Special Issue "Grid-Connected Converters"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Smart Grids and Microgrids".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 December 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Marcel A. M. Hendrix
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Interests: design automation; large-scale (cluster) computing; IC development; system simulation; modeling; discrete-time control techniques; (hybrid) switched-capacitor power conversion
Prof. Dr. Maurice G. L. Roes
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Interests: power electronics; digital control; modern control theory; state estimation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Grid-connected converters are an essential part of the electricity distribution infrastructure. They connect the generator to the end user and are applied to many of the intermediate links. Although the use of power electronics in grid-connected installations is far from new, much progress is still being made, and is dearly needed, given, e.g., the growing penetration of fast charging stations for electric vehicles, increased interest in solid state transformers, widespread distributed generation, and the expected growth of distributed storage. Especially, research into multilevel power converter topologies and the introduction of wide bandgap semiconductor devices have sparked interest in using power converters in medium-to-high voltage applications. A further trend is that advanced control methods—model predictive control, iterative learning control, repetitive control, etc.—have found their way into grid-connected converters, promising to increase performance in terms of grid stabilization and voltage and power quality. Advanced modelling and control techniques provide a way of dealing with the decentralization of power flow control that is required in grids where the power generation is widely dispersed, as well as with predicting and combatting stability issues that occur when connecting a multitude of client-side converters to the public grid.

This Special Issue focuses on all aspects related to grid-connected power converters. We encourage every researcher working in this field to submit his or her work for consideration.

Prof. Dr. Marcel A. M. Hendrix
Prof. Dr. Maurice G. L. Roes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • grid-connected converter 
  • power converter topologies 
  • control 
  • power quality 
  • distributed generation 
  • solid state transformer 
  • power management 
  • microgrid

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A New Buck-Boost AC/DC Converter with Two-Terminal Output Voltage for DC Nano-Grid
Energies 2019, 12(20), 3808; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12203808 - 09 Oct 2019
Abstract
Due to the development and deployment of renewable DC power sources and their inherent advantages for DC loads in applications, the DC nano-grid has attracted more and more research attentions; especially the topologies of AC/DC converters are increasingly studied. When designing an AC [...] Read more.
Due to the development and deployment of renewable DC power sources and their inherent advantages for DC loads in applications, the DC nano-grid has attracted more and more research attentions; especially the topologies of AC/DC converters are increasingly studied. When designing an AC to DC converter for a DC nano-grid system, the grounding configuration, which determines the costs, the efficiency as well as the safety, plays an important role. A three-terminal output AC to DC converter based on united grounding configuration has been presented for DC nano-grid. However, it has to be pointed out that the three-terminal output DC nano-grid is not as popular as the two-terminal DC output one, due to the infrastructure consideration. This paper proposes a new Buck-Boost AC to DC converter with two-terminal output voltage for DC nano-grid. The operating principle, the steady-state analysis, and the small signal modelling for the proposed converter working in continuous conduction mode are presented in detail. A 220 V/50 Hz/800 W prototype was fabricated to verify the effectiveness of the proposed converter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Grid-Connected Converters)
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Open AccessArticle
Small-Signal Modelling and Stability Assessment of Phase-Locked Loops in Weak Grids
Energies 2019, 12(7), 1227; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12071227 - 30 Mar 2019
Abstract
This paper proposes a low-complexity small signal model for a 3-leg converter connected to a balanced three-phase, three-wire weak grid and synchronised to this grid using a PLL implemented in a synchronous rotating d-q axis. A thorough analysis of the system stability as [...] Read more.
This paper proposes a low-complexity small signal model for a 3-leg converter connected to a balanced three-phase, three-wire weak grid and synchronised to this grid using a PLL implemented in a synchronous rotating d-q axis. A thorough analysis of the system stability as a function of the PLL bandwidth and the short circuit ratio (SCR) of the grid is performed based on a linearised model. By using the proposed model, an improved design process is proposed for the commonly used dq-PLL that accounts for the potential stability issues which may occur in weak grids. Using the proposed approach, it is possible to optimise the PLL design to find the fastest PLL that can operate stably considering the SCR of the grid. In addition, the proposed model is very simple, resulting in a straightforward design tool that could also be used for online stability monitoring. The method is validated through simulations and experimental results from a 5kW laboratory system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Grid-Connected Converters)
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