Special Issue "DNA Barcoding and Biodiversity Research"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Axel Hausmann
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Entomology Department, SNSB/Bavarian State Collection of Zoology, Munich, Germany
Interests: DNA barcoding; Lepidoptera; Geometridae; biodiversity; taxonomy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In 2003, Paul D.N. Hebert (et al.) published a famous article on “Biological identifications through DNA barcodes”, which can be considered the starting point of a new age in biodiversity research, based on “DNA Barcoding”. Since then, a large amount of data has been gathered, currently comprising >4.3 Mio COI sequences of the "barcode fragment" with close to 400,000 barcode clusters (BINs) for animals. More and more data are validated and set out on Open Access through the Barcode of Life data systems (BOLD). In many parts of the world, and for many groups of organisms, the data coverage is sufficient to allow a broad set of applications in biodiversity research, taxonomy, nature conservation, monitoring, and in various other socio-economical fields. The planned Special Issue on “DNA barcoding and biodiversity research” will present an array of papers on different aspects of DNA barcoding and biodiversity research based on molecular data. Collectively, then, the contributions to this issue will hopefully impact future approaches to biodiversity research.

Dr. Axel Hausmann
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • DNA Barcoding
  • Biodiversity Research
  • Barcoding Technologies
  • Applications of DNA Barcoding
  • DNA Library
  • Barcoding Museum Specimens
  • Next-Gen-Sequencing

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Building a Plant DNA Barcode Reference Library for a Diverse Tropical Flora: An Example from Queensland, Australia
Diversity 2016, 8(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/d8010005 - 29 Feb 2016
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2590
Abstract
A foundation for a DNA barcode reference library for the tropical plants of Australia is presented here. A total of 1572 DNA barcode sequences are compiled from 848 tropical Queensland species. The dataset represents 35% of the total flora of Queensland’s Wet Tropics [...] Read more.
A foundation for a DNA barcode reference library for the tropical plants of Australia is presented here. A total of 1572 DNA barcode sequences are compiled from 848 tropical Queensland species. The dataset represents 35% of the total flora of Queensland’s Wet Tropics Bioregion, 57% of its tree species and 28% of the shrub species. For approximately half of the sampled species, we investigated the occurrence of infraspecific molecular variation in DNA barcode loci rbcLa, matK, and the trnH-psbA intergenic spacer region across previously recognized biogeographic barriers. We found preliminary support for the notion that DNA barcode reference libraries can be used as a tool for inferring biogeographic patterns at regional scales. It is expected that this dataset will find applications in taxonomic, ecological, and applied conservation research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DNA Barcoding and Biodiversity Research)
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Article
Can Theory Improve the Scope of Quantitative Metazoan Metabarcoding?
Diversity 2016, 8(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/d8010001 - 29 Dec 2015
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2522
Abstract
Using high-throughput sequencing approaches to quantify biodiversity has a number of hurdles, in particular that the number of reads for a given taxon may not be proportional to the number of individuals of that taxon in a sample. Here, we consider whether summary [...] Read more.
Using high-throughput sequencing approaches to quantify biodiversity has a number of hurdles, in particular that the number of reads for a given taxon may not be proportional to the number of individuals of that taxon in a sample. Here, we consider whether summary statistics generated in the course of population genetic analyses (such as estimates of haplotype diversity and mutation rate) may be useful in reverse inference of the number of individuals input to an assay. Although our results show that these statistics—combined with the observed number of segregating sites and number of haplotypes in the assay—may be informative, there remain significant concerns about the ability to “metabarcode” a sample and infer relative species abundance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DNA Barcoding and Biodiversity Research)
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Review

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Review
DNA Barcoding as a Molecular Tool to Track Down Mislabeling and Food Piracy
Diversity 2016, 8(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/d8010002 - 29 Dec 2015
Cited by 41 | Viewed by 5674
Abstract
DNA barcoding is a molecular technology that allows the identification of any biological species by amplifying, sequencing and querying the information from genic and/or intergenic standardized target regions belonging to the extranuclear genomes. Although these sequences represent a small fraction of the total [...] Read more.
DNA barcoding is a molecular technology that allows the identification of any biological species by amplifying, sequencing and querying the information from genic and/or intergenic standardized target regions belonging to the extranuclear genomes. Although these sequences represent a small fraction of the total DNA of a cell, both chloroplast and mitochondrial barcodes chosen for identifying plant and animal species, respectively, have shown sufficient nucleotide diversity to assess the taxonomic identity of the vast majority of organisms used in agriculture. Consequently, cpDNA and mtDNA barcoding protocols are being used more and more in the food industry and food supply chains for food labeling, not only to support food safety but also to uncover food piracy in freshly commercialized and technologically processed products. Since the extranuclear genomes are present in many copies within each cell, this technology is being more easily exploited to recover information even in degraded samples or transformed materials deriving from crop varieties and livestock species. The strong standardization that characterizes protocols used worldwide for DNA barcoding makes this technology particularly suitable for routine analyses required by agencies to safeguard food safety and quality. Here we conduct a critical review of the potentials of DNA barcoding for food labeling along with the main findings in the area of food piracy, with particular reference to agrifood and livestock foodstuffs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue DNA Barcoding and Biodiversity Research)
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