Special Issue "Erosion of Nanostructured Coatings"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Corrosion, Wear and Erosion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 June 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Alicja Krella
Website
Guest Editor
The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow MachineryPolish Academy of Sciencesul. Fiszera 14, 80-231 Gdansk, Poland
Interests: thin films and nanotechnology; materials processing; thin film deposition; failure analysis; thin films; materials engineering; coating; surface engineering; surface science; steel; coating technology; surface coating; surface analysis; nanoindentation; coatings science; deposition coating; pvd coating; physical vapor deposition (PVD)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanostructured materials have been developed for the last few decades, and the unique properties of these materials contribute to the great attention they have received. Nanostructured coatings are now used for many tribological applications, e.g., as anti-wear coatings in bearings, for abrasive wear elements in the automobile and aircrafts industry, as a wear protection coating for high-speed cutting tools, as well as in thermal barrier coatings (TBC) in hot sections of gas turbines, rockets, and space vehicles, and in devices in renewable energy systems. Due to the risk of dynamic loading in these applications, the erosion resistance of these coatings should be investigated. Cavitation degradation is the most undesirable due to the action of dynamic pulses with amplitude up to few GPa, and their duration up to a few ms, or even s. The cavitation erosion resistance of these coatings depends on their structure, including defects and properties, the properties of the substrate material, as well as the cavitation intensity.

The scope of this Special Issue will serve as a forum for papers on the following concepts:

  • Degradation of nanostructured coatings caused by reapeted impacts;
  • Cavitation erosion resistance of monolayer coating;
  • Cavitation erosion resistance of multilayer coatings;
  • The role of coating defects on cavitation degradation;
  • The role of coating structure on cavitation resistance;
  • Influence of cavitation intensity on degradation of nanostructured coating;
  • Cavitation–corrosion resistance of nanostructured coating;
  • Cavitation–slurry erosion reistance of nanostructured coating;
  • Influence of solid particle impact velocity on eroson resistance of nanostructured coating;
  • Degradation nanostructured coating caused by solid particle impacts.

Prof. Dr. Alicja Krella
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Monolayer PVD coating
  • Multilayer PVD coating
  • CVD coating
  • Plasma-assisted coatings
  • Antiwear coatings
  • Cavitation erosion resistance
  • Slurry resistance

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Experimental Study of the Influence of Deposition of Multilayer CrN/CrCN PVD Coating on Austenitic Steel on Resistance to Cavitation Erosion
Coatings 2020, 10(5), 487; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10050487 - 19 May 2020
Cited by 6
Abstract
The impact of deposition of multilayer CrN/CrCN coating on X6CrNiTi18-10 steel by means of the PVD (physical vapour deposition) method on resistance to cavitation erosion has been investigated. Cavitation tests were performed using a cavitation chamber with a barricade system at the inlet [...] Read more.
The impact of deposition of multilayer CrN/CrCN coating on X6CrNiTi18-10 steel by means of the PVD (physical vapour deposition) method on resistance to cavitation erosion has been investigated. Cavitation tests were performed using a cavitation chamber with a barricade system at the inlet pressure p1 = 600 kPa and the outlet pressure p2 = 123 kPa. Deposition of CrN/CrCN coating allowed increasing duration of the incubation period and decreasing cumulative volume loss until 500 min of exposure. The erosion of the CrN/CrCN–X6CrNiTi18-10 system begins with the removal of microdroplets from the coating surface and surface undulation. The surface undulation increases with the exposure time leading to coating fracture in a brittle mode. Initiation sites of cracks were located inside the PVD coating. Measurements of surface roughness illustrate uneven degradation of the exposed surface and the location of slight and severe erosion zones. The Ra parameters obtained for the CrN/CrCN–X6CrNiTi18-10 system and X6CrNiTi18-10 steel after 180 min of erosion were comparable. An elongation of erosion test up to 600 min resulted in a higher increase in surface roughness of the CrN/CrCN coating–X6CrNiTi18-10 steel system in comparison to that of X6CrNiTi18-10 steel. With increasing exposition time, the rate of increase of the surface roughness decreased due to overlapping damage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Erosion of Nanostructured Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle
Damage Assessment and Fracture Resistance of Functionally Graded Advanced Thermal Barrier Coating Systems: Experimental and Analytical Modeling Approach
Coatings 2020, 10(5), 474; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10050474 - 14 May 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Enhancement of stability, durability, and performance of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems providing thermal insulation to aero-propulsion hot-section components is a pressing industrial need. An experimental program was undertaken with thermally cycled eight wt.% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) TBC to examine the progressive [...] Read more.
Enhancement of stability, durability, and performance of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems providing thermal insulation to aero-propulsion hot-section components is a pressing industrial need. An experimental program was undertaken with thermally cycled eight wt.% yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) TBC to examine the progressive and sequential physical damage and coating failure. A linear relation for parameterized thermally grown oxide (TGO) growth rate and crack length was evident when plotted against parameterized thermal cycling up to 430 cycles. An exponential function thereafter with the thermal cycling observed irrespective of coating processing. A phenomenological model for the TBC delamination is proposed based on TGO initiation, growth, and profile changes. An isostrain-based simplistic fracture mechanical model is presented and simulations carried out for functionally graded (FG) TBC systems to analyze the cracking instability and fracture resistance. A few realistic FG TBCs architectures were considered, exploiting the compositional, dimensional, and other parameters for simulations using the model. Normalized stress intensity factor, K1/K0 as an effective design parameter in evaluating the fracture resistance of the interfaces is proposed. The elastic modulus difference between adjacent FG layers showed stronger influence on K1/K0 than the layer thickness. Two advanced and promising TBC materials were also taken into consideration, namely gadolinium zirconate and lanthanum zirconate. Fracture resistance of both double layer and trilayer hybrid architectures were also simulated and analyzed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Erosion of Nanostructured Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle
Attempts to Improve the Subsurface Properties of Horizontally-Formed Cementitious Composites Using Tin(II) Fluoride Nanoparticles
Coatings 2020, 10(1), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10010083 - 19 Jan 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
This article presents studies that were performed in order to improve the subsurface properties of horizontally-formed cementitious composites using tin(II) fluoride nanoparticles. The main aim of the study was to solve the problem of the decrease in subsurface properties caused by mortar bleeding [...] Read more.
This article presents studies that were performed in order to improve the subsurface properties of horizontally-formed cementitious composites using tin(II) fluoride nanoparticles. The main aim of the study was to solve the problem of the decrease in subsurface properties caused by mortar bleeding and the segregation of the aggregate along the height of the overlay. The article also aims to highlight the patch grabbing difficulties that occur during the process of forming horizontally-formed cementitious composites. Four specimens were analyzed: one reference sample and three samples modified with the addition of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5% of tin(II) fluoride nanoparticles in relation to the cement mass. To analyze the mechanical properties of the specimens, non-destructive (ultrasonic pulse velocity) and destructive tests (flexural tensile strength, compressive strength, abrasion resistance, pull-off strength) were performed. It was indicated that due to the addition of the tin(II) fluoride, it was possible to enhance the subsurface tensile strength and abrasion resistance of the tested cementitious composites. To confirm the obtained macroscopic results, the porosity of the subsurface was measured using SEM. It was also shown that the addition of the tin(II) fluoride nanoparticles did not reduce its flexural and compressive strength. The results show that horizontally-formed cementitious composites with the addition of 1.0% of tin(II) fluoride nanoparticles in relation to the cement mass obtained the most effective mechanical performance, especially with regard to subsurface properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Erosion of Nanostructured Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle
Key Problems Affecting the Anti-Erosion Coating Performance of Aero-Engine Compressor: A Review
Coatings 2019, 9(12), 821; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9120821 - 03 Dec 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Sand erosion has always been a key threat to the performance and service life of aero-engines. The compressor, the key component installed at the front of the aero-engine, suffers the most from sand erosion, especially compressors serving in deserts. Ceramic hard coating is [...] Read more.
Sand erosion has always been a key threat to the performance and service life of aero-engines. The compressor, the key component installed at the front of the aero-engine, suffers the most from sand erosion, especially compressors serving in deserts. Ceramic hard coating is a traditional way to improve the hardness and wear resistance of cutting and grinding tools. It may also be used to improve the erosion resistance of aero- engine compressor. However, the mechanism of erosion damage is complicated, which may include wear, secondary erosion, anisotropic erosion, impact, and fatigue. Recent research discovered the major problems with ceramic hard coating on aero-engine compressors. In this paper, these following problems are discussed: the design of coating material and structure, the preparation method and technology, the effects of droplets and clusters of coating surface, microstructure and characteristics of interface. The review of the major problems and possible solutions discussed in this paper may contribute to the future research on erosion coating theoretically and practically. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Erosion of Nanostructured Coatings)
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Open AccessArticle
Study on the Damage Mechanism of TiN/Ti Coatings Based on Multi-Directional Impact
Coatings 2019, 9(11), 765; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9110765 - 18 Nov 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
TiN/Ti coatings have great application potential in improving aero-engine server lives in a dusty environment. However, the damage behavior and mechanism of the coating and substrate under high impact speed and multi-direction loading conditions has scarcely been investigated. In this paper, TiN/Ti coatings [...] Read more.
TiN/Ti coatings have great application potential in improving aero-engine server lives in a dusty environment. However, the damage behavior and mechanism of the coating and substrate under high impact speed and multi-direction loading conditions has scarcely been investigated. In this paper, TiN/Ti coatings were deposited on Ti6Al4V alloys by a magnetic filter cathode vacuum arc. Multi-directional impact tests were carried out by a gas gun system at, 45°, 60°, and 90° with a velocity of 330 m/s. The damage behaviors and mechanisms of the TiN/Ti coatings were investigated and revealed by researching the damage morphology, crack propagation, and stress distribution. The results show that plastic deformation occurs both in the coatings and the substrates under high speed impacting. Cracks extend vertically downward in the TiN layer first and are deflected at the Ti layer when the driving force is not enough. Circular cracks and radical cracks are found to form network cracks on the surface of the coating and the shear stress loaded by the particles, which drives cracks’ propagation is the main reason for the peeling off on the coatings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Erosion of Nanostructured Coatings)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Resistance of PVD Coatings to Erosive and Wear Processes: A Review
Coatings 2020, 10(10), 921; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10100921 - 25 Sep 2020
Abstract
Due to the increasing maintenance costs of hydraulic machines related to the damages caused by cavitation erosion and/or erosion of solid particles, as well as in tribological connections, surface protection of these components is very important. Up to now, numerous investigations of resistance [...] Read more.
Due to the increasing maintenance costs of hydraulic machines related to the damages caused by cavitation erosion and/or erosion of solid particles, as well as in tribological connections, surface protection of these components is very important. Up to now, numerous investigations of resistance of coatings, mainly nitride coatings, such as CrN, TiN, TiCN, (Ti,Cr)N coatings and multilayer TiN/Ti, ZrN/CrN and TN/(Ti,Al)N coatings, produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD) method using different techniques of deposition, such as magnetron sputtering, arc evaporation or ion plating, to cavitation erosion, solid particle erosion and wear have been made. The results of these investigations, degradation processes and main test devices used are presented in this paper. An effect of deposition of mono- and multi-layer PVD coatings on duration of incubation period, cumulative weight loss and erosion rate, as well as on wear rate and coefficient of friction in tribological tests is discussed. It is shown that PVD coating does not always provide extended incubation time and/or improved resistance to mentioned types of damage. The influence of structure, hardness, residence to plastic deformation and stresses in the coatings on erosion and wear resistance is discussed. In the case of cavitation erosion and solid particle erosion, a limit value of the ratio of hardness (H) to Young’s modulus (E) exists at which the best resistance is gained. In the case of tribological tests, the higher the H/E ratio and the lower the coefficient of friction, the lower the wear rate, but there are also many exceptions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Erosion of Nanostructured Coatings)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Planned paper 1:

Key Problems Affecting The Anti-Erosion Coating Performance Of Aeroengine Compressor : A Review

Guangyu He, Danyang Sun, Jiao Chen, Xiao Han, Zhaolu Zhang, Zhihao Fang, Lingwei Yang, and Zhufang Yang

Planned paper 2:

Damage Mechanism Of Tin/Ti Coatings Based On Multi-Directional Impact

Jiao Chen

 

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