Special Issue "Coatings for Cutting and Stamping Tools: Recent Advances"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Luis Norberto López De Lacalle
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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering (High Performance Manufacturing Group), University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Parque Tecnológico de Zamudio 202, 48170 Bilbao, Spain
Interests: manufacturing process; aeronautics; machine tools; Industry 4.0; machining
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Jose Luis Endrino
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Guest Editor
(1) BCMaterials, Basque Center for Materials, Applications and Nanostructures, UPV/EHU Science Park, 48940 Leioa, Spain
(2) IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, 48013 Bilbao, Spain
Interests: tribology; manufacturing of functional materials; nanomaterials; nanotechnology; sensor technologies; smart materials; surface engineering
Prof. Dr. Adriano Fagali de Souza
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Guest Editor
Research group on Computer Aided Manufacturing (GPCAM), Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Dona Francisca, 8300, Joinville-SC 89219-600, Brazil
Interests: machining of free-form geometries; micro-milling; machining force; die and moulds manufacturing; additive manufacturing; CAD/CAM/CAx integration and development; injection of plastic parts; 4.0 industry
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to the current demand for manufactured goods, the use of higher cost machine tools with improved performance is justified because of the increase in process productivity through the application of higher cutting speeds, deformation ratios, and other manufacturing parameters. Clearly, tool coatings are one of the key aspects in the final performance of many cutting and stamping tools used in high added value sectors. In fact, new improved coating products used on a large variety of cutting and forming processes are being regularly launched at the largest manufacturing and engineering trade shows around the globe.

Consequently, research and innovation on tailored-made thin films and coatings, which can dramatically improve tool life and reduce tool wear due to their superior surface properties, is of primary importance to the global manufacturing sector. The recipes for new tool coating generations usually introduce layers with innovative compositions containing multiple chemical elements, multi- and nano-layers and nanocomposite structures based on nanocrystalline grains embedded into amorphous matrixes. Studies related to coating adhesion to substrates, internal stresses, erosion, and surface fatigue behavior are also topics of great importance to this sector.

In particular, the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Hard coatings for cutting tools, end mills, inserts, drill bits, taps, and others.
  • Coatings that can increase tool life through the reduction of friction on punches, molds, and dies.
  • Coating deposition technology for tool steels (cold/hot work steel, high-speed steels, HSS, HSCO, M42, etc.) and cemented carbides.
  • Coatings performance under heavy-duty conditions, experiments showing the influence of coatings on tool life and process performance.
  • Pre- and post-treatments of tool/piece surfaces to achieve a better adhesion and surface finish. Drag grinding, blasting, chemical processes, which can be as important as the coating structure itself.
  • Tribology of coatings in manufacturing processes.
  • Coatings and surfaces for high-precision applications.
  • Diamond-like carbon coatings.
  • PVD and CVD techniques: equipment, technology, and control.
  • Examples of good practices of manufacturing processes in which hard coatings make a significant difference.

Prof. Dr. Luis Norberto López de Lacalle
Prof. Dr. Jose Luis Endrino
Prof. Dr. Adriano Fagali de Souza
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Experimental Study on Tool Wear and Delamination in Milling CFRPs with TiAlN- and TiN-Coated Tools
Coatings 2020, 10(7), 623; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10070623 - 29 Jun 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have very good mechanical properties, such as extremely high tensile strength/weight ratios, tensile modulus/weight ratios, and high strengths. CFRP composites need to be machined with a suitable cutting tool; otherwise, the machining quality may be reduced, and failures often [...] Read more.
Carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRPs) have very good mechanical properties, such as extremely high tensile strength/weight ratios, tensile modulus/weight ratios, and high strengths. CFRP composites need to be machined with a suitable cutting tool; otherwise, the machining quality may be reduced, and failures often occur. However, as a result of the high hardness and low thermal conductivity of CFRPs, the cutting tools used in the milling process of these materials complete their lifetime in a short cycle, due to especially abrasive wear and related failure mechanisms. As a result of tool wear, some problems, such as delamination, fiber breakage, uncut fiber and thermal damage, emerge in CFRP composite under working conditions. As one of the main failure mechanisms emerging in the milling of CFRPs, delamination is primarily affected by the cutting tool material and geometry, machining parameters, and the dynamic loads arising during the machining process. Dynamic loads can lead to the breakage and/or wear of cutting tools in the milling of difficult-to-machine CFRPs. The present research was carried out to understand the influence of different machining parameters on tool abrasion, and the work piece damage mechanisms during CFRP milling are experimentally investigated. For this purpose, cutting tests were carried out using a (Physical Vapor Deposition) PVD-coated single layer TiAlN and TiN carbide tool, and the abrasion behavior of the coated tool was investigated under dry machining. To understand the wear process, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used. As a result of the experiments, it was determined that the hard and abrasive structure of the carbon fibers caused flank wear on TiAlN- and TiN-coated cutting tools. The best machining parameters in terms of the delamination damage of the CFRP composite were obtained at high cutting speeds and low feed rates. It was found that the higher wear values were observed at the TiAlN-coated tool, at the feed rate of 0.05 mm/tooth. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Cutting and Stamping Tools: Recent Advances)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Facilitating TiB2 for Filtered Vacuum Cathodic Arc Evaporation
Coatings 2020, 10(3), 244; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10030244 - 06 Mar 2020
Abstract
TiB2 is well established as a superhard coating with a high melting point and a low coefficient of friction. The brittle nature of borides means they cannot be utilised with arc evaporation, which is commonly used for the synthesis of hard coatings [...] Read more.
TiB2 is well established as a superhard coating with a high melting point and a low coefficient of friction. The brittle nature of borides means they cannot be utilised with arc evaporation, which is commonly used for the synthesis of hard coatings as it provides a high deposition rate, fully ionised plasma and good adhesion. In this work, TiB2 conical cathodes with non-standard sintering additives (carbon and TiSi2) were produced, and the properties of the base material, such as grain structure, hardness, electrical resistivity and composition, were compared to those of monolithic TiB2. The dependence of the produced cathodes’ electrical resistivity on temperature was evaluated in a furnace with an argon atmosphere. Their arc–evaporation suitability was assessed in terms of arc mobility and stability by visual inspection and by measurements of plasma electrical potential. In addition, shaping the cathode into a cone allowed investigation of the influence of an axial magnetic field on the arc spot. The produced cathodes have a bulk hardness of 23–24 GPa. It has been found that adding 1 wt% of C ensured exceptional arc-spot stability and mobility, and requires lower arc current compared to monolithic TiB2. However, poor cathode utilization has been achieved due to the steady generation of cathode flakes. The TiB2 cathode containing 5 wt% of TiSi2 provided the best balance between arc-spot behaviour and cathode utilisation. Preventing cathode overheating has been identified as a main factor to allow high deposition rate (±1.2 µm/h) from TiB2-C and TiB2-TiSi2 cathodes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Cutting and Stamping Tools: Recent Advances)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Ceramics Coatings Processed by Sol-Gel for Cutting Tools
Coatings 2019, 9(11), 755; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9110755 - 14 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In order to obtain better cutting tool performance, the coatings appear as an alternative in the machining process. The goal of the coating is to improve tribological conditions in the chip-tool and tool-workpiece interfaces. On the other hand, the use of coated tools [...] Read more.
In order to obtain better cutting tool performance, the coatings appear as an alternative in the machining process. The goal of the coating is to improve tribological conditions in the chip-tool and tool-workpiece interfaces. On the other hand, the use of coated tools decreases the wear of the tools. This study discusses the ceramic coatings characterization deposited in WC tools. The Al2O3 and TiO2 films present properties such as thermal stability, chemical inertia, high hardness, and good mechanical properties. These coatings were prepared by sol-gel technology. The results indicated that the multilayer coating presents better adhesion on the substrate. Moreover, lower coefficients of friction were found for the coated tools. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate the influence of the cutting parameters and tool coating on the cutting force. The lower cutting force was obtained using the multilayer-coated tool. Thus, the sol-gel method appears as a novel technique to deposit coating in the WC tools to improve their performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Coatings for Cutting and Stamping Tools: Recent Advances)
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