Special Issue "2021 Article Series of Canadian Association of General Practitioners in Oncology"

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 March 2022) | Viewed by 7974

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Genevieve Chaput
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Family Medicine, Secondary Care and Oncology Departments, McGill University Health Centre, and McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
Interests: cancer survivorship; communication in healthcare; palliative medicine
Dr. Evan Lilly
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Family Medicine, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
Interests: psychosocial oncology; primary palliative care; cancer survivorship

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Canadian Association of General Practitioners in Oncology (CAGPO) is pleased to partner with Current Oncology for their upcoming third article series targeting all health professionals involved in oncology and palliative care. Our six-article educational series has been produced by recognized experts and will cover relevant and evidence-driven supportive care topics, as well as the latest treatment advances in oncology.

Dr. Genevieve Chaput
Dr. Evan Lilly
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Editorial
Oncology Care Provision: Planning for Today, Tomorrow, and Years to Come
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(6), 4774-4775; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28060403 - 17 Nov 2021
Viewed by 662
Abstract
Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Canadian Cancer Society had already projected added pressures on cancer care services, predicting an increase of 79% in cancer cases by 2028–2032 [...] Full article

Review

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Review
Practical Considerations for the Management of Cancer-Associated Venous Thromboembolism: A Guide for the General Oncology Practitioner
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(9), 6419-6432; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29090505 - 08 Sep 2022
Viewed by 830
Abstract
Cancer-associated venous thromboembolism is a devastating complication of cancer and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of cancer-associated venous thromboembolism treatment is anticoagulation, and in recent years, there have been notable randomized clinical trials that have revealed insights into the [...] Read more.
Cancer-associated venous thromboembolism is a devastating complication of cancer and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The cornerstone of cancer-associated venous thromboembolism treatment is anticoagulation, and in recent years, there have been notable randomized clinical trials that have revealed insights into the efficacy and safety of direct oral anticoagulants and low-molecular-weight heparin in the treatment of cancer-associated thrombosis. Deciding on the ideal anticoagulation treatment plan for a patient with a cancer-associated thrombosis is a complex task that requires an understanding of clinical trial data, society guidelines, and, most importantly, consideration of many cancer-related, treatment-related, and patient-related factors. This article summarizes important factors to consider when deciding on anticoagulation therapy for a patient with cancer-associated thrombosis. Full article
Review
Management of Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Review for General Practitioners in Oncology
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(9), 6245-6259; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29090491 - 30 Aug 2022
Viewed by 1236
Abstract
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematologic malignancy that most frequently develops in older adults. Overall, AML is associated with a high mortality although advancements in genetic risk stratification and new treatments are leading to improvements in outcomes for some subgroups. In this [...] Read more.
Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematologic malignancy that most frequently develops in older adults. Overall, AML is associated with a high mortality although advancements in genetic risk stratification and new treatments are leading to improvements in outcomes for some subgroups. In this review, we discuss an individualized approach to intensive therapy with a focus on the role of recently approved novel therapies as well as the selection of post-remission therapies for patients in first remission. We discuss the management of patients with relapsed and refractory AML, including the role of targeted treatment and allogeneic stem cell transplant. Next, we review non-intensive treatment for older and unfit AML patients including the use of azacitidine and venetoclax. Finally, we discuss the integration of palliative care in the management of patients with AML. Full article
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Review
Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in 2022: A Review for General Practitioners in Oncology
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(3), 1828-1839; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29030150 - 09 Mar 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3243
Abstract
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in Canada and a significant cause of morbidity for patients and their loved ones. There have been rapid advances in preventing, screening and treating this disease. Here, we present a contemporary review of treatment [...] Read more.
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in Canada and a significant cause of morbidity for patients and their loved ones. There have been rapid advances in preventing, screening and treating this disease. Here, we present a contemporary review of treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in Canada based on current best practices. The focus of this review is to highlight recent data in screening for lung cancer, management of patients with early and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer, as well as management of patients with metastatic disease. There is a special focus on the incorporation of immunotherapy into practice and its associated toxicities. Full article
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Other

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Perspective
Developments in the Management of Metastatic HER2-Positive Breast Cancer: A Review
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(4), 2539-2549; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29040208 - 08 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1418
Abstract
Approximately 20% of breast cancers overexpress human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), providing an actionable target for many different therapies. In the metastatic setting, prognosis has improved greatly with the use of anti-HER2 drugs such as trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and trastuzumab-emtansine. In the [...] Read more.
Approximately 20% of breast cancers overexpress human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), providing an actionable target for many different therapies. In the metastatic setting, prognosis has improved greatly with the use of anti-HER2 drugs such as trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and trastuzumab-emtansine. In the third line setting and beyond, several emerging treatments have shown benefits, including novel small molecule targeted agents and antibody-drug conjugates. Systemic treatment of brain metastases in HER2-positive patients and the role of endocrine-based treatment for patients with hormone receptor (HR) positive disease remain areas of research interest. This article will review the current approach to systemic management of metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer in Canada, and present novel treatments that may be available in the near future. Full article
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