Special Issue "Millimeter-Wave-Integrated CMOS Radars and Communication Systems: Architecture and Circuit Designs"

A special issue of Electronics (ISSN 2079-9292). This special issue belongs to the section "Circuit and Signal Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Egidio Ragonese
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica e Informatica (DIEEI), Università di Catania, 95125 Catania, Italy
Interests: radio frequency (RF) and millimeter wave (mm wave) integrated circuits/systems; integrated radars
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Angelo Scuderi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
RF Competence Center in Automotive Product Group, STMicroelectronics, Italy
Interests: radio frequency (RF) and millimeter wave (mm wave) integrated circuits/systems; integrated radars

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the 2000s, radar systems became available as standard equipment even for lower cost vehicles, thanks to the diversification of radar-based applications, which now include automatic emergency braking systems, adaptive cruise control, blind spot detection, intelligent parking assistance, forward collision warning, etc. Most modern commercial radars host their key functions in two chips: a microcontroller and a SiGe BiCMOS chip which drives the TX and RX antennas, and integrates all the RF functions, the ADC/DAC conversions, and the basic baseband functions. The Holy Grail for next generation automotive radars is the implementation of a system‑on‑chip (SoC) sensor in CMOS technology. Despite the great amount of research produced in the last ten years, most CMOS radar implementations are targeted only to short/medium range applications and are very far from proposing actual solutions for a long-range radar sensor. Technical problems are still present and mm-wave designers from academia and industry are working on these. This bottleneck is still represented by the implementation of a high-performance mm‑wave radio front-end. Research efforts are now being made to integrate all the sensors into CMOS technology, which will provide higher data processing capacity in the digital domain, lower power consumption, and costs. Since nanoscale CMOS is also able to cope with communication applications up to the mm-wave spectrum (e.g., 5G), this poses CMOS as the dominant process over BiCMOS in the next future.

This Special Issue will host the latest results in the field of integrated mm-wave CMOS ICs for radar and communication, with a focus on circuit design, architectures, component modelling, electromagnetic (EM) simulation, SoC integration, advanced package-to-chip co‑design, and antenna-to-chip co-design.

The topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Mm-wave CMOS front-end circuits (LNAs, mixers, VGAs, T/R switches, amplifiers, filters, demodulators)
  • CMOS Oscillators and frequency synthesizers (VCOs, frequency dividers, multipliers, PLLs, charge pumps)
  • CMOS transmitters and power amplifiers for mm-wave applications
  • Integrated radar sensors
  • mm-wave communication circuits and systems-on-chip

Prof. Dr. Egidio Ragonese
Dr. Angelo Scuderi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Electronics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • radar sensors
  • mm-wave CMOS ICs
  • CMOS power amplifiers
  • CMOS low noise amplifiers (LNA) mm-wave mixers
  • CMOS oscillators for mm-wave systems
  • radar transceivers
  • mm-wave antennas for integrated radars
  • mm-wave packaging

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
40 GHz VCO and Frequency Divider in 28 nm FD-SOI CMOS Technology for Automotive Radar Sensors
Electronics 2021, 10(17), 2114; https://doi.org/10.3390/electronics10172114 - 31 Aug 2021
Viewed by 576
Abstract
This paper presents a 40 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) and frequency divider chain fabricated in STMicroelectronics 28 nm ultrathin body and box (UTBB) fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (FD-SOI) complementary metal-oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) process with eight metal layers back-end-of-line (BEOL) option. VCOs architecture is based on [...] Read more.
This paper presents a 40 GHz voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) and frequency divider chain fabricated in STMicroelectronics 28 nm ultrathin body and box (UTBB) fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (FD-SOI) complementary metal-oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) process with eight metal layers back-end-of-line (BEOL) option. VCOs architecture is based on an LC-tank with p-type metal-oxide–semiconductor (PMOS) cross-coupled transistors. VCOs exhibit a tuning range (TR) of 3.5 GHz by exploiting two continuous frequency tuning bands selectable via a single control bit. The measured phase noise (PN) at 38 GHz carrier frequency is −94.3 and −118 dBc/Hz at 1 and 10 MHz frequency offset, respectively. The high-frequency dividers, from 40 to 5 GHz, are made using three static CMOS current-mode logic (CML) Master-Slave D-type Flip-Flop stages. The whole divider factor is 2048. A CMOS toggle flip-flop architecture working at 5 GHz was adopted for low frequency dividers. The power dissipation of the VCO core and frequency divider chain are 18 and 27.8 mW from 1.8 and 1 V supply voltages, respectively. Circuit functionality and performance were proved at three junction temperatures (i.e., −40, 25, and 125 °C) using a thermal chamber. Full article
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