Special Issue "Bioactive Surfaces and Coatings for Bone Regeneration"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Surface Coatings for Biomedicine and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Roman Perez Antoñanzas
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Guest Editor
Bioengineering Institute of Tehcnology, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, C/ Immaculada, 22 08017 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: biomaterials; tissue engineering; bioactive ceramics; drug delivery; cell delivery; functionalization; bone regeneration
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Mireia Hoyos
Website
Guest Editor
Bioengineering Institute of Technology, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: biomaterials; tissue engineering; bioactive metals; antibacterial coatings; functionalization; bone regeneration; biosensing platforms
Dr. Luis M. Delgado
Website
Guest Editor
Bioengineering Institute of Technology, Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: biomaterials; tissue engineering; inflammatory response; 3D printing; biopolymers; drug delivery; macrophage polarization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Bone regeneration is nowadays bounded to the use of biomaterials that are able to promote tissue regeneration and to degrade after their function has been performed. These biomaterials need to be designed to attract a sufficient number of cells to the site of defect, to regulate the inflammatory response, to induce blood vessel formation, and to finally allow bone cell maturation. It is an orchestrated process that involves a series of events, which are initiated by cell–material interactions followed by cell–molecule interactions that will ultimately dictate the success of the implanted biomaterial. Once implanted, cells need to adapt to the surface of the biomaterial to stimulate the different biological processes, which are tuned by the intrinsic properties of the substrate. After the initial cell–material interaction, cells undergo a series of events in which their phenotype changes into bone tissue lineages. Furthermore, cells are continuously provided with signaling molecules that guide the final tissue regeneration.

This Special Issue focuses on the development of bone regenerative strategies based on the design of materials that provide a bioactive surface. Furthermore, the Special Issue also includes coatings that may tune the properties of the biomaterial and provide, thus, signaling molecules that are required to stimulate bone tissue regeneration.

In particular, the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Nano- and mesoporous based materials;
  • Surface functionalization strategies;
  • Molecule and/or ion releasing coatings;
  • Surface modification techniques, including etching or plasma treatment, among others;
  • Bioactive ceramic coatings on polymers and substrates.

Dr. Román Pérez
Dr. Mireia Hoyos
Dr. Luis M. Delgado
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Vertical Guided Bone Augmentation Using Titanium Mesh Domes Coated with Natural Latex Extracted from Hevea brasiliensis
Coatings 2020, 10(6), 595; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10060595 - 25 Jun 2020
Abstract
The subject of this work is the evaluation of the use of titanium mesh domes coated with latex extracted from Hevea brasiliensis to promote vertical guided bone augmentation (GBA), above the normal limits of the skeleton. Twenty-four New Zealand rabbits were used, in [...] Read more.
The subject of this work is the evaluation of the use of titanium mesh domes coated with latex extracted from Hevea brasiliensis to promote vertical guided bone augmentation (GBA), above the normal limits of the skeleton. Twenty-four New Zealand rabbits were used, in which a circular groove of eight millimeters in diameter and nine holes in the internal region reaching the medulla were made with a trephine drill, in the calvaria. The dome, four millimeters in height, was fixed above this defect. The animals were divided into four groups (N = 6). The first (control) received a titanium dome not covered by the periosteum, and the second received a titanium dome that was covered by the periosteum. For the third, a dome with a latex coating was used and was not covered by the periosteum, and for the fourth, a titanium dome with a latex coating was used and was covered by the periosteum. After 90 days, the animals were euthanized. Computerized tomography imaging demonstrated that vertical bone augmentation was achieved in the groups with titanium domes coated with latex. Microscopic evaluation showed that there were no differences between the control group and Group 2, or between Groups 3 and 4. The other comparisons showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05, ANOVA-Tukey). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Surfaces and Coatings for Bone Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle
Surface Modification of the Ti-6Al-4V Alloy by Anodic Oxidation and Its Effect on Osteoarticular Cell Proliferation
Coatings 2020, 10(5), 491; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10050491 - 20 May 2020
Abstract
This investigation describes the formation of crystalline nanotubes of titanium oxide on the surface of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy and its biological evaluation. The formation of nanotubes was performed by the anodic oxidation technique with a constant work potential of 60 V but with [...] Read more.
This investigation describes the formation of crystalline nanotubes of titanium oxide on the surface of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy and its biological evaluation. The formation of nanotubes was performed by the anodic oxidation technique with a constant work potential of 60 V but with different anodizing times of 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min used to evaluate their effects on the characteristics of the nanotubes and their biological activity. A mixture of ethylene glycol, water, and ammonium fluoride (NH4F) was used as the electrolytic fluid. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were applied to determine the morphology and crystalline nature of the nanotubes, showing a well-defined matrix of nanotubes of titanium oxide with a crystalline structure and a diameter in the range of 52.5 ± 5.13 to 95 ± 11.92 nm. In contrast, the XRD patterns showed an increase of defined peaks that directly correlated with treatment times. Moreover, in vitro assays using an innovative cell culture device demonstrated that the inner diameter of the nanotubes directly correlated with cell proliferation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Surfaces and Coatings for Bone Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle
Performance on Bone Regeneration of a Silver Nanoparticle Delivery System Based on Natural Rubber Membrane NRL-AgNP
Coatings 2020, 10(4), 323; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10040323 - 28 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
NRL-AgNP was developed bringing important properties of natural rubber as occlusive membrane with antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. Biological aspects, such as cell viability, tissue reaction, and occlusive membrane performance of NRL-AgNP, are presented. In addition, in vivo degradation was investigated by Fourier [...] Read more.
NRL-AgNP was developed bringing important properties of natural rubber as occlusive membrane with antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles. Biological aspects, such as cell viability, tissue reaction, and occlusive membrane performance of NRL-AgNP, are presented. In addition, in vivo degradation was investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The cell viability test was performed in mesenchymal stem cells of human deciduous dental pulp seeded with the new material. Tissue reaction was tested through subcutaneous implant of NRL-AgNP and compared to Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) at the dorsum of rats. The performance of the NRL-AgNP as an occlusive membrane in Guided Bone Regeneration (GBR) was tested in full thickness critical size bone defects (8 mm) in rat calvaria. Cell viability was 98.8% for NRL-AgNP and did not result in statistically significant differences compared to negative control (p > 0.05 Kruskal–Wallis). All materials presented similar tissue reaction (p > 0.05). In the GBR experiment, the defects covered with NRL-AgNP presented a more advanced stage of bone regeneration in comparison with non-treated defects. The FTIR spectra of NRL-AgNP before and after implantation showed no degradation of NRL-AgNP membranes. These results are in favor of the NRL-AgNP use as an occlusive membrane for GBR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Surfaces and Coatings for Bone Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of the Origin and Deacetylation Degree of Chitosan on Properties of Its Coatings on Titanium
Coatings 2020, 10(2), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10020099 - 23 Jan 2020
Abstract
The properties of chitosan coatings on titanium surfaces may be influenced by a variety of factors, including their chemical characteristics and the deposition method. The aim of this research was to determine the influence of a chitosan’s origin (a type of shrimp) and [...] Read more.
The properties of chitosan coatings on titanium surfaces may be influenced by a variety of factors, including their chemical characteristics and the deposition method. The aim of this research was to determine the influence of a chitosan’s origin (a type of shrimp) and deacetylation degree (DD), when deposited on a very smooth titanium surface, on adhesion and biological behavior. The tests were performed using chitosan of a degree of 87% or 84% of deacetylation and that originated from armor crabs or shrimp armor. The technology of fabrication of chitosan coatings was by surface polishing to a smooth surface, oxidation in air, and immersion in a chitosan solution. The surface topographies were analyzed with an atomic force microscope and their water contact angles were measured by a falling drop method with a goniometer. The bioactivity tests were done in in vitro on osteogenic cells, type MC3T3-E1, with a biological microscope. The abrasion of the coatings was examined using a nano tribotester. The obtained results revealed that the adhesion of the coatings onto a smooth, oxidized titanium surface is appropriate as they remain sufficiently adjacent to the surface after wear tests. The source of chitin has a significant influence on biological properties, and the deacetylation degree is much less critical. The performed tests demonstrated the crucial role that the source of chitosan and the applicability of the applied surface treatment play in the preparation of chitosan coatings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Surfaces and Coatings for Bone Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle
Shear Bond Strength of Nanohybrid Composite to Biodentine with Three Different Adhesives
Coatings 2019, 9(12), 783; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9120783 - 22 Nov 2019
Abstract
Biodentine® is a bioactive dentin coating widely used for dental restoration; however, its adhesion to the substrate could limit its clinical success. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) between Biodentine® and a composite resin, [...] Read more.
Biodentine® is a bioactive dentin coating widely used for dental restoration; however, its adhesion to the substrate could limit its clinical success. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) between Biodentine® and a composite resin, using different types of adhesive. In total, 120 acrylic blocks with a central hole were prepared. They were fully filled with Biodentine®, and divided into two time groups: 12 min (n = 60) and 24 h (n = 60); each group was subdivided into four groups according to the adhesive: three-step etch and rinse (3-E&R) (n = 15), two-step etch and rinse (n = 15), and a universal adhesive subdivided into two groups, two-step etch and rinse (n = 15) and one-step self-etch adhesive system (n = 15). After adhesive application, the composite was applied and stored at 100% humidity, at 37 °C, for 24 h, before the SBS test. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, Fisher post hoc test, and Kolmogorov–Smirnov test. The 12-min group showed statistically significant differences (p = 0.009), with the highest values of adhesion for 3-E&R. No statistically significant differences were observed for the 24-h group (p = 0.813) and between adhesive systems (p = 0.071) regardless of adhesion time. Higher adhesion values were found at 24 h. It is essential to consider the longest setting time for Biodentine®. In terms of adhesive, 3-E&R had the highest adhesion values. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Surfaces and Coatings for Bone Regeneration)
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Surface Pre-Treatments on the Formation and Degradation Behaviour of a Calcium Phosphate Coating on Pure Magnesium
Coatings 2019, 9(4), 259; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9040259 - 18 Apr 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Calcium phosphate (CaPh) coatings are considered promising surface treatments for Mg-based implants. Normally, the phase conversion process of CaPh compounds occurs during immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and allows the easy penetration of a corrosive medium. To solve the issue, pre-treatment is [...] Read more.
Calcium phosphate (CaPh) coatings are considered promising surface treatments for Mg-based implants. Normally, the phase conversion process of CaPh compounds occurs during immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and allows the easy penetration of a corrosive medium. To solve the issue, pre-treatment is often performed, creating an effective barrier that further improves the corrosion resistance of the underlying Mg. In the present work three pre-treatments including hydrothermal treatment, anodization, and plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) were performed on pure Mg prior to CaPh deposition. Results indicated that the composition, morphology, and thickness of the CaPh coatings were strongly influenced by the pre-treatments. Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was formed on PEO surface, whilst DCPD and hydroxyapatite (HA) were deposited on hydrothermally prepared and anodized surfaces. HA could be deposited on the studied samples during immersion in SBF. The electrochemical impedance spectrum indicated that CaPh coating combined with PEO pre-treatment had the highest corrosion resistance at 120 h due to the superior barrier properties conferred by the PEO layer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Surfaces and Coatings for Bone Regeneration)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

planned paper 1

Title: Shear bond strength of nanohybrid composite to Biodentine with three different adhesives

Authors: V. Carretero, L. Giner, L. Peñate, M. Arregui

Affiliation: Universitat Internacional de Catalunya, School of Dentistry, Sant Cugat, Spain

Abstract: Biodentine is a bioactive dentin coating widely used for dental restoration; however, its adhesion to the substrate could limit its clinical exit. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) between Biodentine® and a composite resin, using different types of adhesive systems. A hundred and twenty acrylic blocks with a central hole were prepared. Those were fully filled with Biodentine®. Blocks were divided in two time groups: 12 minutes (n=60) and 24 hours (n=60), and each group was subdivided in four groups according to the adhesive: 3-steps etch- and-rinse (n=15) (Optibond FL), 2- steps etch-and-rinse (n=15) (Solobond M), and a universal adhesive subdivided in two groups, 2-steps etch-and-rinse (n=15) and 1-step self-etch adhesive system (n=15) (Scotchbond Universal). After the application of adhesive, composite was applied and stored at 100% humidity, at 37oC, for 24 hours, before SBS test. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, Fisher post-hoc test, and Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Twelve minutes group showed statistically significant differences (p=0.009), with the highest values of adhesion for Optibond FL. No statistically significant differences were observed at 24 hours group (p=0.813) and between adhesive systems (p=0.071) regardless of adhesion time. The higher adhesion values were found at 24 hours. It is essential to consider the longest setting time for Biodentine®. 3-steps etch and rinse adhesive has the highest adhesion values.

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