Special Issue "Predators as Agents of Selection and Diversification"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mark C. Belk
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, United States
Interests: predator-prey interactions, life history evolution, native fish conservation, fisheries, parasites, burying beetles, fishes
Dr. Jerald B. Johnson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, United States
Interests: evolutionary ecology; speciation; life history evolution; phylogeography; behavioral ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Predators are important agents of selection in most natural systems. Our goals for this collection of papers are: 1) to explore the variety of traits, in both predator and prey, that result from predator/prey interactions, including coevolved suites of traits; 2) to explore how selection via predation acts through both direct and indirect effects of predators; and 3) to explore the linkages between selection from predation and diversity at multiple scales. We invite papers that address any of these areas either in review, or as empirical case studies. Papers that present a strictly ecological analysis of predation would not fit within this scope.

Dr. Mark C. Belk
Dr. Jerald B. Johnson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Predation;
  • Evolutionary effects;
  • Selection;
  • Diversification;
  • Coevolution;
  • Direct and indirect selective effects;
  • Adaptive trait variation;
  • Antipredator adaptations;
  • Evolutionary arms race

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Crypsis Decreases with Elevation in a Lizard
Diversity 2019, 11(12), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11120236 - 07 Dec 2019
Abstract
Predation usually selects for visual crypsis, the colour matching between an animal and its background. Geographic co-variation between animal and background colourations is well known, but how crypsis varies along elevational gradients remains unknown. We predict that dorsal colouration in the lizard Psammodromus [...] Read more.
Predation usually selects for visual crypsis, the colour matching between an animal and its background. Geographic co-variation between animal and background colourations is well known, but how crypsis varies along elevational gradients remains unknown. We predict that dorsal colouration in the lizard Psammodromus algirus should covary with the colour of bare soil—where this lizard is mainly found—along a 2200 m elevational gradient in Sierra Nevada (SE Spain). Moreover, we predict that crypsis should decrease with elevation for two reasons: (1) Predation pressure typically decreases with elevation, and (2) at high elevation, dorsal colouration is under conflicting selection for both crypsis and thermoregulation. By means of standardised photographies of the substratum and colourimetric measurements of lizard dorsal skin, we tested the colour matching between lizard dorsum and background. We found that, along the gradient, lizard dorsal colouration covaried with the colouration of bare soil, but not with other background elements where the lizard is rarely detected. Moreover, supporting our prediction, the degree of crypsis against bare soil decreased with elevation. Hence, our findings suggest local adaptation for crypsis in this lizard along an elevational gradient, but this local adaptation would be hindered at high elevations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Predators as Agents of Selection and Diversification)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop