Dynamics of Marine Communities

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Diversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 3589

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Korea Institute of Ocean Science and Technology, Geoje 53201, Republic of Korea
Interests: benthic-pelagic coupling; food web; stable isotope ecology; community structure
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In marine ecosystems, benthic and pelagic communities have continuously experienced changes in their species composition, dominant species, and species ecology according to various anthropogenic and environmental influences. If external influences such as climate change and human activities continue, biological communities form new communities through the process of succession, resulting in changes in available biological resources. Therefore, at this point, it is important to identify fluctuations in biological communities in the marine ecosystems and influences of environmental variables, and to predict future changes. In the absence of a baseline from which to compare past and future studies; however, it is impossible to effectively predict the impacts of humans and climate change on the community ecology of the marine habitats. The purpose of this Special Issue is to publish novel and high-quality research with respect to the subjects mentioned below and related ones.

  • Long- and/or short-term dynamics of marine communities;
  • Link environmental and/or anthropogenic influences to the changes in marine communities;
  • Geographical variations in the community structures and ecology of marine species;
  • The role of predators and parasites in marine communities;
  • The effect of species introductions on marine communities;
  • Marine communities and climate change.

Dr. Joo Myun Park
Guest Editor

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 3202 KiB  
Article
Effects of Freshwater Inflow during the Rainy Season on the Benthic Polychaete Community in the Geum River Estuary, South Korea
by Sang Lyeol Kim, Kyung-Hee Oh, Kongtae Ra and Ok Hwan Yu
Diversity 2024, 16(3), 180; https://doi.org/10.3390/d16030180 - 16 Mar 2024
Viewed by 606
Abstract
In the estuaries of Korea, the freshwater inflow increases rapidly due to the Changma (Korean summer rainy season). To elucidate the effect of this massive freshwater inflow on the benthic polychaete community, a survey was conducted before, during, and after the rainy season. [...] Read more.
In the estuaries of Korea, the freshwater inflow increases rapidly due to the Changma (Korean summer rainy season). To elucidate the effect of this massive freshwater inflow on the benthic polychaete community, a survey was conducted before, during, and after the rainy season. Comparing the environmental characteristics before and after the rainy season, the salinity and dissolved oxygen decreased, the sand content of sediment was significantly reduced, and silt increased. The number of species decreased sharply, and this change was more considerable at sites closer to the estuary. Loimia sp. and Pseudopotamilla sp., the dominant species before the rainy season, were not found after the rainy season. The massive freshwater inflow during the rainy season has been a tremendous stress on the benthic environment and significantly alters the species composition and distribution of benthic polychaetes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics of Marine Communities)
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11 pages, 8151 KiB  
Article
Spatial Distribution Pattern of the Mesozooplankton Community in Ross Sea Region Marine Protected Area (RSR MPA) during Summer
by Sung Hoon Kim, Wuju Son, Jeong-Hoon Kim and Hyoung Sul La
Diversity 2024, 16(3), 174; https://doi.org/10.3390/d16030174 - 08 Mar 2024
Viewed by 661
Abstract
The Ross Sea region Marine Protected Area (RSR MPA) is one of the most productive regions in the Southern Ocean. Mesozooplankton intermediates the primary product to the higher predators, such as penguins and seals, in this ecosystem. In this study, the mesozooplankton community [...] Read more.
The Ross Sea region Marine Protected Area (RSR MPA) is one of the most productive regions in the Southern Ocean. Mesozooplankton intermediates the primary product to the higher predators, such as penguins and seals, in this ecosystem. In this study, the mesozooplankton community structure and spatial pattern in the RSR MPA in January were investigated by using 505 μm-mesh-size bongo net samples. As a result, 37 mesozooplankton taxa with a total mean abundance of 35.26 ind./m3, ranging from 2.94 to 139.17 ind./m3, were confirmed. Of the 37 taxa, 7 occupied almost 84% of the total abundance, with copepods being the main dominant taxa. As shown by our hierarchical analysis, the mesozooplankton community was divided into four groups, each associated with a specific geographical distribution. Group A was composed of stations around Terra Nova Bay and showed relatively low abundance. Group B included stations around the continental slope region. Group D was composed of the Ross Sea continental shelf stations, while group C consisted of stations geographically located between those of groups B and D. These four groups were influenced by various environmental factors, such as water temperature, salinity, and nutrients. In summary, the mesozooplankton community can be separated according to geographical pattern. This pattern is related to several environmental factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics of Marine Communities)
