Special Issue "Landscape and Climate Change"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Katja Trachte
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory for Climatology and Remote Sensing, Department of Geography, University of Marburg, Deutschhausstraße 10, 35037 Marburg, Germany
Interests: land surface–atmosphere interactions, boundary-layer processes, carbon and water cycles, orographic-induced cloud and precipitation dynamics, climate change in tropical mountainous areas

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The characteristics of landscapes and climate are strongly related through a direct exchange between the terrestrial and the atmospheric system. Alterations in these properties inevitably have consequences for the climate system. While changes in landscapes affect greenhouse gas emissions, which in turn contribute to global warming, changes in climate cause vegetation shifts along altitudinal and latitudinal gradients. Modifications in vegetation type compositions further feedback to the hydroclimatic system as well as to atmospheric processes that alter the regional and local climate with impacts on the socio-ecological system.

 

In this special issue, contributions that address one or more of the following topics are welcome:

  • direct and indirect effects of land use change, such as deforestation, agriculture, and urbanization;
  • impacts of climate change on eco-hydrological systems;
  • interactions and feedback effects between land surface and the atmospheric boundary-layer;
  • causal factors of changes in surface energy fluxes;
  • carbon and water cycles;
  • water recycling, evapotranspiration, and precipitation dynamics;
  • ecosystem services, natural resources, and water availability; and
  • sustainable management of forestry and land-use practices.

Dr. Katja Trachte
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Climate is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • land use change
  • landscape diversity
  • carbon and water cycles
  • surface energy fluxes
  • evapotranspiration
  • precipitation dynamics
  • ecosystem services
  • sustainable land use management

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Observed Mesoscale Hydroclimate Variability of North America’s Allegheny Mountains at 40.2° N
Climate 2019, 7(7), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7070091 - 18 Jul 2019
Abstract
Spatial hydroclimatic variability of Eastern North America’s Allegheny Mountain System (AMS) is commonly oversimplified to elevation differences and the rain-shadow effect. Descriptive and higher order statistical properties of hourly meteorological observations (1948–2017) from seven airports were analyzed to better understand AMS climatic complexity. [...] Read more.
Spatial hydroclimatic variability of Eastern North America’s Allegheny Mountain System (AMS) is commonly oversimplified to elevation differences and the rain-shadow effect. Descriptive and higher order statistical properties of hourly meteorological observations (1948–2017) from seven airports were analyzed to better understand AMS climatic complexity. Airports were located along a longitudinal transect (40.2 °N) and observation infrastructure was positioned to minimize climatic gradients associated with insolation, slope, and aspect. Results indicated average ambient temperature was well correlated with airport elevation (R2 = 0.97). However, elevation was relatively poorly correlated to dew point temperature (R2 = 0.80) and vapor pressure deficit (R2 = 0.61) heterogeneity. Skewness and kurtosis of ambient and dew point temperatures were negative at all airports indicating hourly values below the median were more common and extreme values were less common than a normal distribution implies. Westerly winds accounted for 54.5% of observations indicating prevailing winds misrepresented nearly half of AMS weather phenomena. The sum of maximum hourly precipitation rates was maximized in Philadelphia, PA implying a convective precipitation maximum near the border of Piedmont and Coastal Plain provinces. Results further indicate the AMS represents a barrier to omnidirectional moisture advection suggesting physiographic provinces are characterized by distinct evapotranspiration and precipitation regimes. The current work draws attention to observed mesoscale hydroclimatic heterogeneity of the AMS region and identifies mechanisms influencing local to regional water quantity and quality issues that are relevant to many locations globally. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Landscape and Climate Change)
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