Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment in Otolaryngology

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Medical Imaging and Theranostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 871

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Otorhinolaryngology Unit, Head and Neck Surgery, Candiolo Cancer Institute, FPO-IRCCS, Candiolo, 10060 Turin, Italy
Interests: head and neck surgery; ENT

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the field of ENT/head and neck surgery has experienced considerable changes regarding the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to many diseases thanks to outstanding pharmacological and technological progress. For example, advances in the field of imaging are refining the diagnostic power of multiparametric MRI, as well as supporting the wider use of choline PET. The recently introduced biologic therapy for recurrent nasal polyposis is transforming its therapeutic paradigm, which has long been limited to surgery and systemic corticosteroids; correspondingly, monoclonal antibodies for specific oncological pathways represent an additional method that can be incorporated into the management of head and neck malignancies. New technologies are also improving surgical approaches, such as parathyroid autofluorescence detection for thyroid surgery, indocyanine green video angiography for the evaluation of flap vascularization, and robotically or exoscopically assisted procedures for tailored dissection. These radical changes represent exciting advancements for clinicians, but also highlight the importance of continuously updating our knowledge on the biological pathways of certain diseases and mastering the use of new technologies in the surgical theatre.

The aim of the present Special Issue is therefore to provide an overview of current developments in the head and neck field, with a particular focus on the most promising future perspectives.

Original research articles and reviews are particularly welcome. Case reports/series (preferably with literature reviews of previous cases), authors’ viewpoints, and other types of papers will be considered only if related to the original use of technologies/molecules/surgical techniques or if they discuss topics that could not be better investigated through reviews.

Dr. Stefano Bondi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • head and neck surgery
  • ENT
  • diagnostic issues
  • technological advancement
  • surgical technique
  • molecular target
  • tailored medicine

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 585 KiB  
Article
Side- and Sinus-Specific Relationships between Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Ischemic Stroke Using Imaging Analyses
by Eun Hyun Cho, Kyung Hoon Park, Ji Hee Kim, Heejin Kim, Hyo-Jeong Lee and Jee Hye Wee
Diagnostics 2024, 14(12), 1266; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics14121266 - 15 Jun 2024
Viewed by 280
Abstract
Recent studies have reported chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) as an independent risk factor for stroke. However, the association with stroke depending on the affected sinuses has not been explored. This study aimed to elucidate the side- and sinus-specific relationship between CRS and ischemic stroke [...] Read more.
Recent studies have reported chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) as an independent risk factor for stroke. However, the association with stroke depending on the affected sinuses has not been explored. This study aimed to elucidate the side- and sinus-specific relationship between CRS and ischemic stroke through imaging analyses. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who were diagnosed with ischemic stroke at a tertiary center. CRS was defined as having a total score of greater than or equal to 4, according to the Lund–Mackay scoring system, through brain magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography. We investigated the side- and sinus-specific correlation between CRS and ischemic stroke. Subgroup analyses were performed for different age groups. CRS prevalence in patients with ischemic stroke was 18.4%, which was higher than the previously reported prevalence in the general population. Overall, there was no correlation between the directions of the CRS and ischemic stroke (p > 0.05). When each sinus was analyzed, the frontal (Cramer’s V = 0.479, p < 0.001), anterior (Cramer’s V = 0.396, p < 0.001)/posterior (Cramer’s V = 0.300, p = 0.008) ethmoid, and sphenoid (Cramer’s V = 0.383, p = 0.005) sinuses showed a statistically significant correlation with the side of stroke, but the maxillary sinus (Cramer’s V = 0.138, p = 0.208) did not. In subgroup analyses, a significant right-side correlation between the two diseases was observed in the older-age subgroup (≥65 years old, Cramer’s V = 0.142, p = 0.040). Diabetes mellitus (odds ratio = 1.596, 95% confidence interval = 1.204–2.116) was identified as an independent risk factor for having CRS in patients with ischemic stroke. CRS of the frontal, anterior/posterior ethmoid, and sphenoid sinuses has a directional relationship with ischemic stroke. Our results on which sinuses correlate with stroke advocate for the active surveillance of CRS in patients at high risk of ischemic stroke. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment in Otolaryngology)
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11 pages, 4232 KiB  
Article
High-Frequency Vestibular Function Is Vulnerable to Presbyvestibulopathy
by Seonghoon Bae, Jimin Yun, Seungmin Kwak, Hyuntaek Jung, Hancheol Lee, Juyoung Kim, Chanhee Kim, Yujin Lee and Sunghuhn Kim
Diagnostics 2024, 14(12), 1224; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics14121224 - 11 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Introduction: In 2019, mild vestibular function deficiency in elder populations was defined as presbyvestibulopathy (PVP) by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society. The diagnostic criteria include tests for low-, mid-, and high-frequency vestibular function, represented by caloric testing, rotary chair testing, and [...] Read more.
Introduction: In 2019, mild vestibular function deficiency in elder populations was defined as presbyvestibulopathy (PVP) by the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society. The diagnostic criteria include tests for low-, mid-, and high-frequency vestibular function, represented by caloric testing, rotary chair testing, and head impulse testing, respectively. However, there is still a lack of large-scale reports supporting the relationship between vestibular function tests (VFTs) and aging. In this study, we evaluated whether each test is correlated with aging in the elderly population aged over 50. Methods: This study retrospectively enrolled 1043 subjects from a single university hospital database after excluding those with unilateral and bilateral vestibulopathy, central dizziness, and acute dizziness. Enrolled subjects had caloric canal paresis <20%, vHIT lateral canal gain >0.6, vHIT interaural difference <0.3, and age >50 years old. Results: Significant negative correlations with age were identified in the vHIT (p < 0.001) and rotary chair test (RCT) 1.0 Hz gain (p = 0.030). However, the caloric test (p = 0.739 and 0.745 on the left and right sides, respectively) and RCT 0.12 Hz gain (p = 0.298) did not show a significant correlation with age. A total of 4.83% of subjects aged 70 years or older showed sub-normal vHIT gain that met the criteria of PVP, whereas only 0.50% of subjects aged 60 to 69 did. The prevalence of sub-normal caloric test results, however, was not significantly different between the two age groups (21.55% in the 60–69 age group and 26.59% in the >70 age group). Conclusions: The high-frequency range vestibular function seems vulnerable to aging, and this is more discernible at age >70 years. The weak correlation between age and low-frequency vestibular function tests, such as the caloric test and low-frequency rotary chair testing, suggests the need to revisit the diagnostic criteria for PVP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment in Otolaryngology)
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