Special Issue "Ocean Warming, Acidification and Deoxygenation"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019) | Viewed by 3028

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Chris Langdon
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Marine Biology and Ecology, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, 4600 Rickenbacker Cswy, Miami, FL 33149, USA
Interests: impacts of warming and acidification on corals at the organismal level and on coral reefs at the community level

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oceanic warming, acidification and deoxygenation are beginning to change the ocean environment in ways that are going to impact the ability of the oceans to support the many services on which society depends, e.g., transportation, food and recreation, to name but a few. It is critical that these changes be well documented and understood. How do they vary regionally and temporally? What are the correlations between them and with important forcing factors, both natural and anthropogenic? How can this information best be presented in ways that will be useful to policy makers and managers? 

This Special Issue, "Ocean warming, acidification and deoxygenation", will call for submissions of papers that present the trends, share new ways of collecting the data and presenting the information in useful formats, expose the information gaps and suggest ways of addressing those gaps. Studies analyzing data from hydrographic surveys, moorings, drifters, remote sensing, monitoring networks, and field experiments are equally welcome.  Modelling studies looking at the impacts of warming, acidification and deoxygenation are also suitable. Review articles are also welcome.

Prof. Dr. Chris Langdon
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Ocean warming
  • ocean acidification
  • coastal acidification
  • regional studies
  • time series
  • deoxygenation
  • OMZ (oxygen minimum zone)
  • heat stress indices
  • metabolically available habitat

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
The Effect of Agulhas Eddies on Absorption and Transport of Anthropogenic Carbon in the South Atlantic Ocean
Climate 2019, 7(6), 84; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7060084 - 18 Jun 2019
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2755
Abstract
The South Atlantic Ocean is currently undergoing significant alterations due to climate change. This region is important to the global carbon cycle, but marine carbon data are scarce in this basin. Additionally, this region is influenced by Agulhas eddies. However, their effects on [...] Read more.
The South Atlantic Ocean is currently undergoing significant alterations due to climate change. This region is important to the global carbon cycle, but marine carbon data are scarce in this basin. Additionally, this region is influenced by Agulhas eddies. However, their effects on ocean biogeochemistry are not yet fully understood. Thus, we aimed to model the carbonate parameters in this region and investigate the anthropogenic carbon (Cant) content in 13 eddies shed by the Agulhas retroflection. We used in situ data from the CLIVAR/WOCE/A10 section to elaborate total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) and total alkalinity (AT) models and reconstruct those parameters using in situ data from two other Brazilian initiatives. Furthermore, we applied the Tracer combining Oxygen, inorganic Carbon, and total Alkalinity (TrOCA) method to calculate the Cant, focusing on the 13 identified Agulhas eddies. The CT and AT models presented root mean square errors less than 1.66 and 2.19 μmol kg−1, indicating Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network climate precision. The Cant content in the Agulhas eddies was 23% higher than that at the same depths of the surrounding waters. We observed that Agulhas eddies can play a role in the faster acidification of the South Atlantic Central Water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ocean Warming, Acidification and Deoxygenation)
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