Advances in Education and Training for Disaster Risk Reduction and Management

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 17827

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Computer Science & Engineering, European University Cyprus, Engomi, Nicosia 1516, Cyprus
2. Centre of Excellence in Risk and Decision Sciences (CERIDES)
Interests: disaster management; decision support systems; occupational health &safety; engineering education; interdisciplinary research
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Education Sciences, European University Cyprus, Engomi, Nicosia 1516, Cyprus
Interests: statistics education; data science education; AI in education; STEM/STEAM education; teacher professional development
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CERIDES – Excellence in Innovation and Technology, European University Cyprus, 2404 Nicosia, Cyprus
Interests: risk assessment; safety management in micro firms; societal safety
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre of Excellence in Risk and Decision Sciences (CERIDES), Engomi, Nicosia 1516, Cyprus
Interests: emergency logistics; civil protection exercises and training; decision support systems; disaster risk reduction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically highlighted the fact that disasters can still severely disrupt the operation of technologically enhanced societies, resulting in millions of casualties and instigating short- and long-term adverse effects in the livelihoods of billions of citizens around the world. It is certainly evident that the way humanity studies and manages natural, anthropogenic, and hybrid disasters has progressed impressively since Prince’s pioneering examination, exactly a century ago, of the sociological aspects of the explosion of a French munition vessel. Disaster research, as a social sciences discipline, evolved slowly at first but gained significant momentum after the Second World War. Around the same time, the seeds of modern civil protection mechanisms were laid with the introduction of civil defense statutes in various countries. During the last 60 years, research on the definition and dimensions of disaster has allowed us to gain a much better understanding of disaster as a social phenomenon; societies no longer limit their focus on their disaster-response capabilities but view disaster (and disaster risk in particular) within the context of a comprehensive disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) framework. The Hyogo Framework for Action 2005–2015 and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030 have formalized this framework and have allowed its operationalization on national, regional, and global levels.

Education and training activities constitute an essential, but sometimes not adequately addressed, part in the implementation of an overall DRRM framework. The Sendai Framework emphasizes the importance of formal and non-formal education and training activities and fully integrates them within the implementation of the DRRM framework in a number of different ways: (1) as the basis for building knowledge and competencies among all stakeholders involved in the implementation of the Framework’s provisions; (2) as a fundamental mechanism for raising public awareness on the nature and implications of disaster risk and developing a corresponding prevention culture within societies; and (3) as the catalyst for enhancing the capacity of societal preparedness, response, and recovery mechanisms.

Despite the significant importance of educational and training activities for the implementation of a comprehensive DRRM framework, relatively few research studies have been published in this domain. This Special Issue of Education Sciences entitled “Advances in Education and Training for Disaster Risk Reduction and Management” aims to contribute toward the advancement of the conceptual understanding of educational and training considerations within the context of DRRM and the development of implementation aspects of educational and training interventions within the same context. As DRRM is an interdisciplinary domain, researchers from all scientific disciplines are invited to submit their contributions that critically discuss and analyze specific topics in this field. Such topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Use of pedagogical models, learning theories, and educational methodologies within the context of DRRM frameworks;
  • Development, testing, and evaluation of disaster-related curricula within the context of formal educational systems;
  • Development, testing, and evaluation of non-formal disaster-related educational and training activities;
  • Use of distance- and blended-learning educational modes within the context of DRRM frameworks;
  • Development, testing, and evaluation of drills, table-top exercises, and large-scale preparedness exercises;
  • Design, implementation, and evaluation of educational raising-awareness applications for disasters, as foreseen in the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030;
  • Identification of knowledge gaps within the context of DRRM frameworks;
  • Educational and training requirements, considerations, applications, and comparisons related to targeted UN Disaster Risk Reduction areas (earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, floods, biological hazards and pandemics, wildfires, coastal erosions, sea-level rises, natechs, and tropical cyclones) and special target groups such as immigrants, foreign communities, and people with disabilities and reduced mobility/autonomy.

For this Special Issue, we welcome original empirical studies demonstrating validated practical experiences on the topics considered, as well as conceptual essays contributing to theory and future research.

References:

Aiko Sakurai and Takeshi Sato (2016). Promoting education for disaster resilience and the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, Journal of Disaster Research, 11.

Akiyuki Kawasaki and Jakob Rhyner (2018). Investing in disaster risk reduction for resilience: roles of science, technology, and education. Journal of Disaster Research, 13.

Andi Subandi, Syahirul Alim, Fitri Haryanti, and Yayi S. Prabandari (2019). Training on modified model of programme for enhancement of emergency response flood preparedness based on the local wisdom of Jambi community. Jàmbá Journal of Disaster Risk Studies, 11.

Bandecchi, A.E., Pazzi, V., Morelli, S., Valori, L., and Casagli, N. (2019). Geo-hydrological and seismic risk awareness at school: emergency preparedness and risk perception evaluation. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 40. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijdrr.2019.101280

Baytiyeh, H. (2018). Can disaster risk education reduce the impacts of recurring disasters on developing societies? Education and Urban Society, 50(3), 230–245. https://doi.org/10.1177/0013124517713111

Boon, Helen J. and Pagliano, Paul J. (2014). Disaster education in Australian schools. Australian Journal of Environmental Education, 30 (2).

Salita, C., Liwanag, R., Tiongco, R.E., and Kawano, R. (2019). Development, implementation, and evaluation of a lay responder disaster training package among school teachers in Angeles City, Philippines: using Witte's behavioral model. Public Health, 170.

Coates, R. (2019). Educational hazards? The politics of disaster risk education in Rio de Janeiro. Disasters.

Da Hye Yeon, Ji Bum Chung, and Dong Hyeon Im (2020). The effects of earthquake experience on disaster education for children and teens. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17.

Edward H. Jasper, Gregory K. Wanner, Dale Berg, and Katherine Berg (2017). Implementing a disaster preparedness curriculum for medical students. Southern Medical Journal, 110.

Elena A. Skryabina, Naomi Betts, Gabriel Reedy, Paul Riley, and Richard Amlôt (2020). The role of emergency preparedness exercises in the response to a mass casualty terrorist incident: a mixed methods study. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 46.

Eunjoo Hong and Insook Lee (2018). Effectiveness of disaster training for community residents: a systematic review. Journal of the Korean Society of Hazard Mitigation, 18.

Forino, G. (Ed.), Bonati, S. (Ed.), Calandra, L. (Ed.). (2018). Governance of Risk, Hazards and Disasters. London: Routledge.

Gershon, MHS, DrPH, R., Kraus, MPH, MCP, L., Raveis, PhD, V., Sherman, PhD, M., and Kailes, MSW, J. (2013). Emergency preparedness in a sample of persons with disabilities. American Journal of Disaster Medicine, 8(1), 35–47.

Helen Sinclair, Emma E. Doyle, David M. Johnston, and Douglas Paton (2012). Assessing emergency management training and exercises. Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, 21.

James Ashcroft, Matthew H.V. Byrne, Peter A. Brennan, and Richard Justin Davies (2020). Preparing medical students for a pandemic: a systematic review of student disaster training programmes. Postgraduate Medical Journal.

Jason David Rivera and Demond Shondell Miller (2009). Disaster vulnerability education: a new focus on disaster education across the curriculum. Journal of Applied Security Research, 4.

Johnson, V., Ronan, K., Johnston, D., and Peace, R. (2014). Evaluations of disaster education programs for children: a methodological review. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, 9, 107–123.

Kailes, J.I. and Enders, A. (2007). Moving beyond “special needs”: a function-based framework for emergency management and planning. Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 17(4), 230–237.

Kaori Kitagawa (2015). Continuity and change in disaster education in Japan. History of Education, 44.

Koichi Shiwaku and Rajib Shaw (2008). Proactive co-learning: a new paradigm in disaster education. Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, 17.

Koichi Shiwaku, Rajib Shaw, Ram Chandra Kandel, Surya Narayan Shrestha, and Amod Mani Dixit (2007). Future perspective of school disaster education in Nepal. Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, 16.

Kristoffer Albris, Kristian Cedervall Lauta, and Emmanuel Raju (2020). Disaster knowledge gaps: exploring the interface between science and policy for disaster risk reduction in Europe. International Journal of Disaster Risk Science, 11.

Leif Inge Magnussen, Eric Carlstrøm, Jarle Løwe Sørensen, Glenn Egil Torgersen, Erlend Fritjof Hagenes, and Elsa Kristiansen (2018). Learning and usefulness stemming from collaboration in a maritime crisis management exercise in Northern Norway. Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, 27.

Marcos Barreto de Mendonca and Adriana Sobreira Valois (2017). Disaster education for landslide risk reduction: an experience in a public school in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Natural Hazards, 89.

Maria de Lourdes, Melo Zurita, Brian Cook, Dana C. Thomsen, Paul G. Munro, Timothy F. Smith, and John Gallina (2018). Living with disasters: social capital for disaster governance. Disasters, 42.

Meyer, M., Hendricks, M., Newman, G., Masterson, J., Cooper J., Sansom, G., Gharaibeh, N., Horney, J., Berke, P., van Zandt, S., and Cousins, T. (2018). Participatory action research: tools for disaster resilience education. International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, 9.

Neil Dufty (2014). Opportunities for disaster resilience learning in the Australian curriculum. Australian Journal of Emergency Management, 29.

Nifa, F.A.A., Abbas, S.R., Lin, C.K., and Othman, S.N. (2017). Developing a disaster education program for community safety and resilience: the preliminary phase. In: AIP Conference Proceedings (Vol. 1891). American Institute of Physics Inc.

Phillips B.D. (2015). Inclusive emergency management for people with disabilities facing disaster. In: Kelman I., Stough L.M. (eds) Disability and Disaster. Disaster Studies. Palgrave Macmillan, London.

Poljansek, K., Marin Ferrer, M., De Groeve, T., and Clark, I. (2017). Science for disaster risk management 2017: knowing better and losing less.

Rajib Shaw, Yukiko Takeuchi, Qi Ru Gwee, and Koichi Shiwaku (2011). Disaster education: an introduction. Community, Environment and Disaster Risk Management, 7.

Sasmita Mishra and Damodar Suar (2012). Effects of anxiety, disaster education, and resources on disaster preparedness behavior. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 42.

Takuya Iwahori, Katsuya Yamori, Takumi Miyamoto, Hideyuki Shiroshita, and Yoshihisa Iio (2017). Disaster education based on legitimate peripheral participation theory: a new model of disaster science communication. Journal of Natural Disaster Science, 38.

UNISDR (United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction) (2015). Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015–2030. Geneva: United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction.

UNISDR (United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction) (2009). Terminology on Disaster Risk Reduction. Geneva: United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction. https://www.unisdr.org/files/7817_UNISDRTerminologyEnglish.pdf. Accessed 21 Jan 2019.

United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) and United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) (2012). Disaster Risk Reduction in School Curricula: Case Studies from Thirty Countries. Geneva, Switzerland. United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) and United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Bangkok (2007). Natural Disaster Preparedness and Education for Sustainable Development. Bangkok, Thailand. United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Bangkok.

United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) (2015). Making Development Sustainable: The Future of Disaster Risk Management. Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction. Geneva, Switzerland: United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR).

Victoria A. Johnson, Kevin R. Ronan, David M. Johnston, and Robin Peace (2016). Improving the impact and implementation of disaster education: programs for children through theory-based evaluation. Risk Analysis, 36.

Wonyong Park (2020). Beyond the ‘two cultures’ in the teaching of disaster: or how disaster education and science education could benefit each other. Educational Philosophy and Theory, 52.

Yasamin O. Izadkhah and Mahmood Hosseini (2005). Towards resilient communities in developing countries through education of children for disaster preparedness. International Journal of Emergency Management, 2.

Yibing Tan, Xiaolan Liao, Haihao Su, Chun Li, Jiagen Xiang, and Zhaoyang Dong (2017). Disaster preparedness among university students in Guangzhou, China: assessment of status and demand for disaster education. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, 11.

Yozo Goto, Muzailin Affan, Agussabti, Yudha Nurdin, Diyah K. Yuliana, and Ardiansyah (2012). Tsunami evacuation simulation for disaster education and city planning. Journal of Disaster Research, 7.

Dr. Christos Dimopoulos
Prof. Dr. Maria Meletiou-Mavrotheris
Prof. George Boustras
Mr. Evangelos Katsaros
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Education/training in the context of the Sendai Framework
  • Education/training in disaster risk reduction and management
  • Education/training for raising public awareness of disaster risk
  • Development/testing/evaluation of formal disaster-related educational curricula
  • Development/testing/evaluation of non-formal disaster-related educational activities
  • Design/implementation/evaluation of disaster preparedness exercises
  • Knowledge gaps in disaster risk reduction and management
  • Education /training on Risk Assessment statistical and mathematical models for disaster risk reduction and management
  • Education/training for tsunami disaster risk reduction and management
  • Education/training for landslide disaster risk reduction and management
  • Education/training for flood disaster risk reduction and management
  • Education/training for biological hazard/pandemic disaster risk reduction and management
  • Education/training for wildfire disaster risk reduction and management
  • Education/training for coastal erosion disaster risk reduction and management
  • Education/training for sea-level rise disaster risk reduction and management
  • Education/training for natech disaster risk reduction and management
  • Education/training for tropical cyclone disaster risk reduction and management
  • Education/training for people with disabilities and reduced mobility/autonomy in the context of disaster risk reduction and management
  • Educational/training for immigrants and foreign communities in a country in the context of disaster risk reduction and management.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 1229 KiB  
Article
What Are We Teaching Engineers about Climate Change? Presenting the MACC Evaluation of Climate Change Education
by Panagiota Axelithioti, Rachel S. Fisher, Emma J. S. Ferranti, Holly J. Foss and Andrew D. Quinn
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(2), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13020153 - 1 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2383
Abstract
Engineering underpins the progress of modern societies. However, engineering activities are a key driver of climate change and engineers are responsible in many ways for disaster risk reduction. It is therefore imperative that engineering education accurately portrays the impact that the profession has [...] Read more.
Engineering underpins the progress of modern societies. However, engineering activities are a key driver of climate change and engineers are responsible in many ways for disaster risk reduction. It is therefore imperative that engineering education accurately portrays the impact that the profession has on our climate and equips engineers with the knowledge to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and to adapt infrastructure for climate resilience. Here, we explore how higher education prepares engineers to address the climate crisis via a curricula analysis of three departments (mechanical, civil, and electrical engineering). The pilot study investigated the extent of mitigation and adaptation to climate change (MACC) content across different disciplines by developing and applying an evaluation methodology. We found that module descriptions and learning objectives were largely without reference to MACC, further evidencing the dissociation of engineering education from the climate reality as cited in the literature. This novel approach goes beyond curricula analysis to integrate MACC within module outlines paving the way for future integration. This research demonstrates the urgent need for climate conscious engineering curricula. Full article
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19 pages, 2377 KiB  
Article
Arching from Function to Form—Important Design Elements of Simulation Exercises (SimEx) in Emergency Response and Disaster Risk Management
by Andra Iustina Covaciu, Marcus Abrahamsson, Albrecht Beck, Shivani Rai, Niroj Sapkota, Mark Shapiro and Joerg Szarzynski
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(11), 718; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11110718 - 9 Nov 2021
Viewed by 3249
Abstract
With Rasmussen’s abstraction hierarchy as starting point, the present article focuses on understanding some of the aspects guiding the development of a simulation exercise (SimEx) from a multi-faceted perspective, based on interviews and post-exercise evaluations conducted with both exercise designers and participants. The [...] Read more.
With Rasmussen’s abstraction hierarchy as starting point, the present article focuses on understanding some of the aspects guiding the development of a simulation exercise (SimEx) from a multi-faceted perspective, based on interviews and post-exercise evaluations conducted with both exercise designers and participants. The results show that, in order to achieve its overarching objective, an exercise must fulfill a wide range of “functions”, which in turn can take various kinds of “forms” or actual representations in the physical world. The paper discusses a number of identified required functions of a SimEx, sometimes labeled as design elements, and furthermore elaborates on differences and specific requirements at form level, e.g., virtual vs. physical exercises. Full article
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17 pages, 459 KiB  
Article
Social Media Tools for Educational Sustainability in Conflict-Affected Regions
by Hoda Baytiyeh
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(11), 662; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11110662 - 20 Oct 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2527
Abstract
This conceptual paper demonstrates the potential role of social media in providing students with access to education during emergency situations when schools cannot ensure students’ safety or provide safe learning environments. It is based on conceptual analysis that transforms face-to-face education into a [...] Read more.
This conceptual paper demonstrates the potential role of social media in providing students with access to education during emergency situations when schools cannot ensure students’ safety or provide safe learning environments. It is based on conceptual analysis that transforms face-to-face education into a cost-free, online educational environment by relying on social-media learning tools during short-term disruptions caused by violence and conflict. This article proposes a framework that outlines how technology can be used to maintain education in schools during conflicts and emergency situations: cloud computing to access administrative resources and social media tools to maintain teaching/learning resources and student–teacher as well as student–student interactions. The proposed strategy could be greatly beneficial to educational leaders and administrators in regions vulnerable to sectarian conflicts where student safety and the delivery of educational services can become major challenges. This paper contributes to the literature by emphasising the advantages of social media tools for educational delivery in conflict-afflicted regions. Full article
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13 pages, 4052 KiB  
Article
Emergency Teaching–Learning Methods (ETLM) during COVID-19: Lessons Learned from Sri Lanka
by Ruchira Gangahagedara, Muditha Karunarathna, Wasantha Athukorala, Shyamantha Subasinghe and Prabath Ekanayake
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(10), 579; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11100579 - 24 Sep 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3983
Abstract
Sri Lanka’s education system was suddenly shifted from classroom-based free education to online-based distance learning as an emergency teaching and learning method (ETLM) in response to the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. This study examines how various stakeholders used online-based distant learning as an ETLM, [...] Read more.
Sri Lanka’s education system was suddenly shifted from classroom-based free education to online-based distance learning as an emergency teaching and learning method (ETLM) in response to the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. This study examines how various stakeholders used online-based distant learning as an ETLM, and highlights the lessons learned from such a transition in Sri Lanka through a case study of the Kandy education zone (KEZ), in response to the country’s COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. We obtained the data through a questionnaire survey from 19 schools in KEZ, selecting the teachers, students, and parents as a survey sample. The findings revealed that nearly 64.7% of teachers used social media for the teaching–learning process (TLP), 27.9% used standard online teaching platforms, and only 7.4% used traditional teaching methods during the pandemic lockdown. Additionally, 36.5% of teachers and 41.2% of students favored the WhatsApp mobile application for the TLP, while others preferred other applications. However, during the COVID-19 lockdown, most of the less privileged schools in the peripheral areas of the KEZ adopted traditional teaching methods (TTM). The extent of the gap in ETLM adaptation and the driving factors that led to observable discrepancies between privileged and non-privileged schools, even in the urban settings of the KEZ, are also discussed in this study. These findings are significant in terms of educational policy making and management. Overall, this research contributes to understanding the ETLM adaptation of the KEZ by proposing policy directions that policymakers and other higher education authorities in the country should consider in an emergency. Full article
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15 pages, 217 KiB  
Article
Conceptualising ‘Disaster Education’
by Kaori Kitagawa
Educ. Sci. 2021, 11(5), 233; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci11050233 - 14 May 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3812
Abstract
‘Disaster education’ has been studied in various disciplines such as disaster risk management and environmental studies. However, disaster education is a relatively ‘new enquiry’ in the field of education. Particularly, the literature that conceptualises ‘disaster education’ in education is minimal. This paper aims [...] Read more.
‘Disaster education’ has been studied in various disciplines such as disaster risk management and environmental studies. However, disaster education is a relatively ‘new enquiry’ in the field of education. Particularly, the literature that conceptualises ‘disaster education’ in education is minimal. This paper aims to fill this gap by synthesising existing disaster education literature linking them with educational concepts. The paper suggests three possible conceptualisations for disaster education. The first is based on a temporal distinction between education undertaken in usual times or unusual times. The second conceptualisation applies modes of learning and teaching: formal, non-formal and informal. Thirdly, establishing disaster education as a sub-discipline in the field of education is proposed: one sub-discipline is lifelong learning and the other is public pedagogy. Critiquing each method of conceptualisation, the paper argues for the suitability and usefulness of locating ‘disaster education’ within public pedagogy. Full article
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