Special Issue "Discovering and Exploiting Natural Cosmetic Materials and Their Functional Mechanisms"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Chang-Gu Hyun
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry and Cosmetics, Jeju National University, Jeju 63243, Republic of Korea
Interests: natural products; secondary metabolites; skin inflammation; melanogenesis; anti-aging; microbiome; bioconversion; organic synthesis
Prof. Dr. Seung-Young Kim

Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering & Biotechnology, Sunmoon University, Chungnam 31460, Republic of Korea
Interests: natural product and chemistry; cosmetics; microbiology; chemical biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Natural products provide an interesting, largely unexplored source for the development of potential new cosmetic ingredients. As reflected in these facts, the global market demand for natural cosmetic ingredients such as plant extracts that can be used for depigmenting, antiwrinkle, and other cosmeceutical uses is also increasing. In fact, many global companies around the world are trying to develop inhibitors or activators related to collagen synthesis, melanogenesis, and skin inflammation. In addition, smart consumers using cosmetics tend to carefully review the mechanism of action of these inhibitors or activators.

Accordingly, this Special Issue on “Discovering and Exploiting Natural Cosmetic Materials and Their Functional Mechanisms” is aimed at presenting novel data on natural products and single compounds with skin protection and improvement activities, at either the enzymatic or the cellular levels through original papers and short communications, but also to provide an overview of the current knowledge in this field through reviews.

Prof. Dr. Chang-Gu Hyun
Prof. Dr. Seung-Young Kim
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Natural products
  • Antioxidant
  • Enzymatic activities
  • Melanogenesis
  • Collagen synthesis
  • Skin inflammation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) with Potential as Cosmetic Hair Formulations Made from Otoba Wax and Ultrahigh Pressure Homogenization
Cosmetics 2020, 7(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics7020042 - 04 Jun 2020
Abstract
The development and physicochemical characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) with potential for formulating hair cosmetic products were carried out. SLNs were made from Otoba wax, which is native to the tropical Andean region and has a high chemical composition of fatty acids [...] Read more.
The development and physicochemical characterization of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) with potential for formulating hair cosmetic products were carried out. SLNs were made from Otoba wax, which is native to the tropical Andean region and has a high chemical composition of fatty acids with intermediate chains. SLNs were formulated by preparing wax-in-water dispersions at two internal phase proportions (low = 5% w/w and high = 20% w/w), using the same ratio of surfactant system and preservatives. The coarse dispersions were subjected to ultrahigh pressure homogenization (UHPH), and thermal stability assays for 4 weeks were carried out, where changes in Creaming Index, droplet size, polydispersity, viscosity, zeta potential, conductivity, and pH were evaluated. The results showed that Otoba wax has a required HLB value around 9 and is mainly composed of lauric (~35%) and myristic (~45%), which have been reported to improve the condition of hair loss. Regarding the development on SLNs, it was found that the internal phase concentration did not considerably affect the physicochemical and microbiological properties. Likewise, it was found that UHPH enabled the production of SLNs with particle sizes <200 nm, low polydispersity (<0.3), high zeta potential values, and suitable physical and microbiological stability. Therefore, Otoba wax has potential for the development of SLNs applicable to cosmetic formulations, especially for hair products. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Broussonetia papyrifera Promotes Hair Growth Through the Regulation of β-Catenin and STAT6 Target Proteins: A Phototrichogram Analysis of Clinical Samples
Cosmetics 2020, 7(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics7020040 - 01 Jun 2020
Abstract
Broussonetia papyrifera (B.papyrifera), belonging to the Moraceae family, is known to elicit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-tyrosinase, anticancer, antinociceptive, and antimicrobial effects. The present study has been designed to examine the effects of B. papyrifera extract on hair growth through in vitro and [...] Read more.
Broussonetia papyrifera (B.papyrifera), belonging to the Moraceae family, is known to elicit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-tyrosinase, anticancer, antinociceptive, and antimicrobial effects. The present study has been designed to examine the effects of B. papyrifera extract on hair growth through in vitro and clinical samples. Real-time cell growth assay, T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (TCF/LEF), activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-6(STAT6) and STAT3 reporter gene function, and Western blotting was performed to examine whether B. papyrifera regulates the expression of target proteins implicated in the proliferation of human hair follicle dermal papilla (hHFDP) cells. In this human trial, using a phototrichogram, the effect of B. papyrifera on hair growth was examined by reconstitution analysis after shaving the hair of the clinical subject’s dorsal skin. B. papyrifera promoted growth equally in hHFDP cells, which is comparable to that of minoxidil and tofacitinib. Treatment with B. papyrifera extract enhanced the TCF/LEF-luciferase activity and increased the level of β-catenin protein. Moreover, B. papyrifera extract significantly suppressed interleukin-4 (IL4)-induced STAT6 phosphorylation. In clinical trial, using a phototrichogram, we assessed the hair density and total hair counts at 0, 6, and 12 weeks after the use of hair tonic containing B. papyrifera extract. After using the hair tonic for 12 weeks, the total hair count was significantly increased as compared with the subjects at the start date (n = 11). B. papyrifera promotes dermal papilla cells proliferation in vitro and clinically among human volunteers through the regulation of WNT-β-catenin and STAT6 pathways. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Antioxidant Activities of Jeju Wax Apple (Syzygium Samarangense) and Safety of Human Keratinocytes and Primary Skin Irritation Test
Cosmetics 2020, 7(2), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics7020039 - 23 May 2020
Abstract
This study analyzed the antioxidant activity, cell viability, and human skin primary irritation test using the hot-water extracts of the Syzygium samarangense. As a result of the recent warmer climate, tropical plants have flourished on Jeju Island, and S. samarangense is one [...] Read more.
This study analyzed the antioxidant activity, cell viability, and human skin primary irritation test using the hot-water extracts of the Syzygium samarangense. As a result of the recent warmer climate, tropical plants have flourished on Jeju Island, and S. samarangense is one of these plants known to have biological activities. In this study, the hot-water extract of S. samarangense leaf and branch was analyzed. Antioxidant activity was measured by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) and ABTS (2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethyl-benzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) assays, and the DMPD (dimethyl-4-phenylenediamine) radical scavenging activity, nitrite scavenging activity, ferrous-ion chelating activity, cupric reducing antioxidant capacity, reducing power assay, ferric reducing antioxidant power, total phenol content, and total flavonoid content were also measured. In addition, cell viability was measured by MTT assay in human keratinocyte cells (HaCaT), and the safety of the extract for use on the skin was evaluated in the human skin primary irritation test. The antioxidant activities, except DMPD radical scavenging activity and ferrous-ion chelating activity, were stronger in the branch extract than in leaf extract, and the total phenol and flavonoid contents were also higher in the branch extract. Slight irritation was observed in the human skin primary irritation test. However, it was possible to observe sufficient antioxidant capacity at a concentration lower than the concentration used in the irritation test; therefore, if the concentration of the extract is appropriately adjusted, this suggests that it is a possible natural material suitable for use in cosmetics. Full article
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