Special Issue "Advanced Nondestructive Evaluation and Characterization of Surface"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 April 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Youn ho Cho

School of Mechancial Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735, Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ultrasonic guided wave; nondestructive evaluation; nonlinear ultrasonic NDT
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Weibin Li

School of Aerospace Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, China
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nonlinear acoustics; guided wave; material characterization

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is an interdisciplinary field, which has been developed rapidly over recent decades as an important tool for damage detection, quality assessement and material characterization. Initiation and progression of degradation or cracks generally occurs on the surface of industrial components. This Special issue of Coatings is poised to collect original scientific or technical research articles and review papers relaed to advanced nondestructive evaluation and characterization of surfaces in solid structures. Especially, novel theoretical and experimental appraochs, with improved sensitivity, characterization capability, and efficiency of measurement, are of interest.

In particular, the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Surface waves based nondestructive evaluation

  • Surface cracks detection

  • Characterization of surface properties

  • Online monitoring of structural surface

Prof. Dr. Youn ho Cho
Prof. Dr. Weibin Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Analysis of Linear Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation Methods for Thin-Walled Structure Inspection Using Ultrasonic Array
Coatings 2019, 9(2), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9020146
Received: 20 January 2019 / Revised: 16 February 2019 / Accepted: 18 February 2019 / Published: 22 February 2019
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Abstract
The ultrasonic array used for thin-walled structure non-destructive inspection usually has a high central frequency so that the thickness-to-acoustic wavelength ratio is greater than 10. When the ratio is much smaller than 10, the reliability of the conventional ultrasonic array method will dramatically [...] Read more.
The ultrasonic array used for thin-walled structure non-destructive inspection usually has a high central frequency so that the thickness-to-acoustic wavelength ratio is greater than 10. When the ratio is much smaller than 10, the reliability of the conventional ultrasonic array method will dramatically decrease due to the influence of the acoustic near-field. This situation is unavoidable since the available central frequency of the array transducer cannot be an arbitrarily large value. To optimize the inspection performance in this case, the testing of an ultrasonic array and the evaluation of a structure whose thickness is smaller than five-times the longitudinal wavelength are analyzed in this paper. Linear ultrasonic array methods using different combinations of wave patterns, reflection times, and coupling conditions are uniformly expressed as full matrix algorithms. Simulated and experimental full matrices of 6 mm-thick aluminum plates using a 5-MHz array transducer are captured to analyze their imaging performances and sizing abilities with respect to various defects. Analyses show that the inspection results of the wedge coupling method have a much higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than the results of conventional direct contact methods. Circular defects and rectangular defects can be distinguished by comparing the imaging results of different modes. For the simulated circular defect, the diameter can be measured according to the maximum image amplitude of the defect. To simulate a rectangular defect located in the lower half of the region, the nominal length can be measured using a linear function whose input is a −6 dB drop in length of the SS-S mode image. For a real sample, the material anisotropy and complex self-reflections will decrease the SNR by about 10 dB. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nondestructive Evaluation and Characterization of Surface)
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Open AccessArticle Application of Industrial XRF Coating Thickness Analyzer for Phosphate Coating Thickness on Steel
Coatings 2018, 8(4), 126; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8040126
Received: 6 February 2018 / Revised: 22 March 2018 / Accepted: 26 March 2018 / Published: 30 March 2018
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Abstract
The results of industrial application of an online X-ray fluorescence coating thickness analyzer for measuring the thickness of phosphate coatings on moving steel strips are considered in the article. The target range of coating thickness to be measured is from tens to hundreds [...] Read more.
The results of industrial application of an online X-ray fluorescence coating thickness analyzer for measuring the thickness of phosphate coatings on moving steel strips are considered in the article. The target range of coating thickness to be measured is from tens to hundreds of mg/m2 in a measurement time of 10 s. The measurement accuracy observed during long-duration factory acceptance test was 10–15%. The coating thickness analyzer consists of two XRF gauges, mounted above and below the steel strip and capable of moving across the moving strip system for their suspension and relocation and electronic control unit. Fully automated software was developed to automatically and continuously (24/7) control both gauges, scanning both sides of the steel strip, and develop and test methods for measuring new coatings. It allows performing offline storage and retrieval of the measurement results, remotely controlling the analyzer components and measurement modes from a control room. The developed XRF coating thickness analyzer can also be used for real-time measurement of other types of coatings, both metallic and non-metallic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nondestructive Evaluation and Characterization of Surface)
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Open AccessArticle New Method to Identify Field Joint Coating Failures Based on MFL In-Line Inspection Signals
Received: 6 January 2018 / Revised: 8 February 2018 / Accepted: 24 February 2018 / Published: 27 February 2018
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Abstract
Above ground indirect detections and random excavations that have applied the past years for buried long distance oil and gas pipelines can only identify some damaged coating locations. Hence, large number of field joint coating (FJC) failures happen unconsciously until they lead to [...] Read more.
Above ground indirect detections and random excavations that have applied the past years for buried long distance oil and gas pipelines can only identify some damaged coating locations. Hence, large number of field joint coating (FJC) failures happen unconsciously until they lead to failures of the pipelines. Based on the analysis of magnetic flux leakage (MFL) in-line inspection (ILI) signals, combined with the statistical results of 414 excavations from two different pipeline sections, a new method to identify the failed FJC is established. Though it can only identify FJC failures when there are signs of corrosion on pipe body, it is much more efficient and cost-saving. The concluded identification rule still needs more validations and improvements to be more applicable and accuracy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nondestructive Evaluation and Characterization of Surface)
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Open AccessArticle Effects of the Oxide Coating Thickness on the Small Flaw Sizing Using an Ultrasonic Test Technique
Received: 26 December 2017 / Revised: 29 January 2018 / Accepted: 7 February 2018 / Published: 9 February 2018
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Abstract
When magnesium alloys are tested using ultrasonic techniques, their oxide coating will affect the transmitted ultrasonic energy and the accuracy of the flaw sizing. In this work, the effects of the coating thickness on the flaw sizing are investigated. An ultrasonic measurement model [...] Read more.
When magnesium alloys are tested using ultrasonic techniques, their oxide coating will affect the transmitted ultrasonic energy and the accuracy of the flaw sizing. In this work, the effects of the coating thickness on the flaw sizing are investigated. An ultrasonic measurement model is employed to predict the flaw response signal, and the reflected and transmitted ultrasonic energy in the coated surface are corrected by modifying the reflection and transmission coefficients related to the effects of the coating thickness. The effectiveness of these coefficients and the ultrasonic measurement model are verified through experiments. With the correction of the coating thickness effects, the flaw-sizing curves predicted using the ultrasonic measurement model are provided. The flaws in magnesium alloy specimens with different coating thicknesses are tested, and the determined flaw sizes from these curves agree well with the actual sizes, which reveals the effectiveness of the proposed work. This work provides an effective tool to improve the flaw sizing performance using ultrasonic techniques in practical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Nondestructive Evaluation and Characterization of Surface)
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