Special Issue "Changes of Global Energy Systems"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Environment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Sara Giarola
Website
Guest Editor
Earth Science&Engineering Department, Imperial College London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom
Interests: multiscale modelling and optimisation of energy systems; sociotechnical energy systems transitions; climate change mitigation; biorefineries

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims at contributing to the energy policy dialogue by bringing forth scientific and multidisciplinary knowledge to explore, assess and validate analyses of the energy systems transitions and their feasibility in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Emphasis will be given to research contributions on the intersection between energy systems transition modelling and climate change mitigation, focusing on the water, energy and food nexus, as well as highlighting the role that the society can play on the energy systems transition pace.

The Special Issue on “Changes of Global Energy Systems” aims to systematically explore feasibility and robustness of the energy systems change in the context of keeping global warming below 1.5 °C (or 2 °C) compared to pre-industrial time. With this Special Issue, we aim to comprehensively frame a discussion about status, potentials, limits, and barriers to deep decarbonisation. In view of this, we welcome papers and reviews regarding novel mathematical approaches, policy analyses, case studies, as well as novel indicators development to model and monitor the energy systems transitions either at a sectoral, national or at a global level. The issue structure will rely upon (but not be limited to) coverage of the following topics:

  1. Enabling CO2 and non-CO2 emissions reductions beyond global net zero, including mitigation efforts in demand and supply side of the energy system,;
  2. Robustness and validation of energy systems pathways via feasibility assessment of negative emission technologies deployment, renewables penetration, storage uptake, energy systems electrification, digitalisation;
  3. Modelling behavioural changes due to global warming mitigation;
  4. Interlinks of energy systems change with climate action, food and water conservation;
  5. Equity in distributional mitigation costs.

Dr. Sara Giarola
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • net-zero emissions
  • mitigation of CO2 and non-CO2 emissions
  • behavioural changes and sustainable lifestyles
  • equity in climate policy
  • energy, food and water nexus
  • technology transitions of the energy systems
  • Sustainable Development Goals
  • negative emission technologies
  • digitalisation
  • carbon budget estimates

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Assessment of Greenhouse Gases and Pollutant Emissions in the Road Freight Transport Sector: A Case Study for São Paulo State, Brazil
Energies 2020, 13(20), 5433; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13205433 - 18 Oct 2020
Abstract
This study analyzes the road freight sector of São Paulo state to identify the best options to reduce greenhouse gases emissions and local pollutants, such as particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons. Additionally, the investment cost of each vehicle is also [...] Read more.
This study analyzes the road freight sector of São Paulo state to identify the best options to reduce greenhouse gases emissions and local pollutants, such as particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons. Additionally, the investment cost of each vehicle is also analyzed. Results show that electric options, including hybrid, battery, and hydrogen fuel-cell electric vehicles represent the best options to reduce pollutants and greenhouse gases emissions concomitantly, but considerable barriers for their deployment are still in place. With little long-term planning on the state level, electrification of the transport system, in combination with increased renewable electricity generation, would require considerable financial support to achieve the desired emissions reductions without increasing energy insecurity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Changes of Global Energy Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Energy Performance of the European Union Countries in Terms of Reaching the European Energy Union Objectives
Energies 2020, 13(20), 5317; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13205317 - 13 Oct 2020
Abstract
European energy policy, especially the project of the Energy Union, is one of the most rapidly developing areas of the EU, and one through which European institutions are obtaining gradually more extensive power over the performance of the national energy sectors. The paper [...] Read more.
European energy policy, especially the project of the Energy Union, is one of the most rapidly developing areas of the EU, and one through which European institutions are obtaining gradually more extensive power over the performance of the national energy sectors. The paper focuses on an analysis of the energy performance of EU member states (MS) with regard to the priorities of the European Energy Union. For an assessment of the energy performance of EU countries, the Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) was chosen, using the Coefficient of Variation method (CV) as an objective method for determining the weights of eight input indicators, including CO2 intensity, electricity and gas price, energy productivity, energy dependence, consumption of renewables and research and development. The analysis for the period from 2008 to 2016 showed significant changes in the input indicators, which directly influenced the results of both methods mentioned above. Long-term differences between the best- and worst-rated countries are seen mainly in CO2 emissions, energy imports and total consumption of renewable energy sources. It is these aspects of comprehensive energy performance and their convergence at the level of EU countries that we believe should be addressed in the near future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Changes of Global Energy Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
Gini and Entropy-Based Spread Indexes for Primary Energy Consumption Efficiency and CO2 Emission
Energies 2020, 13(18), 4938; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13184938 - 21 Sep 2020
Abstract
Primary energy consumption is one of the key drivers of global CO2 emissions that, in turn, heavily depends on the efficiency of involved technologies. Either improvement in technology efficiency or the expansion of non-fossil fuel consumption requires large investments. The planning and [...] Read more.
Primary energy consumption is one of the key drivers of global CO2 emissions that, in turn, heavily depends on the efficiency of involved technologies. Either improvement in technology efficiency or the expansion of non-fossil fuel consumption requires large investments. The planning and financing of such investments by global policy makers or global energy firms require, in turn, reliable measures of associated global spread and their evolution in time, at least from the point of view of the principles for responsible investment (PRI). In this paper, our main contribution is the introduction of index measures for accessing global spread (that is, measures of inequality or inhomogeneity in the statistical distribution of a related quantity of interest) of technology efficiency and CO2 emission in primary energy consumption. These indexes are based on the Gini index, as used in economical sciences, and generalized entropy measures. Regarding primary energy sources, we consider petroleum, coal, natural gas, and non-fossil fuels. Between our findings, we attest some stable relations in the evolution of global spreads of technology efficiency and CO2 emission and a positive relation between changes in global spread of technology efficiency and use of non-fossil fuel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Changes of Global Energy Systems)
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