Special Issue "Advances in Low Carbon Technologies and Transition"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Environment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Shigemi Kagawa Website E-Mail
Faculty of Economics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81-92-802-5513
Interests: environmental and energy economics; industrial ecology; environment, energy and resource management policy
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hidemichi Fujii Website E-Mail
Faculty of Economics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan
Phone: +81-92-802-5494
Interests: environmental and energy economics; corporate environmental management; productivity analysis; innovation; CO2 emissions reduction

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

A wide variety of low-carbon technologies and products have already spread in our society. However, policies have not been well implemented to effectively reduce CO2 emissions by promoting low-carbon technologies and products. Demand-side policies focus on maximzing a reduction in consumption-based CO2 emissions through replacing older products with higher CO2 emissions with newer products with lower CO2 emissions, whereas supply-side policies focus on minimizing production-based CO2 emissions on a production possibility frontier through achieving technological change and advancement. This Special Issue focuses on studies targeting specific products (e.g., motor vehicle, refrigerator, etc.) and/or specific technologies (e.g., steel-making technology, power generation technology, etc.) and quantifying CO2 emissions associated with products and technology systems using the reliable inventory database. Thus, this Special Issue welcomes high-quality papers on how policies can contribute to reducing CO2 emissions from consumption- and production-based perspectives.

Prof. Dr. Shigemi Kagawa
Prof. Dr. Hidemichi Fujii
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Policy
  • low-carbon technology
  • low-carbon product
  • product replacement
  • technological change
  • consumption-based CO2 emission
  • production-based CO2 emission
  • inventory database