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15 pages, 5071 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Sessile Benthic Communities in Jeju Island, Republic of Korea, Using Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS)
by Kyeong-Tae Lee, Taihun Kim, Gun-Hoo Park, Chulhong Oh, Heung-Sik Park, Do-Hyung Kang, Hyun-Sil Kang and Hyun-Sung Yang
Diversity 2024, 16(2), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/d16020083 - 26 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1026
Abstract
Assessing the effectiveness of artificial structures as a monitoring tool for benthic diversity in temperate reefs is crucial to determining their relevance in reef conservation and management. In this study, we utilized Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS) to evaluate sessile benthic communities that [...] Read more.
Assessing the effectiveness of artificial structures as a monitoring tool for benthic diversity in temperate reefs is crucial to determining their relevance in reef conservation and management. In this study, we utilized Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS) to evaluate sessile benthic communities that colonized ARMS units after 12 and 34 months of immersion within distinct habitats (coral-dominated and macroalgae-dominated habitats) in Jeju Island, Korea. We used two methods: image analysis of the ARMS plates and DNA metabarcoding of the ARMS units. We found significant differences in the sessile benthic community between the plate faces, installation periods, and habitats. DNA metabarcoding also revealed differences in sessile benthic diversity among habitats. Additionally, we identified the Lithophyllum genus within the crustose coralline algae community, whose dominance might trigger a transition to coral-dominated habitats in Jeju Island. We recommend integrating ARMS image analysis with DNA metabarcoding to enhance and complement studies focusing on benthic diversity. By utilizing ARMS, this study provides valuable information for understanding sessile benthic communities and biodiversity, contributing to an enhanced understanding of the responses of ecological communities to climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics of Marine Communities)
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13 pages, 4504 KiB  
Article
Impact of Complex Oceanographic Features on Seasonal Phytoplankton Community and Biodiversity from 2018 to 2020 in the Vicinity of Dokdo (Island), Offshore Korea
by Seung Ho Baek, Minji Lee, Chung Hyeon Lee, Chan Hong Park, Yun-Bae Kim, Jung Hoon Kang and Young Kyun Lim
Diversity 2023, 15(12), 1166; https://doi.org/10.3390/d15121166 - 23 Nov 2023
Viewed by 888
Abstract
Dokdo, a volcanic island located in offshore waters, is significantly influenced by various currents and the island effect resulting from upwelling events. Despite these factors, there is a limited understanding of the seasonal changes in phytoplankton populations and their relationship with the environmental [...] Read more.
Dokdo, a volcanic island located in offshore waters, is significantly influenced by various currents and the island effect resulting from upwelling events. Despite these factors, there is a limited understanding of the seasonal changes in phytoplankton populations and their relationship with the environmental factors in the waters around Dokdo, even during dramatic shifts in phytoplankton dynamics. We focused on seasonal oceanographic features over three years (2018, 2019, and 2020) to understand the phytoplankton community structure and seasonal species succession. Winter, characterized by thorough mixing, results in high nutrient levels, leading to increased phytoplankton biomass. The dominance of the large-sized diatom Chaetoceros spp. contributes to relatively low diversity (H’: 1.14 ± 0.31). In contrast to the typical coastal waters, spring exhibits dominance by the small nano-flagellates and Cryptomonas spp. associated with a lack of surface nutrients due to increased water temperature. Summer, characterized by strong stratification, shows low phytoplankton biomass but high Chl. a concentrations, possibly influenced by picoplankton and the emergence of dinoflagellates, such as Gyrodinium sp. and Katodinium sp., which increases diversity (H’: 2.18 ± 0.28). In autumn, there is typically a phytoplankton bloom, but in 2019, an unusually low biomass occurred. This was likely due to the intrusion of deep, cold water from the bottom and low-salinity Changjiang diluted water (CDW) from the surface, increasing the water’s stability. This, in turn, led to nutrient depletion, contributing to a rise in diversity (H’: 1.14 ± 0.31). These environmentally complex waters around Dokdo result in a distinct pattern of biodiversity indices, with the highest in summer and the lowest in winter, differing from typical temperate waters. In conclusion, this research highlights the substantial influence of distinctive oceanographic features and nutrient dynamics on the phytoplankton biomass and biodiversity in the Ulleung Basin and Dokdo region. Understanding these patterns is vital for the effective management of marine ecosystems and fisheries resources, emphasizing the necessity for continued long-term monitoring in the vicinity of the Dokdo area. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamics of Marine Communities)
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