Special Issue "Renewable Energy for Water Desalination"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Veera Gnaneswar Gude
Website
Guest Editor
Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762, USA
Interests: N–E–W (nutrient–energy–water) nexus; biofuels; desalination and wastewater treatment
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Vasilis Fthenakis
Website
Guest Editor
Center for Life Cycle Analysis, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027, USA
Interests: Life Cycle Analysis; Desalination; Solar Energy; Renewable Energy Penetration in the Grid; Fluid Dynamics; Air Pollution Prevention and Control
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nearly 40% of the world’s population suffers from a shortage of water. By 2050, this number could reach four billion. Many countries have already opted for the desalination of brackish or seawater to meet their needs; but can this option be viewed as sustainable? While Seawater desalination can provide a climate-independent source of drinking water, the process is energy-intensive and environmentally damaging. This Special Issue on “Renewable Energy for Water Desalination” provides readers with the latest methods, processes, and technologies available for utilizing renewable energy as a valuable resource that reduces environmental impact and reduces operational costs.

Desalination using renewable energy sources can provide a sustainable pathway to produce fresh water. It is expected to become economically attractive as the costs of renewable technologies continue to decline and the prices of fossil fuels continue to increase. Comprehensive in its coverage, this Special Issue includes: Solar, wind, geothermal and nuclear desalination, perspectives, challenges, issues, process implementation and future strategies. Basics, principles and thermodynamics of novel desalination and renewable energy technologies will be considered. Socio-economic, environmental and ecological aspects related to renewable energy powered water desalination will be covered. Highlights of the Special Issue topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Renewable energy sources such as: Nuclear, geothermal, solar and wind powered desalination and energy storage and optimization
  • Energy recovery schemes, optimization and process controls, power-water-cooling schemes
  • Trigeneration and polygeneation schemes for integrated resource management
  • Principles of thermodynamics and second law efficiencies to improve process performance for various renewable energy driven desalination processes
  • Global applicability and potential and possible implementation issues of solar, wind, geothermal, and nuclear energy sources and case studies
  • Renewable energy-desalinated water optimization schemes for island, inland, remote and coastal communities
Prof. Veera Gnaneswar Gude
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Desalination
  • Renewable energy
  • Water treatment
  • Energy-water nexus
  • Renewable energy – environment nexus
  • Energy conservation
  • Sustainability
  • Water supply
  • Energy storage

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Transboundary Exchanges of Renewable Energy and Desalinated Water in the Middle East
Energies 2019, 12(8), 1455; https://doi.org/10.3390/en12081455 - 17 Apr 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
The Levant area of the Middle East suffers from both chronic water scarcity and high population growth. It is also a region highly dependent of fossil fuels. In order to address current and expected water demands, several countries in the region, including Israel, [...] Read more.
The Levant area of the Middle East suffers from both chronic water scarcity and high population growth. It is also a region highly dependent of fossil fuels. In order to address current and expected water demands, several countries in the region, including Israel, Jordan and the Palestinian Authority (PA), are depending increasingly on desalination, which is expected to intensify energy consumption and energy related emissions. Given that the region also benefits from high levels of solar irradiation nearly year-round, much attention has been given to the possibility of developing renewable energy in general and for desalination specifically. This paper presents partial results of a pre-feasibility study assessing the prospects of transfers of desalinated water from Israel and/or the PA, which have access to the Mediterranean Sea, to Jordan, in exchange for renewable solar-produced electricity from Jordan, which, unlike its neighbors, has an abundance of available open space suitable for solar production. The analysis shows that single-axis tracking photovoltaic (PV) systems appear to be the most economically feasible option. Moreover, the study shows that the proposed idea of international cooperation and water-energy exchanges, while facing political obstacles, could provide numerous economic, environmental and geopolitical benefits to all parties involved. As such, an arrangement such as that examined may be a more promising means of promoting both desalination and renewable energy than if each country unilaterally develops desalination and renewable energy in isolation from one another. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy for Water Desalination)
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Open AccessArticle
Marine Current Energy Converters to Power a Reverse Osmosis Desalination Plant
Energies 2018, 11(11), 2880; https://doi.org/10.3390/en11112880 - 24 Oct 2018
Cited by 1
Abstract
Some countries are facing issues on freshwater and electricity production, which can be addressed with the use of renewable energy powered desalination systems. In the following study, a reverse osmosis desalination plant powered by marine current energy converters is suggested. The marine current [...] Read more.
Some countries are facing issues on freshwater and electricity production, which can be addressed with the use of renewable energy powered desalination systems. In the following study, a reverse osmosis desalination plant powered by marine current energy converters is suggested. The marine current energy converters are designed at Uppsala University in Sweden, specifically for utilizing low water speeds (1–2 m/s). Estimations on freshwater production for such a system, in South Africa, facing the Indian Ocean was presented and discussed. It is concluded that the desalination plant cannot by itself supply freshwater for a population all the time, due to periods of too low water speeds (<1 m/s), but for 75% of the time. By using ten marine current energy converters, each with a nominal power rating of 7.5 kW, combined with a reverse osmosis desalination plant and water storage capacity of 2800 m3, it is possible to cover the basic freshwater demand of 5000 people. More studies on the hydrokinetic resource of the Western Indian Ocean, system cost, technology development, environmental and social aspects are necessary for more accurate results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Renewable Energy for Water Desalination)
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