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Banning Diesel Vehicles in London: Is 2040 Too Late?
Energies 2019, 12(18), 3495; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12183495 - 11 Sep 2019
Abstract
Air pollution contributes to 9400 deaths annually in London and diesel vehicles are considered a major source of lethal air pollutants. Consequently, the UK government announced its intention to ban diesel vehicles by 2040 to achieve a sustainable zero-carbon road transport system. Since [...] Read more.
Air pollution contributes to 9400 deaths annually in London and diesel vehicles are considered a major source of lethal air pollutants. Consequently, the UK government announced its intention to ban diesel vehicles by 2040 to achieve a sustainable zero-carbon road transport system. Since no empirical studies have used a bottom-up approach to seek Londoners’ views, it is therefore worth investigating the public opinion regarding this forthcoming ban. This paper aims to fill this research gap by taking London as a case study. A survey was designed, and fieldwork was conducted to distribute questionnaires to Londoners. Completed questionnaires were analysed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. The findings revealed that the majority of Londoners would be in favour of the ban if they were sufficiently exposed to the appropriate sources of information and were favourably disposed towards environmental protection measures. The results also showed that Londoners were more likely to switch to electric vehicles (EVs) if they were offered generous incentives and encouraged to use scrappage schemes. The present study makes a strong case for enforcing the ban well before 2040. The significance of this research is to provide clearer signals regarding the future of diesel vehicles, which in turn will strengthen the EV policy and uptake. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Low Carbon Technologies and Transition)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Resource Security Strategies and Their Environmental and Economic Implications: A Case Study of Copper Production in Japan
Energies 2019, 12(15), 3021; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12153021 - 06 Aug 2019
Abstract
Japan is a nation which is highly dependent on the import of raw materials to supply its manufacturing industry, notable among them copper. When extracting copper from ore, a large amount of energy is required, typically leading to high levels of CO2 [...] Read more.
Japan is a nation which is highly dependent on the import of raw materials to supply its manufacturing industry, notable among them copper. When extracting copper from ore, a large amount of energy is required, typically leading to high levels of CO2 emissions due to the fossil fuel-dominated energy mix. Moreover, maintaining security of raw material supply is difficult if imports are the only source utilized. This study examines the environmental and economic impacts of domestic mineral production from the recycling of end-of-life products and deep ocean mining as strategies to reduce CO2 emissions and enhance security of raw material supplies. The results indicate that under the given assumptions, recycling, which is typically considered to be less CO2 intensive, produces higher domestic emissions than current copper processing, although across the whole supply chain shows promise. As the total quantity of domestic resources from deep ocean ores are much smaller than the potential from recycling, it is possible that recycling could become a mainstream supply alternative, while deep ocean mining is more likely to be a niche supply source. Implications of a progressively aging society and flow-on impacts for the recycling sector are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Low Carbon Technologies and Transition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
How Does Information and Communication Technology Capital Affect Productivity in the Energy Sector? New Evidence from 14 Countries, Considering the Transition to Renewable Energy Systems
Energies 2019, 12(9), 1786; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12091786 - 10 May 2019
Abstract
By focusing on a distributed energy system that has been widely diffused for efficient utilization of renewable energy generation in recent years, this paper investigates the relationship between productivity growth and information and communications technology capital in the energy sector. Information and communications [...] Read more.
By focusing on a distributed energy system that has been widely diffused for efficient utilization of renewable energy generation in recent years, this paper investigates the relationship between productivity growth and information and communications technology capital in the energy sector. Information and communications technology is a key factor in operating distributed energy systems in a way that balances energy supply and demand in order to minimize energy loss and to enhance capacity utilization. The objective of this study is to clarify the determining factors that affect productivity growth, focusing on three different information and communications technologies: information technology capital, communication technology capital and software capital. Our estimation sample covers energy sectors in 14 countries from 2000 to 2014. The results show that information technology and software capital contribute to increasing material productivity and capital productivity in the energy sector, respectively. Meanwhile, communication technology capital negatively affects these two productivity indicators. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Low Carbon Technologies and Transition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Sources of China’s Fossil Energy-Use Change
Energies 2019, 12(4), 699; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12040699 - 21 Feb 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Technology improvement related to energy conservation and energy mix low-carbonization is a critical approach for tackling global warming in China. Therefore, we attempt to identify the technology factors of China’s energy consumption change between 2007 and 2012, when China’s economy started slowing. This [...] Read more.
Technology improvement related to energy conservation and energy mix low-carbonization is a critical approach for tackling global warming in China. Therefore, we attempt to identify the technology factors of China’s energy consumption change between 2007 and 2012, when China’s economy started slowing. This study proposes a new refined structural decomposition analysis (SDA) based on a hybrid multi-regional input–output (MRIO) model. The technology factors are expressed through the energy input level effect, energy composition effect, and non-energy input effect. We find that the energy level effect was the primary driver for energy reduction, saving 1205 million tonnes of standard coal equivalent (Mtce) of energy, while 520 Mtce was offset by energy composition and non-energy input effects. The sector analysis shows that the energy input level, energy composition, and non-energy input effects of electricity, the chemical industry, and metallurgy are noteworthy. In addition, the sector contribution to energy-use change, by province, related to the three effects, is also studied. From these results, we propose policy suggestions for further energy saving, in order to achieve China’s energy target through technology improvements by the higher priority contributors identified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Low Carbon Technologies and Transition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Lifecycle Analysis of the Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards in Japan
Energies 2019, 12(4), 677; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12040677 - 20 Feb 2019
Abstract
This study estimated the corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) and CAFE targets of Japan’s domestic automobile manufacturers and evaluated whether manufactures have achieved these estimated CAFE targets. Furthermore, an analysis framework was proposed for estimating what impact the introduction of the CAFE standards [...] Read more.
This study estimated the corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) and CAFE targets of Japan’s domestic automobile manufacturers and evaluated whether manufactures have achieved these estimated CAFE targets. Furthermore, an analysis framework was proposed for estimating what impact the introduction of the CAFE standards in Japan will have on motor vehicle-derived lifecycle CO2 emissions. As a result, the following was found: (1) Automobile manufacturers can maximize their sales under the constraints of the CAFE standards, but vehicle sales plans based on sales maximization will lower their CAFE standard scores. (2) Economically optimal automobile manufacturer behavior—striving to achieve CAFE standards while maximizing sales—will increase the manufacturers’ overall carbon footprint and actually worsen the environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Low Carbon Technologies and Transition)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop