Teacher Education for Islamic Education and Schooling

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2024 | Viewed by 2010

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Islamic Thought and Education (CITE), School of Education, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
Interests: teacher education; equity; inclusion; culturally responsive pedagogies; Islamic education/schooling/pedagogy; faith-based pedagogies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Islamic Thought and Education (CITE), School of Education, University of Southern Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
Interests: Islamic studies; sociology; psychology; public health and health services; religion and religious studies; communication and media studies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The blossoming field of Islamic education studies (Sahin 2019) is increasingly drawing research attention on the realities and opportunities of Islamic K-12 schools, Islamic religious education in state-funded schools, conceptual understandings of education in the Islamic tradition, and approaches to learning in informal sites of education for Muslim children globally. However, in support of the growth and development of formal and informal sites of Islamic education and schooling, there is also a blossoming sector of teacher education. 

Over the past decade in particular, several accredited university-level teacher education programs have been established across Western contexts. The University of South Australia (Australia), home to the co-editors of this Special Issue, established a Graduate Certificate in Education (Islamic Education) in 2017. Both Bayan College (USA) and Markfield Institute of Higher Education (UK) offer a M.A. in Islamic Education. The University of Vienna, along with numerous other European universities, offer a Master’s program in Islamic Religious Education (IRE). In addition to accredited programs, there are a plethora of professional learning opportunities emerging for educators in Islamic school settings. Summer institutes, online short programs, conferences, and professional learning communities all contribute toward the array of opportunities available.

This Special Issue focuses on the conceptualization, development, implementation, and impact of teacher education programs for educators in Islamic schools and educators who teach Islamic religious education.

We invite both conceptual and empirical contributions. Conceptually, we are interested in papers that grapple with understandings of education in the Islamic tradition in relation to contemporary educational thought that informs teacher education programs. Empirically, we invite contributions related to the development, implementation, and impact of existing teacher education initiatives (including non-accredited informal professional learning).

In this Special Issue, research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Program design and/or conceptualisation of distinct islamically informed teacher education
  • Professional dilemmas in program design or facilitation
  • Professional dilemmas for educator enactment
  • Program accreditation within secular higher education  
  • Novel approaches to teacher education grounded in Islamic education theory
  • Fostering Islamic conceptions of reflection, critical, and reflexive thinking
  • Educator enactments of professional learning
  • Educator efficacy, agency, and/or personas

The editors particularly welcome responses where the research has been undertaken in a co-participatory manner with key stakeholders (e.g., educators in the field) involved in the process.

We look forward to receiving your submission.

Dr. Nadeem Memon
Prof. Dr. Mohamad Abdalla
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • Islamic/Muslim education
  • Islamic/Muslim schooling
  • Islamic pedagogy
  • reflective practice
  • professional learning communities
  • teacher education

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

14 pages, 278 KiB  
Article
Experiences of Anti-Blackness in Islamic Educational Spaces: Implications for Islamic Teacher Education
by Shyla González-Doğan
Educ. Sci. 2023, 13(11), 1160; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci13111160 - 20 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1314
Abstract
This paper is an initial examination of anti-Blackness within a specifically Muslim context, and it presents the experiences of some Black community members who attended one U.S. city’s primary local mosque’s weekend school program and who either attended or had children who attended [...] Read more.
This paper is an initial examination of anti-Blackness within a specifically Muslim context, and it presents the experiences of some Black community members who attended one U.S. city’s primary local mosque’s weekend school program and who either attended or had children who attended the city’s sole Islamic school. During this ethnographic project, 18 participants who identified as part of the Muslim community of the city were interviewed; semi-structured interviews and snowball sampling were used to obtain data. Research participants included parents of children in the Islamic school or weekend school program at the affiliated mosque, former students of the Islamic school or the mosque’s weekend school program, and former or current leaders in the community. The findings demonstrate that anti-Blackness in Islamic community spaces often manifests through the targeting of Black children for perceived misbehavior in educational spaces and through practices of exclusion toward Black community members. The findings also indicate that there is a need for increased education and training related to anti-Blackness and a need for the implementation of an anti-racist pedagogy in Islamic educational settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Teacher Education for Islamic Education and Schooling)
Back to TopTop