment of the performance of the CWTS is shown to be well-suited to detailed monitoring of the complex composition of NAFCs as a function of degradation. The developments and application of analytical methods such as the WAX SPE method and high-resolution Orbitrap-MS are demonstrated as tools enabling the advancement of CWTS design and optimization, enabling passive or semi-passive water treatment systems to be a viable opportunity for OSPW treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Treatment Wetlands)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Communication
Performance of a Woodchip Bioreactor for the Treatment of Nitrate-Laden Agricultural Drainage Water in Northeastern Germany
Environments 2020, 7(9), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7090071 - 15 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1348
Abstract
Reactive barriers, such as denitrifying bioreactors, have been identified as a clean-up option for nutrient-laden agriculture runoff. Here we tested a 20 m long, 3.75 m wide and 2.2 m deep woodchip bioreactor receiving tile drainage water from a 5.2 ha field site, [...] Read more.
Reactive barriers, such as denitrifying bioreactors, have been identified as a clean-up option for nutrient-laden agriculture runoff. Here we tested a 20 m long, 3.75 m wide and 2.2 m deep woodchip bioreactor receiving tile drainage water from a 5.2 ha field site, aiming at testing the hydraulic functioning of a dual-inlet system and quantifying its impact on nutrient loads (nitrogen, reactive phosphorus, organic carbon) in a region with a drainage season taking place in the hydrological winter (November to April). The hydraulic conditions in the dual-inlet bioreactor system developed differently than expected; asymmetric flow rates led to long average hydraulic retention times and a highly dispersed residence time distribution, which was revealed by a bromide tracer test. With a nitrate load reduction of 51 to 90% over three drainage seasons, the woodchip bioreactor proved at the same time to be very effective under the winter conditions of northeastern Germany. The bioreactor turned from an orthophosphate source in the first year of operation into an orthophosphate sink in the second and third year, which was not expected because of anoxic conditions (favorable for denitrification) prevailing within the woodchips. Besides an efficient nutrient retention, the woodchip bioreactor contributed to the total organic carbon load of receiving waters, which impairs the overall positive role of bioreactors within intensively agriculturally used landscapes. We consider this promising low-maintenance biotechnology particularly suitable for single drainage pipes with high discharge and high nitrate concentrations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Treatment Wetlands)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Treatment of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Oil Sands Process-Affected Water with a Surface Flow Treatment Wetland
Environments 2020, 7(9), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7090064 - 23 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1337
Abstract
This study applied a passive sampling approach using low-density polyethylene passive samplers to determine the treatment efficiency of the Kearl surface flow treatment wetland for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Oil Sands Process-affected Waters (OSPW). Treatment efficiency was measured as concentration-reduction and mass-removal [...] Read more.
This study applied a passive sampling approach using low-density polyethylene passive samplers to determine the treatment efficiency of the Kearl surface flow treatment wetland for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Oil Sands Process-affected Waters (OSPW). Treatment efficiency was measured as concentration-reduction and mass-removal from the OSPW. The results show that the wetland’s ability to remove individual PAHs from the influent varied substantially among the PAHs investigated. Treatment efficiencies of individual PAHs ranged between essentially 0% for certain methylated PAHs (e.g., 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene) to 95% for fluoranthene. Treatment in the Kearl wetland reduced the combined total mass of all detected PAHs by 54 to 83%. This corresponded to a reduction in the concentration of total PAHs in OSPW of 56 to 82% with inflow concentrations of total PAHs ranging from 7.5 to 19.4 ng/L. The concentration of pyrene in water fell below water quality targets in the Muskeg River Interim Management Framework as a result of wetland treatment. The application of the passive samplers for toxicity assessment showed that in this study PAHs in both the influent and effluent were not expected to cause acute toxicity. Passive sampling appeared to be a useful and cost-effective method for monitoring contaminants and for determining the treatment efficiency of contaminants in the treatment wetland. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Treatment Wetlands)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Assessment of Non-Anthropogenic Addition of Uric Acid to a Water Treatment Wetlands
Environments 2020, 7(8), 60; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7080060 - 05 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1438
Abstract
Artificial water-treatment wetlands can reduce nitrogen and phosphorous nutrient concentrations in wastewater effluent to improve water quality and decrease eutrophication in natural waters. The Orlando Easterly Wetlands (OEW) is an engineered wetland that polishes 57 million liters of wastewater per day, lowering the [...] Read more.
Artificial water-treatment wetlands can reduce nitrogen and phosphorous nutrient concentrations in wastewater effluent to improve water quality and decrease eutrophication in natural waters. The Orlando Easterly Wetlands (OEW) is an engineered wetland that polishes 57 million liters of wastewater per day, lowering the total nitrogen and phosphorous concentrations through biological, physical, and chemical processes. In addition to purifying the water, the wetlands provide habitat for avian, mammalian, reptilian and macroinvertebrate species. Previous research has shown that avian species affect the eutrophication of agricultural reservoirs near their roost. The research herein quantifies uric acid in avian and reptilian excretory product and tracks its concentration profile throughout the OEW over a seven-month period. This measure of the non-anthropogenic contribution to nitrogen within the park includes winter months when large numbers of migratory birds occupy the wetland. The enzymatic decomposition of uric acid and the subsequent fluorimetric analysis were used to quantify uric acid throughout the flow train of the OEW. High concentrations of 2–4 mg/L uric acid were found in the influent, but drastically declined to concentrations below 0.2 mg/L in the effluent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Treatment Wetlands)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop