Special Issue "Climate Change Impacts on Soil Processes and Ecosystem"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2022) | Viewed by 1304

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Xia Zhu-Barker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biogeochemistry and Nutrient Cycling Laboratory, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California Davis, CA 95616, USA
Interests: soil fertility; agricultural sustainability; greenhouse gas emissions; soil-plant relationships; N cycling and C sequestration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soils support all terrestrial life by provision and moderation of ecosystem functions and food and fiber production. Climate change may affect soil processes and therefore ecosystem functions and services on both short and long timescales. The future climate is projected to have changes in temperature and hydrology regimes with increasing frequency in extreme weather events, leading to potential shifts in land use type and intensifying the need for mitigation and adaptation strategies for agriculture. In recent years, land management practices such as cover crop, manure, compost and biochar, reduced tillage, and drip irrigation have been used to increase soil productivity and general soil health, as well as to enhance the sustainability and climate change resilience of ecosystems. However, the complex interactions between these management practices and soil processes, and the contribution of these interactions to climate change must be evaluated for how well they perform under present conditions and future climate analogs. This special issue welcomes studies on the drivers, mechanisms and significance of different soil processes as affected by land management and climate change, as well as the strategies to mitigate and adapt to a changing climate.

Dr. Xia Zhu-Barker
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Climate change
  • greenhouse gas emissions
  • nitrogen cycles
  • carbon sequestration
  • land management, soil processes, modeling, sustainability and resilience, ecosystem function and services

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Opportunity for GNSS Reflectometry in Sensing the Regional Climate and Soil Moisture Instabilities in Myanmar
Climate 2021, 9(12), 175; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli9120175 - 03 Dec 2021
Viewed by 899
Abstract
The climate crisis is happening globally, and the consequent process has revealed soil evolution and meteorological interactions. The GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R) technique recently encompassed sea surface monitoring, land changes, and snow sensing in addition to position, navigation, and timing. After the launch of [...] Read more.
The climate crisis is happening globally, and the consequent process has revealed soil evolution and meteorological interactions. The GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R) technique recently encompassed sea surface monitoring, land changes, and snow sensing in addition to position, navigation, and timing. After the launch of NASA’s eight CYGNSS satellites, spaceborne soil moisture retrieval has become more opportune in a global and regional investigation. The research carried out by the CYGNSS DDM SNR with SMAP data to correlate diurnal mean soil moisture sensing was analyzed in the regional study of Myanmar, which is prone to climatic and weather conditions. The results showed that spaceborne GNSS-R soil moisture sensitivity was very useful during seasonal changes in regional observation. The DDM SNR surface reflectivity was strongly correlated with soil moisture according to surface temperature variations prepared from SMAP passive reflectometry. Sentinel SAR-1 data included the validation and verification of flood-prone areas affected by tropical storm surges or weather depressions in the monsoon season. The availability of surface reflectivity primarily relied on the surface roughness, surface temperature, and vegetation opacity for soil moisture retrieval. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Impacts on Soil Processes and Ecosystem)
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