Special Issue "Community Assembly and Biological Invasions"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Jean H. Burns
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, United States
Interests: Invasive species, Phylogenetic Comparative Methods, Plant-soil interactions, population dynamics, community assembly

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biological invasions are a key problem of conservation concern as well as a study system for addressing basic questions about community assembly. This Special Issue highlights new research that addresses: (i) lessons from biological invasions about community assembly; (ii) the role of biotic and abiotic drivers in invasion dynamics; (iii) novel approaches for understanding mechanisms of invasion; and (iv) comparative studies or syntheses that address the role of evolutionary history in invasions.

Assoc.Prof. Jean H. Burns
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biological invasions
  • Community assembly
  • Biotic drivers
  • Abiotic drivers
  • Phylogeny
  • Darwin’s naturalization conundrum
  • Evolutionary history

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
Priority Treatment Leaves Grassland Restoration Vulnerable to Invasion
Diversity 2020, 12(2), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/d12020071 - 11 Feb 2020
Abstract
Priority effects can be used to promote target species during restoration. Early planting can provide an advantage over later-arriving species, increasing abundance of these early-arrivers in restored communities. However, we have limited knowledge of the indirect impacts of priority effects in restoration. In [...] Read more.
Priority effects can be used to promote target species during restoration. Early planting can provide an advantage over later-arriving species, increasing abundance of these early-arrivers in restored communities. However, we have limited knowledge of the indirect impacts of priority effects in restoration. In particular, we do not understand how priority effects impact non-target species. Of particular conservation concern is how these priority effects influence establishment by non-native species. We use a field-based mesocosm experiment to explore the impacts of priority effects on both target and non-target species in California grasslands. Specifically, we seeded native grasses and forbs, manipulating order of arrival by planting them at the same time, planting forbs one year before grasses, planting grasses one year before forbs, or planting each functional group alone. While our study plots were tilled and weeded for the first year, the regional species pool was heavily invaded. We found that, while early-arrival of native grasses did not promote establishment of non-native species, giving priority to native forbs ultimately left our restoration mesocosms vulnerable to invasion by non-native species. This suggests that, in some cases, establishment of non-native species may be an unintended consequence of using priority treatments as a restoration tool. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community Assembly and Biological Invasions)
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