Special Issue "Blended Learning: A Global Perspective"

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Anthony G. Picciano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
City University of New York Graduate Center and Hunter College, 365 Fifth Ave., NYC, New York, NY 10016, USA
Interests: school leadership; education policy; online teaching and learning; data-driven decision making; multimedia instructional models

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

It is with great pleasure that Education Sciences calls for the submission of articles for its special issue focusing on Blended Learning: A Global Perspective. Blended learning, also called hybrid and mixed-mode learning, combines online activity with traditional face-to-face pedagogical practice to create integrated “blended” learning environments. Blended learning has exploded as the learning modality of choice among educators around the world. Teachers, administrators, and policymakers in schools, colleges, universities, governing boards, and ministries are exploring the possibilities of blended learning as a pedagogically sound and beneficial way of broadening access to an education.

Blended learning is a natural outgrowth of the ubiquity of the Internet and World Wide Web. Over the past 20 years, online technology has touched just about every aspect of human endeavor, including education. With its increased popularity, a body of scholarship on blended learning has evolved. There is, however, much research, study, and knowledge-seeking still to be done. Technology is never static. As educators and entrepreneurs develop new hardware, software, and electronic communications capabilities, blended learning is constantly changing and making for a dynamic focus of study.

For this special issue, authors and researchers are invited to submit research articles, comprehensive reviews, policy studies, and other scholarly formats that will add to the knowledge base on blended learning. All research paradigms and methodologies are of interest. Submissions will go through a rigorous peer-review process to insure that the highest quality scholarship will comprise this special issue.

Prof. Dr. Anthony G. Picciano
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • blended learning
  • hybrid learning
  • mixed-mode learning
  • online learning
  • computer-mediated learning
  • instructional technology
  • instructional design

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
A Blended Learning Approach to the Teaching of Professional Practice in Architecture
Educ. Sci. 2015, 5(2), 166-178; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci5020166 - 29 May 2015
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2550
Abstract
This paper reports on a number of blended learning activities conducted in two subjects of a Master of Architecture degree at a major Australian university. The subjects were related to “professional practice” and as such represent a little researched area of architectural curriculum. [...] Read more.
This paper reports on a number of blended learning activities conducted in two subjects of a Master of Architecture degree at a major Australian university. The subjects were related to “professional practice” and as such represent a little researched area of architectural curriculum. The research provides some insight into the student perceptions of learning opportunity and engagement associated with on-line delivery modes. Students from these two subjects were surveyed for their perceptions about the opportunity for learning afforded by the on-line components, and also for their perceived level of engagement. Responses to these perceptions of traditional and on-line modes of delivery are compared and analysed for significant differences. While students were generally positive in response to the learning experiences, analysis of the results shows that students found the traditional modes to assist in their learning significantly more than on-line modes. Students were neutral regarding the opportunity for engagement that on-line modes provided. Analysis of the students’ gender, age and hours of paid work was also conducted to ascertain any relationship with attitudes to the flexibility of on-line delivery; no significant relationship was detected. This study has shown that students were generally resistant to on-line engagement opportunities and their ability to support learning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Blended Learning: A Global Perspective)
Article
A Blended Learning Approach to Teaching Project Management: A Model for Active Participation and Involvement: Insights from Norway
Educ. Sci. 2015, 5(2), 104-125; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci5020104 - 16 Apr 2015
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 4189
Abstract
The paper demonstrates and evaluates the effectiveness of a blended learning approach to create a meaningful learning environment. We use the term blended learning approach in this paper to refer to the use of multiple or hybrid instructional methods that emphasize the role [...] Read more.
The paper demonstrates and evaluates the effectiveness of a blended learning approach to create a meaningful learning environment. We use the term blended learning approach in this paper to refer to the use of multiple or hybrid instructional methods that emphasize the role of learners as contributors to the learning process rather than recipients of learning. Contribution to learning is attained by using in class gaming as pathways that ensure active involvement of learners. Using a blended learning approach is important in order to be able to address different learning styles of the target group. The approach was also important in order to be able to demonstrate different types of challenges, issues and competences needed in project management. Student evaluations of the course confirmed that the use of multiple learning methods and, in particular, in class gaming was beneficial and contributed to a meaningful learning experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Blended Learning: A Global Perspective)
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Article
Reflections on the Use of Iterative, Agile and Collaborative Approaches for Blended Flipped Learning Development
Educ. Sci. 2015, 5(2), 85-103; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci5020085 - 10 Apr 2015
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3194
Abstract
E-learning experiences are widely becoming common practice in many schools, tertiary institutions and other organisations. However despite this increased use of technology to enhance learning and the associated investment involved the result does not always equate to more engaged, knowledgeable and skilled learners. [...] Read more.
E-learning experiences are widely becoming common practice in many schools, tertiary institutions and other organisations. However despite this increased use of technology to enhance learning and the associated investment involved the result does not always equate to more engaged, knowledgeable and skilled learners. We have observed two key prevalences. The first is an ingrained, and often unquestioned, set of beliefs and expectations held by the majority of people who have experienced formal education, and who are involved in the development of eLearning and blended learning experiences. These beliefs tend to impact the overall design of what a blended type of learning experience might consist of. The second prevalence is for educational institutions to embark on large-scale eLearning developments, which by their scale can prove problematic. In part because it is a long time before the school or organisation sees any benefit and there is an up-front cost before any learning value is realised. In this paper we will be discussing our experiences of the implementation of a large-scale blended-learning project at Unitec, a tertiary institution in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Approaches taken to implement the development were iterative and based on a phased rollout, with each subsequent stage being informed by the ones before it. Our discussion draws on personal reflections associated with three different perspectives and a variety of roles during the three initial phases of the change making process. Our overall aim is to share our contextualised experiences, to add to the knowledge base on blended learning, and to provide some general, practical recommendations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Blended Learning: A Global Perspective)
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Article
Student Engagement and Blended Learning: Making the Assessment Connection
Educ. Sci. 2014, 4(4), 247-264; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci4040247 - 27 Nov 2014
Cited by 43 | Viewed by 8456
Abstract
There is an increased focus on student engagement and blended approaches to learning in higher education. This article demonstrates how collaborative learning applications and a blended approach to learning can be used to design and support assessment activities that increase levels of student [...] Read more.
There is an increased focus on student engagement and blended approaches to learning in higher education. This article demonstrates how collaborative learning applications and a blended approach to learning can be used to design and support assessment activities that increase levels of student engagement with course concepts, their peers, faculty and external experts, leading to increased student success and satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Blended Learning: A Global Perspective)
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