Special Issue "Bioenergy from Organic Waste"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Bio-Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Cristina Cavinato
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca’ Foscari of Venice, via Torino 155, 30172 Mestre, Venice, Italy
Interests: anaerobic digestion, organic waste valorisation, biogas, environmental biotechnologies, bio-hydrogen, biohythane, dark fermentation, energy recovery, bioresource recovery, microalgae for wastewater treatment
Prof. Dr. David Bolzonella
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biotechnology, University of Verona, Strada Le Grazie 15, 37134 Verona, Italy
Interests: anaerobic digestion, wastewater treatment, circular economy, bio-economy, nutrients recovery, environmental biotechnologies, fermentation
Dr. Sergi Astals
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Chemistry, University of Barcelona, C/ Martí i Franquès, 1, 6th floor, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: environmental biotechnologies, anaerobic digestion, anaerobic co-digestion, fermentation, struvite precipitation, hygienisation, modelling, kinetics, microbial ecology, process integration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to invite you to submit a research paper or a review paper to a Special Issue of the journal Energies on the topic of “Bioenergy from Organic Waste”.

Organic waste produced in the agricultural, industrial and municipal sectors is a valuable material that is turning into the core business of biorefineries. From organic waste, and in particular from food waste, agricultural residue, food-processing waste and wastewater sludge, it is possible to recover a wide range of bioproducts, such as biofuels (biomethane, biohydrogen, biohythane, biodiesel) and resources (nutrients, bioplastics, volatile fatty acids and other high-added-value bioproducts). Nowadays, the challenge is to boost the biological conversion of organic waste, both by strengthening most applied technologies and by implementing innovative processes, fostering sustainable solutions with low environmental impact, including sustainable pre-treatment techniques.

This Special Issue is seeking original contributions regarding recent developments and ideas in the transformation of organic waste valorisation for energy recovery. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following: optimisation of the anaerobic digestion and co-digestion processes, dark fermentation, municipal and agricultural waste valorisation technologies, wastewater and organic waste integrated treatments, organic waste pre-treatment, microbial fuel cells, microalgae–wastewater integrated systems, and life-cycle assessment of waste treatment processes.

Dr. Cristina Cavinato
Prof. Dr. David Bolzonella
Dr. Sergi Astals
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • anaerobic digestion
  • co-digestion
  • organic waste treatment
  • energy recovery
  • microalgae–wastewater integrated systems
  • numerical modelling
  • process optimisation and control
  • biohydrogen and biohythane production
  • microbial fuel cells

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Experiments and Modeling for Flexible Biogas Production by Co-Digestion of Food Waste and Sewage Sludge
Energies 2020, 13(4), 818; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13040818 - 13 Feb 2020
Abstract
This paper explores the feasibility of flexible biogas production by co-digestion of food waste and sewage sludge based on experiments and mathematical modeling. First, laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in variable operating conditions in terms of organic loading rate and feeding frequency to [...] Read more.
This paper explores the feasibility of flexible biogas production by co-digestion of food waste and sewage sludge based on experiments and mathematical modeling. First, laboratory-scale experiments were carried out in variable operating conditions in terms of organic loading rate and feeding frequency to the digester. It is demonstrated that biogas production can achieve rapid responses to arbitrary feedings through co-digestion, and the stability of the anaerobic digestion process is not affected by the overloading of substrates. Compared with the conventional continuous mode, the required biogas storage capacity in flexible feeding mode can be significantly reduced. The optimum employed feeding organic loading rate (OLR) is identified, and how to adjust the feeding scheme for flexible biogas production is also discussed. Finally, a simplified prediction model for flexible biogas production is proposed and verified by experimental data, which could be conveniently used for demand-oriented control. It is expected that this research could give some theoretical basis for the enhancement of biogas utilization efficiency, thus expanding the applications of bio-energy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioenergy from Organic Waste)
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Open AccessArticle
Preliminary Assessment of a Biogas-Based Power Plant from Organic Waste in the North Netherlands
Energies 2019, 12(21), 4034; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12214034 - 23 Oct 2019
Abstract
Biogas is expected to play a crucial role in achieving the energy targets set by the European Union. Biogas, which mainly comprises methane and carbon dioxide, is produced in an anaerobic reactor, which transforms biomass into biogas. A consortium of anaerobic bacteria and [...] Read more.
Biogas is expected to play a crucial role in achieving the energy targets set by the European Union. Biogas, which mainly comprises methane and carbon dioxide, is produced in an anaerobic reactor, which transforms biomass into biogas. A consortium of anaerobic bacteria and archaea produces biogas during the anaerobic digestion (AD) of various types of feedstocks, such as animal slurries, energy crops, and agricultural residues. A biogas-fed gas turbine-generator and steam generator produce heat and power. In this study, a combined heat and power installation is studied. The biogas-based power plant treating cow manure, grass straw, and sugar beet pulp was examined using the software SuperPro Designer, and the obtained economic reports are evaluated. From the results, subsidy for electricity does not change the feasibility of the plants in case that cow manure or sugar beet pulp are used as feedstocks. The net present value (NPV) of biogas plants treating cow manure and sugar beet pulp was negative and the subsidy is not sufficient to make profitable these cases. The biogas power plant treating straw showed a positive net present value even without subsidy, which means that it is more desirable to invest in a plant that produces electricity and digestate from grass straw. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioenergy from Organic Waste)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Development Strategies and Technology Roadmap of Bioenergy for a Typical Region: A Case Study in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region in China
Energies 2020, 13(4), 844; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13040844 - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
The Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region has abundant biomass resources, which are difficult to collect and thus are underutilized. However, the potential estimation of biomass energy can result in a comprehensive understanding of bioenergy resources in order to establish a technology roadmap for the region’s bioenergy [...] Read more.
The Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region has abundant biomass resources, which are difficult to collect and thus are underutilized. However, the potential estimation of biomass energy can result in a comprehensive understanding of bioenergy resources in order to establish a technology roadmap for the region’s bioenergy development. Therefore, it is essential to estimate the potential of Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei biomass resources and bioenergy utilization. In this paper, the amount of main biomass resources for possible energy use and bioenergy utilization are calculated based on a statistical data estimation method for crop residues; human, poultry, and livestock manure; and municipal solid wastes. On the basis of biomass resources and bioenergy utilization potential, the technology roadmap is established. The results show that the amount for available biomass energy use is unevenly distributed in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, and the largest amount of resources is crop residues (36.52 million tons or 18.26 million tons coal equivalent). The biogas from human, poultry, and livestock manure and densified solids from crop residue technology roadmap is suitable for the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioenergy from Organic Waste)
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