Special Issue "Advanced Technologies for Biomass"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Bio-Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Andrea Di Carlo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial and Information Engineering and Economics, University of L’Aquila, Piazzale Ernesto Pontieri, Monteluco di Roio, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
Interests: biomass gasification; hydrogen energy; chemical engineering; thermochemical processes
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Elisa Savuto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Industrial and Information Engineering and Economics, University of L’Aquila, Piazzale Ernesto Pontieri, Monteluco di Roio, 67100 L’Aquila, Italy
Interests: biomass gasification; hydrogen energy; energy engineering; hot gas cleaning and conditioning

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of biomass or organic waste material as primary resources for the production of fuels, chemicals, or electric power is gaining in importance due to the environmental issues correlated with the use of fossil fuels. For this reason, new and more efficient technologies for the conversion of biomass must be investigated and developed. Advanced methods can be used for the conversion of biomass. These methods are broadly classified into thermochemical conversion, biochemical conversion, and electrochemical conversion. This Special Issue invites papers that consider the various aspects of sustainability in biomass conversion to valuable products, covering all the technical chains from biomass production to residue management and, in particular, experimental and simulation works that investigate new processes and technologies at industrial, pilot, and bench scales.

Topics of interests include, but are not restricted to:

  • New biomass resources
  • Advanced processes for energetic conversion of biomass
  • Bioplastic production
  • Biofuel production
  • Biomass pretreatment, like hydrothermal carbonization or torrefaction
  • Residue management after biomass conversion
  • Life cycle assessment

Prof. Dr. Andrea Di Carlo
Dr. Elisa Savuto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomass
  • Bioplastic
  • Bioenergy
  • Biofuel

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Design of a 1 MWth Pilot Plant for Chemical Looping Gasification of Biogenic Residues
Energies 2021, 14(9), 2581; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14092581 - 30 Apr 2021
Viewed by 347
Abstract
Chemical looping gasification (CLG) is a promising process for the thermochemical solid to liquid conversion route using lattice oxygen, provided by a solid oxygen carrier material, to produce a nitrogen free synthesis gas. Recent advances in lab-scale experiments show that CLG with biomass [...] Read more.
Chemical looping gasification (CLG) is a promising process for the thermochemical solid to liquid conversion route using lattice oxygen, provided by a solid oxygen carrier material, to produce a nitrogen free synthesis gas. Recent advances in lab-scale experiments show that CLG with biomass has the possibility to produce a carbon neutral synthesis gas. However, all experiments have been conducted in externally heated units, not enabling autothermal operation. In this study, the modification of an existing pilot plant for demonstrating autothermal operation of CLG is described. Energy and mass balances are calculated using a validated chemical looping combustion process model extended for biomass gasification. Based on six operational cases, adaptations of the pilot plant are designed and changes discussed. A reactor configuration using two circulating fluidized bed reactors with internal solid circulation in the air reactor is proposed and a suitable operating strategy devised. The resulting experimental unit enables a reasonable range of operational parameters within restrictions imposed from autothermal operation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Technologies for Biomass)
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Article
Experimental Study of Absorbent Hygiene Product Devolatilization in a Bubbling Fluidized Bed
Energies 2021, 14(9), 2399; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14092399 - 23 Apr 2021
Viewed by 235
Abstract
This paper aims to investigate the usage of waste from Absorbent Hygienic Products (AHP) as a fuel for gasification or pyrolysis, two attractive routes to obtain valuable products and dispose of this kind of waste. The study experimentally investigated the devolatilization of coarsely [...] Read more.
This paper aims to investigate the usage of waste from Absorbent Hygienic Products (AHP) as a fuel for gasification or pyrolysis, two attractive routes to obtain valuable products and dispose of this kind of waste. The study experimentally investigated the devolatilization of coarsely shredded materials from diapers, in a laboratory-scale bubbling fluidized bed made of sand, as a representative preparatory step of the above-mentioned thermochemical conversions. Two versions of shredded materials were considered: as-manufactured diapers (AHPam, as a reference), and the cellulosic fraction of sterilized used diapers (AHPus). Results were presented, obtained from physical-chemical characterization of AHPam and AHPus (TGA, CHNS/O, proximate and ultimate analyses, XRF, ICP-AES, SEM-EDS), as well as from their devolatilizations at 500–600–700–800 °C under two different atmospheres (air plus nitrogen, or pure nitrogen as a reference). Generally, temperature influenced syngas composition the most, with better performances under pure nitrogen. At 700–800 °C under pure nitrogen, the highest syngas quality and yield were obtained. For AHPam and AHPus, respectively: (i) H2 equaled 29.5 vol% and 23.7 vol%, while hydrocarbons equaled 14.8 vol% and 7.4 vol% on dry, dilution-free basis; (ii) 53.7 Nl and 46.0 Nl of syngas were produced, per 100 g of fuel. Overall, AHP emerged as an interesting fuel for thermochemical conversions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Technologies for Biomass)
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Article
Utilization of Agricultural and Livestock Waste in Anaerobic Digestion (A.D): Applying the Biorefinery Concept in a Circular Economy
Energies 2020, 13(17), 4428; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13174428 - 27 Aug 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 766
Abstract
There has been intense debate over the depletion of fossil fuel reserves in recent decades as well as the greenhouse gas emissions that are causing climate change. At the same time, new legislation in Greece, national policies, European policies, and realistic needs, need [...] Read more.
There has been intense debate over the depletion of fossil fuel reserves in recent decades as well as the greenhouse gas emissions that are causing climate change. At the same time, new legislation in Greece, national policies, European policies, and realistic needs, need effective waste management and the protection of national resources. As a result, it seems a necessity to exploit waste treatments, while expanding the use of renewable energy sources. In this study, an attempt is made to focus our interest and research on a specific biomass waste stream, namely the waste biomass from the agricultural-livestock sector. The possibility of processing these wastes through the technology of biomass biorefinery with anaerobic digestion as its central process will be studied. The technology of anaerobic digestion is a process widely used for the treatment of agricultural residues and livestock waste as well as for the exploitation of energy crops (energy development, soil enhancement) mainly in countries in Europe and globally. This study reviews the biorefinery biomass technology, the energy production technology, production of biofuels, and new materials from waste biomass at the behest of the circular economy and bioeconomy. Additionally, this research will be an introduction in maximizing the potential of the full utilization of agricultural and livestock waste, and the by-products that can be produced from these processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Technologies for Biomass)
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Article
Rapid Determination of Wood and Rice Husk Pellets’ Proximate Analysis and Heating Value
Energies 2020, 13(14), 3741; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13143741 - 20 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 690
Abstract
Biomass pellets are a potential renewable and clean energy source. With the advantages of perfect combustion performance and easy storage and transport, biomass pellets have gradually replaced fossil fuels and become widely used. Rapid and accurate determination of biomass pellets’ quality is critical [...] Read more.
Biomass pellets are a potential renewable and clean energy source. With the advantages of perfect combustion performance and easy storage and transport, biomass pellets have gradually replaced fossil fuels and become widely used. Rapid and accurate determination of biomass pellets’ quality is critical to efficient energy use. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) combined with chemometric methods were utilized. The gross calorific value (CV) and ash content (Ash), volatile matter (VM) and fixed carbon (FC) were firstly measured and analyzed. LIBS spectra and their corresponding elements of biomass pellet samples were analyzed. Three quantitative analysis models for quality indexes including partial least-squares regression (PLSR), least squares-support vector machines (LS-SVM), extreme learning machines (ELM) were further built. All models performed well, especially the LS-SVM model which obtained the best determination results, with all R2 values over 0.95. Concurrently, the modeling performance of ash was slightly better than that of the other three quality indexes, which further confirmed the feasibility of using relevant elements to predict biomass quality indexes. The overall results indicated that LIBS coupled with suitable chemometrics could be an alternative promising method to determine quality indexes of biomass pellets and further improve energy utilization by using biomass materials with better quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Technologies for Biomass)
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