Special Issue "Taxonomy and Diversity of Aquaculture and Fisheries Parasites"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Microbial Diversity and Culture Collections".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Robin M. Overstreet
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Division of Coastal Sciences, Gulf Coast Research Laboratory, University of Southern Mississippi, Ocean Springs, MS 39564, USA
Interests: parasites and diseases; taxonomy; systematics; development and life histories; diagnoses and management of diseases; ecology; pathogenesis and host-parasite relationships; public health; protozoans; protists; digeneans; nematodes; myxosporans; coccidians; microsporans; and haplosporans; viral infections in shrimp, crabs and fish; microsporidian infections in wild animals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Parasites are superabundant, and depending on how one defines a “parasite”, they may constitute close to half the organisms on Earth. Species from the aquatic environment make up a large percentage of those, including internal and external kinds and those include viruses, bacteria, fungi, protists, different “protozoan” groups, platyhelminths, and non-platyhelminth metazoans. A large percentage of these infect and influence fisheries, including those constituting bony fishes, elasmobranchs, and shellfishes. In addition to the diverse nature of these parasitic groups, there is diversity among each kind of parasite. This diversity involving infections in fisheries remains poorly understood, partially because fewer than half the number of species have been described. Consequently, uncertainty of the relationship among the species exists. This Special Issue provides a venue to highlight new research that enhances our understanding regarding i) the identity, diversity and distribution of one or more parasitic groups; ii) the influence of such groups on fisheries in the wild or in aquaculture as it relates to health of the hosts or activities such as migration, feeding, separation of stocks, climatic or anthropogenic changes, and public health risk; and iii) the diversity components as they describe and discuss such features including host, size, prey kind, pathogenicity, susceptibility, resistance, physiology, climate, geography, history, mitigation, evolution of parasites or hosts, or the combination of any of those.

Prof. Robin M. Overstreet
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Phylogenetic Affinity of Genolopa (Digenea: Monorchiidae) with Descriptions of Two New Species
Diversity 2020, 12(2), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12020051 - 28 Jan 2020
Abstract
The validity of Genolopa Linton, 1910 has been controversial because the observation of presently recognized critical diagnostic morphological features (spines in the genital atrium and a bipartite, anteriorly spined terminal organ) were omitted from the original diagnosis, and these features were not universally [...] Read more.
The validity of Genolopa Linton, 1910 has been controversial because the observation of presently recognized critical diagnostic morphological features (spines in the genital atrium and a bipartite, anteriorly spined terminal organ) were omitted from the original diagnosis, and these features were not universally appreciated as important diagnostic features until 2008. Modern taxonomists have been further challenged by inappropriate fixation techniques that have resulted in various interpretations of morphological features. Consequently, named species in the genus have fluctuated among other monorchiid genera depending on various interpretations by taxonomists, and a modern consensus on classifying these species is lacking. This study combines a molecular approach with modern conventional morphological techniques to investigate the validity of Genolopa as a lineage within the Monorchiidae. New morphology and molecular sequence data from the type-species of Genolopa were studied, and two new species in the genus were described, Genolopa vesca n. sp. and Genolopa minuscula n. sp. Interrelationships among the Monorchiidae were explored using Bayesian inference analysis of the partial 28S rDNA fragment, incorporating three species of Genolopa for the first time. The phylogenetic analysis revealed that the genus represents a natural lineage, supporting the presence of spines in the genital atrium in conjunction with a bipartite and anteriorly spined terminal organ as key features of the generic diagnosis. This study also provides for the first time partial 28S rDNA data for Postmonorchis orthopristis, Lasiotocus trachinoti, Lasiotocus glebulentus, and an unidentified species of Lasiotocus. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Taxonomy and Diversity of Aquaculture and Fisheries Parasites)
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Open AccessArticle
Argulus from the Pascagoula River, MS, USA, with an Emphasis on Those of the Threatened Gulf Sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi
Diversity 2019, 11(12), 232; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11120232 - 05 Dec 2019
Abstract
Species of Argulus (Branchiura Thorell, 1864) are common ectoparasites of freshwater, estuarine, and marine fishes. Argulid identification and taxonomy is often confusing because many species are reported to parasitize multiple host species, have similar morphological characters, and come from various salinity regimes. Gulf [...] Read more.
Species of Argulus (Branchiura Thorell, 1864) are common ectoparasites of freshwater, estuarine, and marine fishes. Argulid identification and taxonomy is often confusing because many species are reported to parasitize multiple host species, have similar morphological characters, and come from various salinity regimes. Gulf sturgeon is an anadromous fish natal to drainages in the north-central Gulf of Mexico, and as with many endangered species, has a poorly documented parasite community. During Gulf sturgeon tagging and monitoring studies (2016–2019) in the Pascagoula River, MS, USA, species of Argulus were collected from Gulf sturgeon as well as other incidentally captured fishes. Argulus flavescens Wilson, 1916 was found on Gulf sturgeon and flathead catfish, Argulus americanus Wilson, 1902 on bowfin, and Argulus bicolor Bere, 1936 on Atlantic stingray. We provide morphological details and measurements for these species as well as the first confirmed 28S rDNA molecular data. Argulus flavescens was more abundant and prevalent on larger Gulf sturgeon and on sturgeon captured in freshwater rather than estuarine habitats. Our results indicate that A. flacescens may not tolerate estuarine salinities and that the anadromous life-history pattern of Gulf sturgeon could help rid them of A. flavescens when they emigrate from their riverine habitats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Taxonomy and Diversity of Aquaculture and Fisheries Parasites)
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Open AccessArticle
Dactylogyrids (Platyhelminthes: Monogenoidea) Infecting the Gill Lamellae of Flatheads (Scorpaeniformes: Platycephalidae), with Proposal of Platycephalotrema n. gen. and Descriptions of New Species from Australia and Japan
Diversity 2019, 11(8), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11080132 - 12 Aug 2019
Abstract
Platycephalotrema n. gen. (Dactylogyridae) is proposed for four new species and 5 previously described species parasitizing the gills of flatheads (Scorpaeniformes: Platycephalidae) as follows: Platycephalotrema ogawai n. sp. (type species) from Platycephalus sp. 1 (type host) and Platycephalus sp. 2, both of Nakabo [...] Read more.
Platycephalotrema n. gen. (Dactylogyridae) is proposed for four new species and 5 previously described species parasitizing the gills of flatheads (Scorpaeniformes: Platycephalidae) as follows: Platycephalotrema ogawai n. sp. (type species) from Platycephalus sp. 1 (type host) and Platycephalus sp. 2, both of Nakabo & Kai (2013) (locally known as “Yoshino-gochi” and “Ma-gochi,” respectively) (Japan); Platycephalotrema austrinum n. sp. from Platycephalus endrachtensis Quoy & Gaimard (type host) and Platycephalus sp. (Australia); Platycephalotrema bassensis (Hughes, 1928) n. comb. from Platycephalus bassensis Cuvier (Australia); Platycephalotrema koppa n. sp. from Platycephalus fuscus Cuvier (Australia); Platycephalotrema macassarensis (Yamaguti, 1963) n. comb. from Platycephalus indicus (Linnaeus) (China, Macassar); Platycephalotrema mastix n. sp. from P. fuscus and P. endrachtensis (Australia); Platycephalotrema platycephali (Yin & Sproston, 1948) n. comb. from P. indicus (China) and P. fuscus (Australia); Platycephalotrema sinensis (Yamaguti, 1963) n. comb. from Cociella punctata (Cuvier) (China); Platycephalotrema thysanophrydis (Yamaguti, 1937) n. comb. from Inegocia japonica (Cuvier), Inegocia ochiaii Imamura, and Cociella crocodilus (Cuvier) (Japan, China). Other species requiring further study but potentially members of Platycephalotrema include Ancyrocephalus vesiculosus Murray, 1931, Haliotrema indicum Tripathi, 1957, Haliotrema swatowensis Yao, Wang, Xia, & Chen, 1998, and Haliotrema pteroisi Paperna, 1972. The primary features differentiating Platycephalotrema include species having: (1) tandem gonads (testis postgermarial); (2) two prostatic reservoirs, each emptying independently into the base of the male copulatory organ; (3) a dextral vaginal pore and large vaginal vestibule; (4) dorsal and ventral pairs of morphologically similar anchors; (5) a ventral bar with spatulate ends; (6) a dorsal bar with bifurcated ends, and (7) absence of an accessory piece. The new species are described, and P. thysanophrydis is redescribed based on newly collected and museum specimens. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Taxonomy and Diversity of Aquaculture and Fisheries Parasites)
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Open AccessArticle
An Anomalous Phylogenetic Position for Deraiotrema platacis Machida, 1982 (Lepocreadiidae) from Platax pinnatus on the Great Barrier Reef
Diversity 2019, 11(7), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/d11070104 - 04 Jul 2019
Abstract
The monotypic genus Deraiotrema Machida, 1982 has only been reported once, from the orbicular batfish Platax orbicularis (Forsskål) in the waters around Palau in Micronesia (Machida, 1982). It has a body-shape similar to other lepocreadiids from batfishes, such as species of Bianium Stunkard, [...] Read more.
The monotypic genus Deraiotrema Machida, 1982 has only been reported once, from the orbicular batfish Platax orbicularis (Forsskål) in the waters around Palau in Micronesia (Machida, 1982). It has a body-shape similar to other lepocreadiids from batfishes, such as species of Bianium Stunkard, 1930 and Diploproctodaeum La Rue, 1926, but differs in having multiple testes in ventral and dorsal layers. Here we report Deraiotrema platacis Machida, 1982 for just the second time, infecting the dusky batfish Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus) from the waters off Lizard Island on the northern Great Barrier Reef. We present a molecular phylogenetic analysis of the position of this genus inferred from 28S rDNA sequences. Surprisingly, we find the species most closely related to Echeneidocoelium indicum despite the infection of completely unrelated hosts and the presence of two characters (lateral fold in the forebody and multiple testes) that are found elsewhere in the Lepocreadiidae. We conclude that homoplasy within the Lepocreadiidae is extensive and that morphology-based prediction of relationships has little prospect of success. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Taxonomy and Diversity of Aquaculture and Fisheries Parasites)
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