Topical Collection "Printed and Flexible Electronics"

Editor

Collection Editor
Prof. Dr. Yuning Li Website E-Mail
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo, 200 University Ave West, Waterloo, ON, N2L 3G1, Canada
Interests: printed electronics; organic thin film transistors; organic photovoltaics; sensors; photodetectors; organic semiconductors; batteries

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Printed and flexible electronics have drawn much attention in recent years. This interest has been driven by two main factors. On one hand, there is an increased availability of solution-processable organic materials or nanomaterials, which enables the fabrication of electronics using printing techniques at significantly lower costs in comparison to the traditional silicon technology; on the other hand, there have been increasing demands for flexible and lightweight devices due to the increasing use of portable electronics and the growing prevalence of the Internet of Things (IoT) technology. Printing techniques and some other deposition methods such as thermal evaporation, sputtering, and chemical vapor deposition (CVD), can be utilized alone or in combination to fabricate flexible electronics.   

The aim of this topical collection is to present the latest developments in printed and flexible electronics. It will cover various electronic devices including, but not limited to, field-effect transistors or thin-film transistors, logic circuits, photovoltaics or solar cells, memory devices, bio- and chemical sensors, smart labels, and photodetectors, both printed (solution-processed) and flexible.

Prof. Dr. Yuning Li
Collection Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Electronics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Printed electronics
  • Flexible electronics
  • Plastic electronics
  • Organic electronics
  • Wearable electronics
  • Stretchable Electronics
  • Transistors
  • Photovoltaics
  • Light-emitting diodes
  • Sensors

Published Papers (1 paper)

2019

Open AccessArticle
Eco-Friendly Materials for Daily-Life Inexpensive Printed Passive Devices: Towards “Do-It-Yourself” Electronics
Electronics 2019, 8(6), 699; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics8060699 - 21 Jun 2019
Abstract
The need for the fabrication of a new generation of devices has developed with the next generation of ‘home’ engineers, which is resulting in an ever-increasing population interested in “do-it-yourself” electronics and the Internet of Things. However, this new trend should not be [...] Read more.
The need for the fabrication of a new generation of devices has developed with the next generation of ‘home’ engineers, which is resulting in an ever-increasing population interested in “do-it-yourself” electronics and the Internet of Things. However, this new trend should not be done at the expense of the environment. Almost all previous studies, related to the low-temperature processing of devices, fail to highlight the extent of the impact that the synthesis of these technologies have on both the environment and human health. In addition, the substrates typically used, are also often associated with major drawbacks such as a lack of biodegradability. In this paper, we fabricate a simple RC filter using various domestically available printing techniques, utilising readily available materials such as: carbon soots (carbon black) as an electric conductor, and egg white (albumen) as a dielectric. These devices have been fabricated on both polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and paper, which demonstrated the same performances on both substrates and revealed that recyclable substrates can be used without compromise to the devices’ performance. The filter was found to exhibit a cut-off frequency of 170 kHz, which made it suitable for high-frequency reception applications. Full article
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Figure 1

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