Special Issue "Integrated Sustainable Building Design, Construction and Operation"

A special issue of Designs (ISSN 2411-9660).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Fitsum Tariku

Building Science Centre of Excellence, British Columbia Institute of Technology, 3700 Willingdon Ave., Burnaby, BC, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-604-432-8402
Fax: +1-604-430-0145
Interests: advanced and sustainable building materials; high-performance building envelope systems; whole-building performance optimization and decision-making; novel building technologies integration; net-zero building design and operation
Guest Editor
Dr. Emishaw Iffa

Building Science Centre of Excellence, British Columbia Institute of Technology, 3700 Willingdon Ave., Burnaby, BC, Canada
Website | E-Mail
Interests: high performance building envelope; advanced building materials; ventilation systems; whole-building performances and thermal imaging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Buildings consume nearly 40% of the world energy according to International Energy Agency (IEA) and the demand is growing continuously. Moreover, buildings are also responsible for the considerable amount of greenhouse gas emissions, raw material and water use, and landfill waste. An integrated sustainable building design approach helps in creating efficient ways of using resources such as energy, raw materials and water.  Sustainable buildings also create an improved indoor environmental quality and sustainable environment. This Special issue on sustainable building design focuses on bringing original research and literature reviews from different areas related to building design, construction, operation, retrofitting and practices of sustainability. Manuscript submissions in the areas mentioned as keywords below are highly encouraged.

Dr. Fitsum Tariku
Dr. Emishaw Iffa
Prof. Dr. Thomas Schroepfer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Designs is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • advanced and sustainable building materials
  • high-performance building envelope
  • whole building performance
  • moisture management
  • indoor environmental quality
  • building operations and control systems
  • intelligent building systems
  • net zero buildings
  • carbon neutral buildings
  • life cycle assessment
  • climate-responsive design optimization and integration
  • advanced and sustainable design methods and building processes

