Special Issue "Genetic Diversity of Soil Bacterial Communities"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Diversity and Culture Collections".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Carmine Crecchio
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy
Interests: soil microbial diversity; soil fertility; metagenomics of soil bacteria communities; plant growth promoting bacteria; biofertilizers
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soil is an important natural resource and has a key role in the biosphere, as most of the carbon and nutrient fluxes occur in the top 10 cm of the soil profile; it is a species-rich habitat that provides support for plant growth and health and, consequently, affects human activities. Although broadly homogeneous in the landscape, soil is extremely heterogeneous on a microbial scale. In fact, soil supports taxonomic and physiologic microbial diversity, which is regarded as more extensive than that of any other group of organisms and considered vitally important to the maintenance and sustainability of the biosphere.

Looking within the “black box”, as soil has been regarded in the last decades; overcoming its inaccessibility; and understanding its microbial composition and functioning, are challenges for scientists. In particular, if it is important to investigate the genetic diversity of microbial populations, it is also fundamental to understand the link between the major functions of microbial biomass and its species composition.

As Guest Editor for a Special Issue entitled "Genetic Diversity of Soil Bacterial Communities" to be published in the journal Diversity, I invite you to submit research articles, review articles, or short communications. Papers should address all the relevant and unclear aspects of the composition and functioning of bacterial communities, in agricultural and natural soil, in field trials, in laboratory-scale experiments, in rich or marginal soils, at different latitudes, and under different types of management.

Dr. Carmine Crecchio
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Soil bacterial diversity
  • Soil fertility
  • Metagenomics of soil bacteria communities

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Nitrogen Fixing and Phosphate Mineralizing Bacterial Communities in Sweet Potato Rhizosphere Show a Genotype-Dependent Distribution
Diversity 2019, 11(12), 231; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11120231 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
We hypothesize that sweet potato genotypes can influence the bacterial communities related to phosphate mineralization and nitrogen fixation in the rhizosphere. Tuberous roots of field-grown sweet potato from genotypes IPB-149, IPB-052, and IPB-137 were sampled three and six months after planting. The total [...] Read more.
We hypothesize that sweet potato genotypes can influence the bacterial communities related to phosphate mineralization and nitrogen fixation in the rhizosphere. Tuberous roots of field-grown sweet potato from genotypes IPB-149, IPB-052, and IPB-137 were sampled three and six months after planting. The total community DNA was extracted from the rhizosphere and analyzed by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), based on the alkaline phosphatase coding gene (alp gene) and on the nitrogenase coding gene (nifH gene). The cluster analysis based on DGGE showed that plant age slightly influenced the bacterial community related to phosphate mineralization in the rhizosphere of IPB-137, although it did not affect the bacterial community related to nitrogen fixation. The statistical analysis of DGGE fingerprints (Permutation test, p ≤ 0.05) showed that nitrogen-fixing bacterial community of IPB-052 statistically differed from genotypes IPB-149 and IPB-137 after six months of planting. The bacterial community of IPB-137 rhizosphere analyzed by alp gene also showed significant differences when compared to IPB-149 in both sampling times (p ≤ 0.05). In addition, alp gene copy numbers significantly increased in abundance in the rhizosphere of IPB-137 after six months of planting. Therefore, plant genotype should be considered in the biofertilization of sweet potato. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetic Diversity of Soil Bacterial Communities)
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Open AccessArticle
Soil Biological Fertility and Bacterial Community Response to Land Use Intensity: A Case Study in the Mediterranean Area
Diversity 2019, 11(11), 211; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11110211 - 10 Nov 2019
Abstract
The current study was performed to investigate the effects of three different long-term land use intensities on adjacent soil plots, namely a winter wheat field, a grass-covered vineyard, and a cherry farm, on soil biochemical, microbial, and molecular parameters. The results showed the [...] Read more.
The current study was performed to investigate the effects of three different long-term land use intensities on adjacent soil plots, namely a winter wheat field, a grass-covered vineyard, and a cherry farm, on soil biochemical, microbial, and molecular parameters. The results showed the maximum content of soil organic matter (SOM) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) observed in the grass-covered vineyard. Basal respiration (BSR) and the cumulated respiration (CSR) after 25 days of incubation were significantly higher in the grass-covered vineyard and cherry farm, respectively (BSR 11.84 mg CO2–C kg−1 soil d−1, CSR 226.90 mg CO2–C kg−1 soil). Grass-covered vineyard showed the highest soil biological fertility index (BFI) score (20) and ranked in the class IV (good) of soil biological fertility. Cereal field and cherry farm had lower BFI scores and the corresponding BFI class was III (medium). In addition, the maximum ribosomal RNA copy number and the highest abundance of oligotrophic bacterial groups (25.52% Actinobacteria, 3.45% Firmicutes, and 1.38% Acidobacteria) were observed in the grass-covered vineyard. In conclusion, the grass-covered vineyard is a more conservative system and could have a large potential to improve total carbon storage in soil, mainly because of the cover crop residue management and the low soil perturbation through the no-tillage system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetic Diversity of Soil Bacterial Communities)
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