STEM Education as a Pathway to Achieve Equity: Underlying Challenges and Future Opportunities

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "STEM Education".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 1918

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UCLA School of Education and Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
Interests: equity-centered STEM teaching and learning; STEM research-practice partnerships; STEM curricular design; K-14 organizational contexts for STEM teaching and learning; technology adoption and adaptation in K-12 contexts

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
UCLA School of Education and Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
Interests: collaborative research and development focused on high-leverage problems associated with the day-to-day work of teaching and learning in educational institutions; urban education practice; the uses of classroom technology to promote learning; and support community formation; networked-based improvement science in education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are seeking contributions to a Special Issue on STEM, as a means to, and scaffolding for, fairness and justice in K-12 schooling. The specific theme is the manner in which equity can be accomplished through STEM in schooling enterprises across the world. Equity is realized and contested differently because of history, local and national politics, and social contexts. How does STEM innovation and intervention enter this swirl of variation to meet the intellectual and social needs of those who have, far too often, been un-and-underrepresented, or programmatically unidentified or excluded in K-12 schooling? This Special Issue embraces the fact that variation is the true normative in our world.

The Special Issue, therefore, seeks global perspectives on how justice and fairness might be buttressed through STEM. As a practical matter, globally, STEM is being used as a vehicle for educational and economic improvement. STEM, therefore is occupying more of the daily agenda of schooling. What, if anything, does this use of STEM mean for justice and fairness? We invite manuscripts that explore the intersection of STEM and justice, for example, by asking “Do STEM innovations offer the opportunity to gain new insights into historical oppression of minoritized peoples, exclusion because of immigration status, and the lost rights of original peoples?” The aim of this special issue is to illuminate potential positives and challenging connections between STEM and justice. Pragmatically, we seek papers that explore the potential of STEM innovations to become a vehicle for responding to overarching issues of fairness and justice. All submissions should represent approaches in which STEM equity is at the ideological, pragmatic, and practical center.

Potential topics may include:

  • The role of social partnerships in promoting equitable opportunities in K-12 STEM teaching and learning.
  • The role of STEM in promoting diversity and inclusion.
  • The role of current STEM practices/policies in empowering or marginalizing learners to select post-secondary STEM educational pathways.
  • The role of STEM teaching and learning in making the consequences of a history of oppression more visible.
  • The innovations and designs that accelerate immigrants and newcomers into productive STEM engagement.
  • Design and implementation techniques that keep diverse perspectives, languages, and experiences in view, while allowing students to explore rigorous curricular agenda in STEM.

Prof. Dr. Kimberley Gomez
Prof. Dr. Louis M. Gomez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • STEM and justice
  • implementation in STEM
  • STEM community partnerships
  • K-12 STEM teaching and learning
  • equity in STEM innovations

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

17 pages, 1508 KiB  
Article
Centering Educators’ Voices in the Development of Professional Learning for Data-Rich, Place-Based Science Instruction
by Nicole Wong, Rasha Elsayed, Katy Nilsen, Leticia R. Perez and Kirsten R. Daehler
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(4), 356; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14040356 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 683
Abstract
This self-reflective case study describes our project team’s efforts to promote equity in science professional learning (PL) by centering the voices of educators in the PL design process and within the course itself. We believe that educators’ experiences, priorities, and expertise are essential [...] Read more.
This self-reflective case study describes our project team’s efforts to promote equity in science professional learning (PL) by centering the voices of educators in the PL design process and within the course itself. We believe that educators’ experiences, priorities, and expertise are essential to developing professional learning that meets the needs of teachers and their students. We have a particular interest in amplifying the voices of those in historically underrepresented communities. Toward that end, we engaged science educators who work with Indigenous students and recent immigrants as collaborators in developing PL to support data-rich, place-based Earth Science instruction. In this case study, we share and critique the practices and tools that we have employed to center educator voices, rather than those of the PL designers and researchers. Our strategies for developing more equitable science professional learning include the use of: (a) equity-focused research methods, such as asset-based needs-sensing questions and peer-to-peer interviews; (b) a humanistic stance toward data-rich science learning, which emphasizes the typically unnamed sociocultural inputs and outputs that permeate all aspects of data; (c) a participatory design process that centers educators’ voices; and (d) a model of professional learning that uses representations of educator and student experiences as objects for reflection. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

16 pages, 263 KiB  
Review
Of Microscopes and Meeting Places: A Literature Review Examining Barriers to Indigenous Participation in STEM
by Madeline Bollinger and Brian M. McSkimming
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14020145 - 31 Jan 2024
Viewed by 724
Abstract
STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) was once not seen as a place for everyone. In fact, a powerful majority of people believed that individuals had to have predetermined characteristics that made them able to bear such vast and liberating knowledge. Centuries later, [...] Read more.
STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) was once not seen as a place for everyone. In fact, a powerful majority of people believed that individuals had to have predetermined characteristics that made them able to bear such vast and liberating knowledge. Centuries later, concentrated efforts are still needed to reverse the damage that the prevalence of such an ideology caused. When one considers the exclusion of individuals from a particular field, they may only see one side of the story; they may think that the only factor stopping the out-group from participating is the in-group trying to keep them out. The bigger picture tells the story of the consequences of enduring exclusion of the out-group, even well after explicit exclusionary tactics cease to exist. The awareness and study of this phenomenon in regard to several groups of historically excluded people have expanded in the modern era, helping to reduce its lasting effects. Some groups continue to participate in STEM at a much lower rate than their peers. Native Americans are a particularly interesting example of this. This review will explore some of the various reasons posed for the way and rate at which Native Americans are involved in STEM education and will attempt to determine the prevalence of each explanation and their interactions with each other. Full article
Back to TopTop