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Design of a New Solar Thermal Collector with Ceramic Materials Integrated into the Building Facades
Received: 21 June 2018 / Revised: 17 October 2018 / Accepted: 23 October 2018 / Published: 1 November 2018
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Abstract
The work presented here aims to demonstrate the technical, architectural, and energy viability of solar thermal collectors made with ceramic materials and their suitability for domestic hot water (DHW) and building heating systems in the Mediterranean climate. The proposal is for the design
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The work presented here aims to demonstrate the technical, architectural, and energy viability of solar thermal collectors made with ceramic materials and their suitability for domestic hot water (DHW) and building heating systems in the Mediterranean climate. The proposal is for the design of a ceramic shell, formed by collector and non-collecting panels, which forms part of the building system itself, and is capable of responding to the basic requirements of a building envelope and harnessing solar energy. Ceramics considerably reduce the final cost of the collector system and offer the new system a variety of compositional and chromatic finishes, occupying the entire building surface and achieving a high degree of architectural integration, although less energy-efficient compared to a conventional metallic collector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Sustainable Building Design, Construction and Operation)
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Open AccessArticle Evaluating Design Strategies for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings in the Middle East and North Africa Regions
Received: 30 July 2018 / Revised: 21 September 2018 / Accepted: 25 September 2018 / Published: 29 September 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1935 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
There is international pressure for countries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which are blamed as the main cause of climate change. The countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region heavily rely on fossil fuel as the main energy source for
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There is international pressure for countries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which are blamed as the main cause of climate change. The countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region heavily rely on fossil fuel as the main energy source for buildings. The concept of nearly zero energy buildings (nZEB) has been defined and standardized for some developed countries. While most of the developing countries located in the MENA region with hot and tropical climate lack building energy efficiency standards. With pressure to improve energy and environmental performance of buildings, nZEB buildings are expected to grow over the coming years and employing these buildings in the MENA region can reduce building energy consumption and CO2 emissions. Therefore, the paper focuses on: (a) reviewing the current established nZEB standards and definitions for countries in the hot and warm climate of Europe, (b) investigate the primary energy consumption for current existing buildings in the MENA region, and (c) establishing a standard for nZEB and positive energy buildings in kWh/m2/year for the MENA region using a building simulation platform represented using Autodesk Insight 360. The result of the simulation reveals high energy use intensity for existing buildings in the MENA region. By improving building fabric and applying solar photovoltaics (PV) in the base model, significant reductions in primary energy consumption was achieved. Further design improvements, such as increasing the airtightness and using high efficiency solar PV, also contributed to positive energy buildings that produce more energy than they consume. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Sustainable Building Design, Construction and Operation)
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Open AccessArticle A Modular Timber Construction System for the Sustainable Vertical Extension of Office Buildings
Received: 21 June 2018 / Revised: 17 July 2018 / Accepted: 25 July 2018 / Published: 8 August 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5691 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Most European cities are facing urban densification issues. In this context, a solution to create usable spaces without additional pressure on land consists in the vertical extension of existing buildings. Given their abundance in the building stock, tertiary buildings offer an important potential.
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Most European cities are facing urban densification issues. In this context, a solution to create usable spaces without additional pressure on land consists in the vertical extension of existing buildings. Given their abundance in the building stock, tertiary buildings offer an important potential. The paper introduces the Working Space project, which aims to develop an innovative, modular and prefabricated timber construction system adapted to the vertical extension of existing office buildings. The dimensions of the system can be adjusted to a great variety of structural grids and allows for any new typological organisation. Based on the principles of bioclimatic architecture, the extension’s envelope provides high-performance insulation, a smart management of passive solar gains, natural ventilation and free cooling, but also offers large surfaces dedicated to photovoltaic energy production and urban biodiversity. The system is made up of eco-friendly, local materials with very low environmental impact. The project’s outcomes are presented at a variety of scales, from urban design to construction details, as well as the outputs of an extensive life cycle assessment including the induced mobility impacts. Finally, the paper introduces a first application of this innovative architectural concept, which is currently being completed in Lausanne, Switzerland. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Sustainable Building Design, Construction and Operation)
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Open AccessArticle The Design of Net-Zero-Energy Affordable Housing in Philadelphia
Received: 10 June 2018 / Revised: 28 June 2018 / Accepted: 17 July 2018 / Published: 23 July 2018
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Abstract
Sustainable buildings are often considered expensive alternatives to conventional designs. However, a decline in costs associated with materials, technology, labor and whole building approaches make green homes realistic to construct even within low-income neighborhoods. This can address the critical shortage of affordable housing
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Sustainable buildings are often considered expensive alternatives to conventional designs. However, a decline in costs associated with materials, technology, labor and whole building approaches make green homes realistic to construct even within low-income neighborhoods. This can address the critical shortage of affordable housing in cities, and the emerging recognition of their impact on healthy communities. This study proposes an affordable and energy-efficient design for a low-income rowhouse in Philadelphia as a city having the highest poverty rate in the U.S. The design can be replicated as an investment in the future where people live with net zero energy and zero emissions. Furthermore, residents have the opportunity to create a more vibrant and healthy neighborhood economy by investing their savings locally. The results showed that the proposed prototype has a payback of approximately just over 16 years. Although this seems long, the building is affordable since the ongoing operating expenses are significantly less than a typical house. This is achieved by the combination of an efficient building design, onsite power generation, water conservation and rainwater harvesting. The payback period may suggest that larger-scale projects than just a single urban residence (two residences and larger) are needed to improve investment paybacks. This is discussed. Considering the added benefits (energy and water) that will continue after the payback period, the design can be a pioneer for low-income neighborhoods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Sustainable Building Design, Construction and Operation)
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Open AccessArticle Parametric Study of the Behavior of Longitudinally and Transversally Prestressed Concrete under Pure Torsion
Received: 28 March 2018 / Revised: 19 April 2018 / Accepted: 20 April 2018 / Published: 24 April 2018
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Abstract
Among several analytical models to describe the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) and longitudinally prestressed concrete (LPC) beams under torsion, the Modified Variable Angle Truss Model (MVATM) is particularly efficient to capture the behavioral states of the member until failure and agree well
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Among several analytical models to describe the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) and longitudinally prestressed concrete (LPC) beams under torsion, the Modified Variable Angle Truss Model (MVATM) is particularly efficient to capture the behavioral states of the member until failure and agree well with experimental results. This article aims to extend the MVATM to cover transversally prestressed concrete (TPC) beams under torsion. The changes in the formulation and calculation procedure of the original VATM, in order to include the influence of transversal prestress, are presented. The extended MAVTM is then used to compute the global response of LPC and TPC beams under torsion with similar total prestress reinforcement ratios, namely the torque–twist curves. The obtained predictions are then compared and discussed. It is shown that for the ultimate loading, transversal prestress constitutes also an effective solution to improve the behavior of the beams under torsion. However, transversal prestress is less effective to delay the cracked state. Finally, it is also shown that when prestress is distributed in both longitudinal and transversal direction, the global response of the beams under torsion is further improved, namely the resistance torque and the torsional stiffness in the cracked state. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Sustainable Building Design, Construction and Operation)
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