Surgery Advances in Gynecologic Tumors

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729). This special issue belongs to the section "Gynecologic Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 4806

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M4N 3M5, Canada
Interests: cervical cancer; laparoscopic and innovative surgery; sentinel lymph nodes; fertility-sparing procedures in gynecologic oncology; gestational trophoblastic tumours

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The field of gynecologic oncology has undergone dramatic changes over the past few decades. In the early days of gynecologic oncology (1960s), most surgeries involved laparotomies with significant blood loss and postoperative morbidity. Attention has been focused on a reduction in morbidity, improvement in efficacy, tailoring the surgery to the patient/cancer, postoperative management (ERAS), and other initiatives. The significant advances that have occurred due to all of the above should not be underestimated.

Included amongst these advances are those related to surgery, both in terms of knowledge and surgical techniques. These have been noted in the fields of cancer debulking, HIPEC, fertility sparing procedures, sentinel lymph nodes, vulvar/vaginal reconstruction, MIS surgery including laparoscopy and robotics, and postoperative management, to highlight a few. This Special Issue will highlight many of these advances for gynecologic cancers.

We are pleased to invite you to submit an original article or review that highlights surgical advances in gynecologic oncology. This could include any of the topics listed above.

In this Special Issue, original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

Surgical advances in gynecologic oncology or cancers; including (but not limited to) new techniques, or new knowledge/trends.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Allan L. Covens
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gynecologic oncology
  • surgery
  • surgical advances

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

11 pages, 494 KiB  
Article
Combined Interval Cytoreductive Surgery and Carboplatin-Based Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Advanced Primary High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer
by Claudèle Brault, Alexandre Brind’Amour, Lara de Guerke, Marie-Hélène Auclair, Lucas Sideris, Pierre Dubé, Mikaël Soucisse, Jean-François Tremblay, Laurence Bernard, Sabrina Piedimonte and Suzanne Fortin
Curr. Oncol. 2023, 30(12), 10272-10282; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol30120748 - 01 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1006
Abstract
Combining interval cytoreductive surgery (CRS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) improves survival in advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). Although limited, growing evidence regarding carboplatin-based HIPEC highlights its potential. This retrospective study included all patients with advanced primary high-grade serous ovarian cancer who underwent [...] Read more.
Combining interval cytoreductive surgery (CRS) with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) improves survival in advanced epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). Although limited, growing evidence regarding carboplatin-based HIPEC highlights its potential. This retrospective study included all patients with advanced primary high-grade serous ovarian cancer who underwent interval CRS combined with carboplatin-based HIPEC at our Canadian tertiary care center between 2014 and 2020. We identified 40 patients with a median age of 61 years. The median peritoneal cancer index was 13 and complete cytoreduction was achieved in 38 patients (95%). Median hospital stay was 13 days and there were four admissions to the intensive care unit (10%) and six readmissions (15%). Severe adverse events occurred in eight patients (20%) and there was no perioperative death. Recurrence was seen in 33 patients (82%) with a median DFS of 18.0 months and a median overall survival of 36.4 months. Multivariate analyses showed that age, peritoneal cancer index, completeness of cytoreduction, occurrence of severe complications, and bowel resection did not significantly impact DFS or OS in our cohort. Interval CRS combined with carboplatin-based HIPEC for advanced primary EOC is associated with acceptable morbidity and oncological outcomes. Larger studies are required to determine the long-term outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surgery Advances in Gynecologic Tumors)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

11 pages, 230 KiB  
Review
Fertility Preservation in Cervical Cancer—Treatment Strategies and Indications
by Lina Salman and Allan Covens
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(1), 296-306; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31010019 - 04 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1833
Abstract
Cervical cancer is frequently diagnosed in women during their reproductive years, and fertility preservation is an essential part of their cancer treatment. In highly selected patients with early stage, low-risk cervical cancer and a tumor size ≤ 2 cm, several treatment strategies can [...] Read more.
Cervical cancer is frequently diagnosed in women during their reproductive years, and fertility preservation is an essential part of their cancer treatment. In highly selected patients with early stage, low-risk cervical cancer and a tumor size ≤ 2 cm, several treatment strategies can be offered for patients wishing to preserve fertility, including radical/simple trachelectomy or conization with pelvic lymph node assessment. Trachelectomy can be performed through a vaginal, abdominal, or minimally invasive approach and has been shown to have an equivalent oncologic outcome compared to radical hysterectomy. All surgical approaches for radical trachelectomy seem to have excellent survival with comparable oncologic outcomes. Nevertheless, patients undergoing vaginal trachelectomy have better obstetric outcomes compared to the other routes. In patients with larger tumors (2–4 cm), neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by fertility-sparing surgery is an alternative option. Several chemotherapy regimens have been used for this indication, with a pathologic complete response rate of 17–73%. For locally advanced diseases that require radical hysterectomy or primary chemoradiation, fertility preservation can be performed using oocyte, embryo, or ovarian tissue cryopreservation, as well as ovarian transposition. For these patients, future pregnancy is possible through surrogacy. In addition to fertility preservation, ovarian transposition, where the ovaries are repositioned outside of the radiation field, is performed to maintain ovarian hormonal function and prevent premature ovarian failure. In summary, fertility-preservation treatment strategies for patients with early stage cervical cancer are continuously evolving, and less radical surgeries are becoming more acceptable. Additional and ongoing evidence is helping determine the impact of conservative procedures on oncologic and obstetric outcomes in these patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surgery Advances in Gynecologic Tumors)
10 pages, 534 KiB  
Review
Enhanced Recovery after Surgery (ERAS) for Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Oncology Surgery: A Review
by Christa Aubrey and Gregg Nelson
Curr. Oncol. 2023, 30(10), 9357-9366; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol30100677 - 22 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1578
Abstract
Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) has established benefits in open gynecologic oncology surgery. However, the benefits for gynecologic oncology patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) are less well defined. We conducted a review of this topic after a comprehensive search of the peer-reviewed [...] Read more.
Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) has established benefits in open gynecologic oncology surgery. However, the benefits for gynecologic oncology patients undergoing minimally invasive surgery (MIS) are less well defined. We conducted a review of this topic after a comprehensive search of the peer-reviewed literature using MEDLINE and PubMed databases. Our search yielded 25 articles, 14 of which were original research articles, in 10 distinct patient cohorts describing ERAS in minimally invasive gynecologic oncology surgery. Major benefits of ERAS in MIS included: decreased length of stay and increased rates of same-day discharge, cost-savings, decreased opioid use, and increased patient satisfaction. ERAS in minimally invasive gynecologic oncology surgery is an area of great promise for both patients and the healthcare system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surgery Advances in Gynecologic Tumors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop